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Full text of "The 1989 Palladium"


// ■ M 



Garry W. Cannon 
Editor-in-Chief 

Lori Featheringill 
Associate Editor 

Lisa Palmisano 
Associate Editor 

Jennifer Sohn 
Business Manager 

Jacqueline C. Smith 
Advisor 



CONTENTS 



Campus Life 


10 


Features 


46 


Classes 


78 


Entertainment 


138 


Organizations 


160 


Greeks 


232 


Sports 


290 


Faculty 


348 


Closing 


396 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/palladium89troy 



ilUdium M.r ttmbol of I 
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THE PALLADIUM 



Volume 78 



Troy State Universitv 



P.O. Box 43 



Troy, Alabama 



36082 



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Even before the school 
year began, before most 
students had even be- 
gun to pack for their move to 
Troy, students had some im- 
pressions as to what to expect 
when they reach their new 
home away from home. 

For the 4000 students of 
Troy State University main 
campus those impressions 
are sometimes right or some- 
times wrong. Whatever the 
case, the years at TSU main 
campus offers its students the 
opportunity to create many 
different and lasting impres- 




sions. The first impression of 
the campus is usually one of a 
unique friendliness among 
the students 
and instruc- 
tors. A 
Unique 
characteris- 
tic of TSU is 
that most of 
the instruc- 
tors know 
each of their 
students by 
their first 

The friendships developed dur- 
HaiTie. ing the college years never end. 

Many TSU alumnia visit the cam- 
pus to keep in touch with old 
friends. 



On any sunny afternoon you can find man. 
Stat.- students Lmnn out K (, " in K those pre< ious sun 
tans even if they h.< 




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The second most common impression of 
the TSU campus is one of EXCITEMENT. 
There is always something happening. The 
year starts with the opening of the football 
season, sorority rush, fraternity rush and of 
course a lot of welcome back parties. But that 
is just the first two weeks, the year also in- 
cludes Miss TSU, Adamsfeast, and much 
much more. 



Top: Joann Stone performs to the music "Pretty 
Women" during the opening number of the 1989 
Miss TSU pagenet. 

Bottom: Ian Hunt and instructor Bill Gauspoul 
enjoy a day in the sun during a sailing class. 







Top: All TSU students learn that the business office is 
the one place you are always going to wait in line. 
Bottom: Reid Pichard finds time to discuss the even- 
ings social plans. 



Middle: )oni Shank gives a new 

meaning to a well decorated dorm 

room. 

Bottom: The Dorthy Kelly Adams 

University Center offers students 

switching classes a chance to get 

their mail. 



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The greatest impressions of 
college life are usually 
shared with the friends that 
you make while at TSU. The 
simple things in life like de- 
signing the decore for your 
dorm room, lunch at the 
Adams Center, a trip to 
Montgomery to do a little 
shopping and even standing 
in line at the business office 
is more fun if it is spent with 
a friend. Of course, your 
friends are also a big plus 
when it comes time to study 

for a test and 
you can't 
make heads 
or tails out of 
your notes 
or if you just 
need some- 
one to ex- 
plain what day it is to you. 
Troy State University is 




made up of students with 
varying preferences, inter- 
est, goals and dreams. One 
of the most important les- 
sons that is taught at TSU is 
that basic respect for others 
ideas and belief is the only 
way a civilized world can 
exist. This lessen is one that 
has allowed TSU to become 
a world wide University sys- 
tem with over 12000 stu- 
dents. 

The goal of most students 
is to complete the neces- 
sary degree requirements 
and graduate. This is a goal 
that has many lasting im- 
pressions attached to it. The 
understanding of the peo- 
ple that students live with 
during their stay at TSU and 
the making of new friends is 
but one of the many excit- 
ing and lasting impressions. 



^*5ro« 




Middle: Lake Lagoon Park is were many students 
go to get away from everything. Jeff Steiner and 
Michelle Waddington share a special moment at 
the park. 

Bottom Left: The official chancellor medallion was 
created in 1987 when Dr. Ralph Wyatt Adams was 
named TSU's first Chancellor. 



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The beauty of the sunrise over lagoon park is but one of the 
many beautiful aspects of the TSU grounds. 



There are many lasting impressions 
that were made this year among 
these were the announced retire- 
ment of Chancellor Ralph Wyatt 
Adams, the opening of the new 2.5 
million dollor administration build- 
ing named in Chancellor Adams 
honor, the renaming of the Adams 
Center to the Dorthy Kelly Adams 
University Center, the changing of 
the decor of the Adam University 
Center, construction of a new the- 
ater and bowling alley, the constru- 
tion of a new foreign student ex- 
change house, the moving around 
of all the university offices and of 
course those individual impressions 
that each individual had of himself 
and the world around them. The 
most important impression to the 
senior class of 1989 was the gradu- 
ation ceremony held in Sartain Hall. 
It was the last spring commence- 
ment of Chancellor Ralph Wyatt 
Adams. 



- 




10 Campus Life 




Troy State 




Campus Life 



il 



There are many different ideas of what university life is like. Some believe it is a 
place to go party after high school and others believe it is a place of learning in order 
to prepare themselves for a successful future. In actuality it is a place for both, 
however, usually more studying than partying. 

Juggling textbooks and work responsibilities as well as making time for a social life 
is just one of the many obstacles a college student must master. 

The experiences of university life will form many fond lasting impressions. 




.. 



Derek Brown 
Heath DeRamus 
Cara English 
Tim Jacobs 
Ed Moseley 
Donald Norsworthy 
Photographers 



Lori Featheringill 

Se< lion I ditor 



(>.irr\ Cannon 
Lori Dean 
l is.! Heard 
Vince Stansbury 
Beth Weatherford 

Contributing Editors 






The Front Porch 



Troy's place for 

great times with 

good friends 



Every college town has at 
least one local place 
that is known as the 
"hot spot" of the town. Troy 
is no exception. 

"The Porch", as it is often 
referred to, is one of Troy's 
local "night clubs". It is here 
where everyone you want to 
see, and even those persons 
you don't care to see, can be 
found on most any given 
Thursday night. 

The Porch is nothing more 
than an aged building that 
has been converted into a 
dimly lit, musky smelling tav- 
ern, but it is at this place 
many TSU students can recall 
many fond, and for some, not 
so fond, memories. 

The Porch has a relaxed at- 



mosphere where you can 
shoot a game of pool, dance, 
sit and enjoy a drink or two 
with a friend, listen to the 
music, or just socailize. Most 
TSU students do a combina- 
tion of it all. 

Even if there are other par- 
ties and activities scheduled 
for a Thursday night, the 
evening is still not complete 
without a stop over at The 
Porch. Garry Cannon said, "I 
like to stop by about 11:30 to 
see whose out and what's go- 
ing on." 

For many students, memo- 
ries of The Front Porch will 
also bring back memories of 
great times with good 
friends. 





12 The Front Porch 







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The From Pon h 13 




Top Left: The Air Force offers a ca- 
reer choice for many students. 
Top Right: Debbie Blair takes a look 
at the job opportunities offered by 
Parisians. 

Bottom Left: The Veterans Adminis- 
tration Medical Center offers many 
jobs to nursing graduates. 
Middle: Criminal justice majors 
have a chance to join the "proud 
profession." 

Bottom Right: Gibson Vance, a Troy 
State graduate, tries to lure future 
graduates to his work place, Russell 
Athletics. 




14 Career Day 




CAREER DAY - 



A first glance of the "real" 
world is what Career Day of- 
fers a future college gra- 
duate. Career Day affords the 
students of TSU a chant e to 
see what future employers 
are looking for in employees. 
Career day is co-sponsored 
by the Placement Service of- 
fice and each department at 
TSU. Potential employers, 
from all areas, set up booths 
and hand out brochures. 
Each employer has material 
on their business and dis- 
cusses career possibilities 
with the students. Many stu- 
dents discover career oppor- 
tunities they had not been 
aware of before career day. 

Career day is open to the 
entire campus, not just 
graduating seniors. Juniors 
have the chance to meet 
people they can contact as 
graduation time approaches. 
Freshmen and sophomores 
are also encouraged to at- 
tend career day to help in the 
process of deciding "what to 



A Helping Hand 



do when they grow up." 

Representatives from st.in- 

and federal br.m< h«-s of the 
government, private busi- 
ness, the military, public and 
privtc schools, arui hospitals 
were available to the stu- 
dents this year. The list of po- 
tential employers included 
Ford Company, Gay fcrs, Fed- 
eral Bureau of Investigations, 
United States Air Force, US 
General Accounting Ottu <•. 
Veterans Administration 
Medical Center and many 
other familiar corporate 
name. 

Career Day was planned 
because many students were 
asking questions about what 
it takes to receive particular 
jobs. Through Career Day, 
the potential employers told 
students what degrees were 
in demand in today's work- 
ing world. 

Career Day lends a helping 
hand to those looking for a 
job in a world full of compe- 
tition. 



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Top: The new Ralph Wyatt Adam 
Administration Building glows witl 
its beauty. 

Bottom: The Chancellor's Offio 
exhibits the beauty and style that i 
characteristic of the new administra 
tion building. 



16 Administration Building 



*tfy<wonc9ty 'Dr. and 'Tftia. s4d&m& 



On May 1, 1989 the 
ceremonies for the 
dedication of the 
Ralph Wyatt Adams Admin- 
istration Building and the Re- 
dedication of the Dorothy 
Kelly Adams Universty Cen- 
ter were held. The "Star 
Spangled Banner", played by 
The Sound of the South, sig- 
nified the opening of the 
ceremony. Bill Buchannon, 
director of University Rela- 
tions, welcomed Dr. and 
Mrs. Adams' family, current 
and former Troy State Board 
members, members of the 
legislature, Troy State offi- 
cials, and students. 

Wallace Malone delivered 
he dedicatory remarks. 
Ralph's commitment to 
Troy State has been a labor of 
ove and a 365 days a year job, 
and because it has been a la- 
bor of love, it has never been 



a burden," stated Wallace 
Malone as he delivered the 
dedicatory remarks. Gover- 
nor Guy Hunt was unable to 
attend the dedication cere- 
mony, due to prior engage- 
ments, but he sent a prere- 
corded message comment- 
ing on how Alabama owes a 
great debt to Dr. and Mrs. 
Adams for his twenty five 
years of outstanding services 
and achievements. 

The Adams Center re- 
ceived a name change at the 
ceremony. The Adams Cen- 
ter, previously named the 
Ralphs Wyatt Adams Univer- 
sity Center, was rededicated 
to honor Troy State's first 
lady, Dorothy Kelley Adams. 
The Adams Center is consid- 
ered the "living room" of 
Troy State. The Adams Cen- 
ter provides conference 
space, ballrooms, and places 



for students to socialize, 
shop and eat. The Adminis- 
tration Building is the heart 
of Troy State. The building is 
convient and efficient be- 
cause students and adminis- 
trators can do almost all of 
their university business un- 
der one roof. The new Ad- 
ministration Buildings is 
52,000 square feet and cost 
approxiametely three mil- 
lions dollars. 

During the Adams' Ad- 
ministration Troy State has 
grown from a teachers col- 
lege to a liberal arts universi- 
ty to a international system. 
Dr. Adams has served as 
president of Troy since Oc- 
tober 1, 1964. At the time 
Troy State was a small state 
supported institution with 
barely 2,000 students, now, 
the Troy State University Sys- 
tem has 12,000 students at- 



tending ( lasses on campuses 
in Alabama, Georgia, Florida. 
and Europe. The progress is 
mainly due to the efforts of 
Dr. Adams and his love for 
Troy State. It seems onk fit- 
ting thai the "heart" of Troy 
State should be named and 
dedicated to him. Mrs. Ad- 
ams' love for the progress of 
the social well-being of the 
students is exemplified by 
the dedication of the "living 
center" of Troy State Univer- 
sity. 

With the growth of Troy 
State over the past 25 years, it 
seems only fitting that the 
heart of the campus and the 
living room of Tro\ State 
should be dedicated to two 
very special people who will 
never be forgotten. Thanks 
Dr. and Mrs. Adams! 




Lett Ralph talwns cuts the dedica- 
tory ribbon for the grand opening ol 
the Ralph \\\att \dams ^dminisrra- 
tion Building 



The ^dmlnl<.tratlon Building V 



Creating 



the Corporate 
Image 




Above: Fashion models are: Deb- 
bie Blair, Patrick Hall and Shelley 
Amison. 



18 Fashion 






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Fashion among the corpo- 
much more than 
the standard navj blue suit. 
Vibrant col' 
their impa< t in the bus: 
work), whethei 
colored bLi 
c at< hinu 
beinj 

;ions 
of lh< 

For men, striped trou« 
susp< 

ored ja< I- .ill the • 

As for women, bright 

: suits will the 

rid tailored pant- 
suits are popular I the 

their pla< e in tl 

theii 







Fashion models are: Kim Gore, Mi- 
chele Smith, Lisa Heard, Vince Stans- 
bury, Gretchen Crim and Fred 
McBryde. 



Photography by: Cara English 



20 Fashion 








!•»"<•• • 




Fashion is a statement 
made by an individual by 
the clothes that he or she 
chooses to wear. Our 
clothes can reveal wheth- 
er we are feeling tough, 
businesslike, romantic, ca- 
sual or a little of each. This 
year's fashion trends in- 
cluded skirts ranging in 
length from mini to long, 
turtleneck shirts for both 
men and women, the "ca- 
reer look'-blazcrs, jackets 
and wide- legged pants, 
long shorts, anything in 
black or plaid and of 
course, denimn. 



Fashion 21 




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Fashion models are: Stephanie Rus- 
sell, Michaela Lockridge, Steve 
Gorey, Hope Jackson and Guy Pres- 
ton. 



22 Fashion 





&f> 







The spring and summer sea- 
sons are the months for fun 
in the sun, dark tans and hot 
clothes. This season's bathing 
suits for women were 
brighter than ever with some 
of the popular looks being 
florescent colors, the "wet 
suit" and bikinis. For men, 



brightly colored shorts, mir- 
rored sunglasses and dark 
tans were hot. Cool cotton 
shorts and shirts were also fa- 
vorite clothing items during 
the hot days when feeling 
cool and looking great is a 
fashion must. 




Fashion 23 



Building on 

Solid Foundations 



Dirt mounds, scaffold- 
ing, concrete walls 
and construction 
workers became everyday 
sights on TSU's campus 
throughout the year. In the 
last year, TSU has initiated 
several construction and 
renovation endeavors. The 
expansion of the newly ren- 
amed Dorothy Kelly Adams 
University Center is one of 
the more significant of these 
endeavors. 

Construction began in the 
Fall of 1988 and the comple- 
tion goal date is set for Fall of 
1989. The addition is being 
made to the south side of the 
building and is being ex- 
tended out in the direction 
of where the tennis courts 
were previously located. 

The new addition will in- 
clude an eight lane bowling 
alley and a completely facili- 
tated theater. The expanded 
area brings the total size of 
the Adams Center to 80,000 
square feet. 

The bowling alley will fea- 
ture AMF equipment as well 
as video projectors for auto- 
matic scoring. With the com- 
pletion of the bowling alley 
will come intramural bowling 
teams, physical education 
classes and community 
leagues. 

The theater will feature a 
full drama stage with a seat- 
ing capacity of 273. There 
will also be dressing rooms as 
well as a lobby. Most produc- 
tions performed in the fu- 
ture by the Department of 
Speech and Drama will be 
performed in the new the- 
ater. 



In addition, a full satellite 
system will be installed so 
that concerts, sporting 
events and other special ac- 
tivities can be broadcasted 
on a big screen television. 

Through the various con- 
struction and renovation 
projects going on at TSU, 
particularly the expansion of 
the Adams Center. There is 
evidence of Troy State's 
growth. Upon completion 
of the renovations of the 
Adams Center, there will be 
a newer and more modern 
facility in which students, 
faculty and members of the 
Troy community can come 
and enjoy the benefits that 
come from a university that is 
built on solid foundations. 





24 Solid Foundations 




Solid FoundalH 



Dating in College 
can often lead to 









here is an old joke 
about women who go 
off to college hoping 
to get an MRS degree. Yes, 
that's MRS as in married. 
Even though for some the 
thought of getting married 
seems as distant as the moon, 
it is quite common for a stu- 
dent to meet his or her fu- 
ture spouse while at college. 

Perhaps this is because a 
college campus has such a 
wide variety of people on it. 
There is, more often than 
not, usually at least one per- 
son of the opposite sex with 
similar ideas, interests and 
goals as yourself, and if 
you're lucky, they may even 
be good looking. Also, be- 
cause of the many activities 
going on around college 
campuses, the opportunities 
to meet new people are nu- 
merous. This was the case for 
Christina Coates and Chris 
Walker. They were brought 
together by the Sound of the 
South band. They both 
played the same instrument 
and from this common bond, 
the relationship grew. They 
plan to be married in June of 
1990. 

For others the road to the 
chapel isn't so smooth. Lori 
Featheringill said "I waited 
for him for almost two years 
until he quit dating other 
girls and realized I was his 
Mrs. Right." But persever- 
ence paid off and she and her 
fiance' plan to marry in Au- 
gust of 1989. 

Members of the Greek sys- 
tem have their own unique 
way of announcing the exisi- 
tence of a serious romance. 
For the women, a candlelight 
service is held in which a can- 



dle is passed around the cir- 
cle of girls until it reaches the 
lucky girl who has become 
engaged or lavaliered, who 
then blows the candle out. A 
guy gives his fraternity lava- 
Mere to his girl to wear 
around her neck as a sign of 
their deep committment. 
Many people think of this as 
a "pre-engagement" symbol. 
Now all this may sound de- 
pressing to those of you who 
have yet to have a date twice 
in one month and who have 
decided that there are no 
more Mr or Mrs Rights left in 
the world, but take heart and 
be patient. Enjoy the fun and 
carefree aspects of dating 
and eventuality, when you 
least expect it, you'll find 
your Mr of Mrs Right and 
you'll be going to the chapel 
too. 



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Top: Bobby Belcher gives his lava- Bottom: Christina Coates and 
liere to Jennifer King. Chris Walker enjoy a picnic at the 

lagoon. 



26 Going to the Chapel 




Top Loft: Many TSU students < noose 

to get married in Sorrell ( hapel 
Top Ri^ht: The Alpha Delta PI'i fi.ir • 

ticipate in a ( andlelighi set ■ 

Bottom: Danny Blaiock and 
Tammy Schofield enjoy an after- 
noon together feeding the ducks at 
the lagoon. 



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Photography by: Can English 



Going to the C hay 




28 Counseling and Placement 



Counseling and Placement Services 

Tough Choices Made Easy 




Having trouble de< id- 
ing on a major? Need 
interview practice 
and pointers on writing an 
effective resume'? The 
counseling and placemen! 
offices proudc these and 
other useful services for all 
TSU students. 

The counseling office pro- 
vides such services as career 
counseling, personal coun- 
seling and academic advise- 
ment for undecided and 
conditionally admitted stu- 
dents. 

A career exploration and 
planning class is also taught 
to help students learn how to 
better prepare themselves 
for their desired futures. An- 
other special service that is 
available for student's use is 
the DISCOVER computer 




program. It is a program thdi 
allows you to learn about var- 
ious fields and the qualifica- 
tions they require. It also 
helps to narrow your focus 
on a particular major so thai 
you will know what your 
cific area of interest is. 

Shereel Bees, a counselor, 
said, "Many of the students 
who come in are in their 
freshman and sophomores 
years and need help select- 
ing a major field of St 
however, the upper class- 
men also come in wanting 
advisement on post-gradu- 
ation plans and graduate 
schools." 

The placement office of- 
ten works in conjunction 
with the counseling office. 
The primary student seme es 
offered by the placement of- 
fice are credential services, 
assistance in writing effec live 
resumes and applications, 
setting up interviews v\ith 
perspective employers and 
referral services. The place- 
ment office also sets up sea- 
sonal and summer employ- 
ment for students. 

The placement office also 
has directories, brochures 
and helpful literature on var- 
ious companies. From these 
students can get a good idea 
about what a company does, 
potential salaries and job 
qualifications. 

The services provided b\ 
the counseling and pi. 
ment offices can be benefi- 
cial to any student whether 
you are undecided about e\ - 
erything of whether it's \our 
last year and you need help 
preparing for your entrance 
into the real world". Utilize 
these services, the benefits 
can last a lifetime. 



Top: Lori Dean uses the DISCOV- 
ER program to look at various fields 
of study. 

Boffom: Carolyn Gibson talks with 
Amy Evans about her resume. 



Counseling and Placemen! 29 




Top Left: Cristy Miceli enjoys the or- 
chids in the greenhouse. 
Top right: Kristina Lawerence and 
Bill Remus enjoy a walk along one of 
the many trails in the arboretum. 
Bottom: The lake is the focal point of 
beauty at the arboretum. 




Photography by: Cara English 



30 Arboretum 



thi 



Arboretum 



TSU Students Get Back To Nature 



The Troy State Universi- 
ty Arboretum is a rela- 
tively new feature at 
TSU, having been in exisi- 
tance for just a little over a 
year. 

An arboretum is a botani- 
cal garden or a place devoted 
to the cultivation of treesand 
shrubs. 

The Arboretum is located 
on Pell Avenue and is open 
from dawn to dusk. The site, 
containing 75 acres of 
swamp, stream bottom and 
old field was dedicated on 
May 11th, 1987. This was the 
result of forsight and long 
hours of hard work by two 
men: Chancellor Ralph W. 
Adams and Dr. Wayne Ad- 
ams. As TSU and the City of 
Troy continued to grow and 
expand, it was felt that an 
area near tha campus needed 




to be set aside as an outdoor 
laboratory and teaching fa- 
cility not only for the Univer- 
sity but for the community as 
a whole. This site represents 
in a small area a number of 
different habitats where stu- 
dents can view the plant as- 
sociation as well as a place to 
"get away form it all" and en- 
joy a quiet walk in the woods. 
In March of 1988 the Dr. 
Henry Bridges Greenhouse 
was completed and opened 
to the public. An interesting 
and educational addition to 
the arboretum, this green- 
house contains a large col- 
lection of orchids donated 
by Dr. Bridges and others. 
Also two half-mile long self- 
guiding nature trails were 
added. Covering a number of 
different habitats, these trails 
point out some of the unique 



tenures of the arboretum. As 
a living laboratory, the arbo- 
retum is( onstantly c hanging. 
Whether the subtle changes 
of seasons or longer term 
successional changes, each 
visit offers something new to 
discover. 

Alvin Diamond, director of 
the arboretum said, "The ar- 
boretum is used by the stu- 
dents and faculty of TSU as 
well as by many commumu 
groups, such as the Troy Gar- 
den Club and the Boy 
Scouts." 

The arboretum is a place 
where one can get away from 
it all among the beauty of the 
lake and the trees. One can 
truly take the time to enjoy 
nature and all of the simple 
beauties it affords. 




Left: Dawn Howell uses the Arbore- 
tum as a quiet place to study. 
Right: The greenhouse contains a 
large collection of beautiful or hids 



Arboretum 31 



All This And 



orking part-time 

while attending 

school has be- 

ome a common place activ- 

y for TSU students. 

While many students are 

le to qualify for one of the 

workstudy or one of the 

workship jobs available 

n campus, many others are 

ployed by local busin- 

ses. 

Even though many stu- 
ents are encouraged to 
ork while in school, a study 
f working students pub- 
shed in the 1987 "Journal of 
uman Resources" revealed 
lat working more than 25 
ours per week increases the 
robability of a student's 
rades to fall and ultimately 
icreases the chance of his 
ropping out of school en- 
rely. 

However, students who 
ork less than 25 hours per 
ork on campus are more 
cely to not only be unaf- 
fected academically, but are 
also consider more likely to 
consider graduate school 
after graduation. 

In addition, there is no evi- 
dence that working while in 
college increases future 
earnings, but there is much 
evidence that working stu- 
ents do not graduate on 
ne. 

Nonetheless, students 
10 work see both positive 
id negative aspects of their 
tuations. 

"Working interferes with 
jdy time, but is also gives 
students great potential for 
better working relations 
after graduation," said Lisa 
Taylor, who works 15 hours 
each week in a video store. 
"Working can keep yoi 
from attending functions or 
campus or studying, but it 
also puts you in a different 
atmosphere other than 
school and it teaches you 



how to handle your time," 
said Kim Wickline, a 25 hour 
per week employee at Wal- 
Mart. 

"I would take more classes 
if I didn't work," said Mark 
Bodiford, who is employed 
by a local animal hospital. 
"However, because I work 
with the public, I feel that 
working is a good exper- 
ience." 

Although there are not 36 
hours in a day, it seems that 
eventually things fall into line 
and time is made to do the 
things that are most desired. 
TSU students really do have 
time to do all this and home- 
work too. 



Top: Lisa Flowers and Keith Wilson 
design a jersey while on the clock at 
Graphics Exchange. 
Bottom: Mr. J's keeps Patty Backen- 
sto busy with food orders. 





32 Working Students 



Homework Too 





Top Left: Jackie McMillian helps a 
student with a tape selection in the 
Speciality Shop in the Adams Cen- 
ter. 

Top Right: Randall Barr spends some 
of his free time working at Food 



World when he is not hitting the 
books. 

Bottom: Working at Wal-Mart pro- 
vides Charles Rogers *ith ih< 
cash he needs to pay for th< 
penses that only college life brings 




.'. • 



ROOMMATES: 



The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly. 



Most all of us have had at 
least one. They come in 
many sizes and shapes with 
many little idiosyncrasies. 
Some are super and others 
are super awful. They are 
roommates and they can be a 
dream come true or a living 
nightmare. 

Remember your first one? 
Most say those are the worst. 
It seems freshmen always get 
the ones no one else wants. 

You know the ones with 



oily hair, dirty fingernails and 
bad breath. Most of them 
have wierd habits like using 
your toothbrush or washing 
their hair at 3:00 a.m. 

Your mom says becoming 
accustomed to sharing a 
room or even an apartment 
with another person is part of 
adjusting to your new col- 
lege home. Whether your 
roommate decorates the 
walls with Ozzy Osborne 
posters or sets the kitchen on 



fire, it is all part of the fun. 

Even so, everyone says col- 
lege is a learning experience 
and learning about different 
people from different back- 
grounds can be a valuable ex- 
perience as long as you don't 
have to experience it for- 
ever, right? 

If your roommate snores, 
eats all your food and has an 
alarm clock that sounds like a 
fire engine, don't panic. It 
could be worse. 



"My worst roommate ex- 
perience was receiving a 
$400 phone bill which con- 
sisted of calls he had made," 
a junior management major 
said. 

"I really thought my room- 
mate was normal," said a 
freshman from Florida. "I 
soon found out he spent 
many hours watching reruns 
of Mr. Ed." 

And you thought your 
roommate was bad? Maybe 




Top: Stacey Coates, George Doth- 
ard and Adam Byrd enjoy spending 
time with neighboring roommates 
playing scruples. Roomates can re- 
late to this game. 



Top Right: Gina Brown and her 
roommate straighten their apart- 
ment after recieving a call that mom 
was on her way to visit. 
Left: Anne Marie Bell questions Sta- 



cey Coates in the Rommate Game 
just to discover how much he knows 
about his roommate Garry Cannon. 



34 Roommates 




The Roommate 
Game 



The Adams Center Union 
Board sponsored the third 
annual "Roommate Game" 1.1 
take off from the Newlywed 
Game). This year the game 
was broken into two prelimi- 
nary rounds and then the fin- 
als. Each preliminary con- 
sised of four pairs of couples 
who had to answer questions 
such as: What soap opera 



does your roommate like u, 
w.iw h? or Who stays out the 
latest > 

After some very stiff com- 
petition the final winners 
were Carla Hines and Con- 
daice Milbrie. Each winner 
recieved twenty-five dollors 
and a plaque. In some cases it 
actually pays to know your 
roommate. 




llMBMMBBl^Ma^na 



Bottom: Kendall Coates calls mom 
to let her know lhat all is well. 



what you thought was an on- 
going nightmare was simply a 
tiny bad dream. 

On the other hand, mam 
students are fortunate 
enough to have great room- 
mates. 

A good roommate tells 
white lies to your parents 
when they want to know 
where you were at 2:00 a.m. 
yesterday morning 

A good roommate types 
your papers, puts up with 
your bad habits and lets \ou 
use her shampoo What 
more could you ask for? \i . 
roommate is my best friend 
and we have a super til 
said a senior journalism ma- 
jor. "I ha\e had m\ share of 
bad roommates, but this one 
is great." 

"My roommates and I ha\ e 
had our share of ups and 
downs, but we have been to- 
gether for three years," said a 
senior busiess major. "It was 
difficult at first, but now we 
know each other and we 
know how to respond to 
(\u h others bad moods. It 
just takes time. 

Ken though everyone has 
.1 had" roommate stor\ to 
tell, many students relate 
good experiences about 
their roommate- 

\\ hether good or bad 
your college roommates are 

people \ou surely will nevef 
forget 



• 



Stewart Hall: 



To Eat 

Or 

Not To Eat 



Does anyone really go 
there for the food? 

Even after all the horrible 
comments made about the 
food, why does everyone 
keep going to Stewart Dining 
Hall? 

Some reliable sources say 
it's not the food, but the so- 
cial life and a little gossip. 

"I definitely don't go to 
SAGA for the food," said Su- 
san Owens, a junior from Old 
Texas. 

Girls use eating in the cafe- 
teria as an opportunity to lo- 
cate quys they are interested 
in, said Owens. 

"I once had a friend who 
rolled her hair and redid her 
make-up to impress a guy she 



knew would be there," 
Owens said. "Another friend 
spilled her food on herself 
when she was trying to scope 
out guys." 

"Girls sit at the tables and 
scope out guys," said Christy 
King, a junior from Mobile. 

Several guys I met at 
pledge swaps came up and 
talked to me in the cafeteria, 
said King. 

"Its is a easy place to be 
yourself and get to know a 
girl your interested in," said 
Mark Alessandroni, senior 
from York Pennsavania. "I 
would sometimes accidently 
on purpose pick up a girl's 
keys just so I could return 
them to her later that night. 




Top RighfCindy Stephenson and 

Debbie Bell enjoy steak night at 

Saga. This event is held about once a 

month. 

Top Right: Choosing what you want 

to eat can be a very hard decision 

sometimes. 



Sometimes it worked. Some- 
times it didn't." 

"You really have to be 
careful not to drop your tray, 
because guys will stand up 
and clap," said King. 

"People eat at the cafeteria 
because of the social life 
rather than the cost or qual- 
ity of the food," said Doug 
Russell, a junior from Eliza- 
bethtown, North Carolina. "I 
really enjoy seeing people in 
SAGA. I met several girls 
there and ended up going 
out with several of them." 

"SAGA has changed alot 
since I have been at Troy 
State," said Garry Cannon, a 
senior from Andalusia, Ala- 
bama. "They (SAGA) have 



started new programs and 
are really trying to make the 
food better, but it will never 
be the food the students are 
use to getting at home. How- 
ever it is the only place were 
you can get the details on 
who is seeing who, what 
roommates are fighting 
about, and of course my fa- 
vorite is getting all the details 
on the new freshman ladies." 
To eat or not to eat is not 
the question. However it is 
quiet apparent that when 
you eat at Stewart Hall you 
better look your best be- 
cause that someone special 
you are looking for may be 
on the menu that night. 




36 Saga 





Top lohn SelUn and Clitt - 
get some Bacos to make their salad 

e\en hetter 
Bottom: \ look at what Vina em- 
plosi it\ da\ at work 






New Quarter, 
New Beginnings 



The start of a new quar- 
ter brings with many 
opportunities for new 
beginnings. Many students 
who have transferred from a 
school on the semester sys- 
tem to TSU where the quar- 
ter system is used say they 
like it much better. Jeff Can- 
non, who transferred from 
Huntington College, said, 
"When you're on the quarter 
system you have less time to 
goof off, you've got ten 
weeks to make good grades, 
not sixteen. But if you don't 
do as well as you should, you 
don't have to let it get you 
down for half the year, you 
just start fresh the next quar- 
ter and try to do better." 

The beginning of a new 
quarter is always a busy time. 
Registration lines must be 
waited in, ID pictures have to 



be made, moving and settling 
in the dorms or an apartment 
must be done, bills must be 
paid and friends must be vis- 
ited. There is a lot to do in a 
few days time. Jennifer Sohn 
said, "The beginning of a 
new quarter is so rushed, I 
use up a whole quarter's 
worth of energy just trying to 
get settled and preparing for 
classes to begin. 

But in a bizarre kind of 
way, it's fun too. Kristina 
Lawrence said, "I stay so busy 
trying to get things done that 
I actually work more effi- 
ciently during the beginning 
of the quarter than at almost 
any other time." 

Each new quarter brings 
with it new challenges, new 
chances and opportunities 
and a chance for new begin- 
nings. 








38 New Beginnings 




Opposite Page: Top: Registration 
for classes is one of the highlights of 
each new quarter. 
Bottom: Student ID pictures are 
made at the beginning of each quar- 
ter. 

This Page: Top: Hermia Simmons 
and Pamela Tate unload thier things 



from the car and prepare to move 
into their dorm room. 
Bottom Left: Students fill out the in- 
formation sheets for their ID cards. 
Bottom Right: Pictures for the Palla- 
dium are taken at the beginning of 
each fall quarter. 






PRE-COLLEGE ORIENTATION 



Top Left: Van English, Assistant Di- 
rector of Admissions, welcomes the 
incoming students. 
Top Right: PCO students register for 
orientation. 




Bottom Left: An incoming student 
takes the English placement test 
during the orientation session. 
Bottom Right: The 1988 PCO Lead- 
ers: Row One: Liz Williams, Leslie 
Ann Jones, Missy Schofield, Buddy 
Starling; Director of PCO, Anne- 
marie Bell and Jenni James. Row 
Two: Mark Alessandroni, Wade Ad- 
ams, Erik Brooks,Neal Nash and Matt 
Mingus. 




40 Pre-College Orientation 




A Glimpse of What's to Come 



Often the transition from 

high school to < ollege can be 

.1 diffic ult and somet inies 

frightening expei ien< e tor 

incoming freshman. Dreams 
of college life are filled with 
excitement and anticipation 
but also many anxieties. Troy 
State has a summer program 
known as Pre-College Ori- 
entation that is designed to 
help make this transistion as 
easy as possible for new stu- 
dents. 

The perspective student is 
invited to one of seven 
weekend sessions in which 
the student is able to meet 
other new students and be- 
come familiar with Troy 



state's < ampus .is well as w ith 

its polic ics and pro< edures 
< one ei ning sue h things as 

registration, housing and 
meal tit kets. 

rhe students arc able tO 

talk to fa< ultv members in 

their intended field ol study, 
re< ei\ e help in filling out 
schedules and actually pre- 
registei for fall quarter dur- 
ing the or ientation weekend. 
The TSU orientation lead- 
ers play a key role in intro- 
du< ing the students to all as- 
pec ts of TSU's campus. Ten 
men and women are select- 
ed from the student body on 
the basis of academic 
achievement, leadership and 



student involvement 1 1 
leaders guide the in< oming 
freshmen through the orien- 
tation weekend by helping 

them gel ai quainted w ith 

other students, introduc ing 

them to the various extra- 

c urnc ulai ac tmties ISU of- 
ters and by prouding assis- 

t.iiK e with making out < lass 
s( hedules. 

The- orientation sessions 
make it easier tor new stu- 
dents to adjust to TSU, and 
they leave feeling more < 
fidenl about Troy State and 
excited about their upcom- 
ing c ollege experier.< e 





Top:PCO students talk with a lac ults 
ad\ isoi about .i ( areer in journalism 

Bottom: The 1 PCO leaders entertain 

the students during an orientation 

session. 



• ntation 41 



t 70ta6i*ty t&e Tteua 




After 32 grounded months, the U.S. 
Space Program was once again 
reaching for the stars. The space 
shuttle Discovery made a perfect 
launch from the Kennedy Space 
Center in early October, 1988. 



« 



Led by Federal special 
prosecutor Lawrence Walsh, 
the infamous Oliver North 
was on the defensive again. 
North was found gulity but 
questions about the Iran- 
Contra affair still linger. 

Fifteen years after the Su- 
preme Court upheld abor- 
tion in Roe vs. Wade, the de- 
bate continues. A new type 
of "civil war" seems to be 
raging throughout America 
as the Pro-Life and Pro- 
Choice groups battle it out 
on the Supreme Court steps. 
It appears that Roe vs. Wade 
didn't settle the issue after 
all. 

From the sound of the 
term "computer viruses", 
one would think that com- 
puters were literally getting 
sick. Well, in a sense they are. 
Small but deadly computer 
programs that disrupt oper- 
ations and destroy data have 
infected the computer worl- 
d,and have raised questions 
about the vulnerability of 
systems everywhere. 

Soviet General Secretary 
Mikhail Gorbachev made his 
historic visit to the United 
States. Accompanied by his 
wife, the pair visited New 
York and Washington while 
conferring with President 
Reagan. 

Following the historic So- 
viet visit, President Reagan 
visited the U.S.S.R. He 
toured Red Square and 
shook hands with the crowd 
as General Secretary Gorba- 
chev had done in New York. 
The two leaders planned fu- 
ture summits and better rela- 
tions. 

The United States Air 
Force unvailed the long- 








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■- A. 



42 Current Events 



Mississippi Burning / a film 
based on the murder of three 
civil rights workers in 1964 by 
the Klu Klux Klan rekindled 
memories and d e b a t e s 
around the country. It also 
raised questions about the 
way history may be bent in 
the pursuit of the dollar. 



Arnold Schwarzeneggei 
and Danny Devito starred in 

the hit movie Twins . This mi- 
quely funny movie about ha- 
ter nal twins who are part ol .1 
government experiment 
brought out the best in its 
two stars. 



The frightfully funm Bee- 
tle Juice, starring Michael 

ke.iton, was a surpr ise smash 
that racked up more than 
$100 million at the box ottic e 
in 1988 and ranked number l 

among t idetx assette rentals. 




awaited STEALTH bomber 
early in 1989. The futuristic 
bomber which can fly un- 
dected by radar is consid- 
ered to be the world's fore- 
most technically advanced 
bomber. 

Vice President George 
Bush captured the Presiden- 
cy in November of 1988 after 
a long and much debated 
campaign. The Bush-Quayle 
ticket trounced over the 
Democratic team of Dukakis- 
Bentsen. However, the Bush- 
Quayle ticket only gained 51 
percent of the popular vote. 

Top Left: Pro-Life demonsu 

march in front of the Supri 

Court. 

Middle Left Newcomer Bobby 

McFerrin took his hit "Don't \\ 

Be Happy" to No.1 in 1988. 

Bottom Lefr. George Bush takes the 

Presidencial oath of office. 

Top Right: Mikhail Gorbac he\ 

waves good-bye, after his hi-toric 

visit to the I 5 

Bottom Right: Ronald Reagan and 

his wife share a dance at a Wash ng- 

ton reception honoring them. 



Current i 



0,e*&*e 




Top: Panama's Noriega: Still the 
strong man. 

Middle: PLO leader Yassir Arafat 
talks peace to old enemies. 
Bottom: Armenian earthquake sur- 
vivors seach through rubble for oth- 
er survivors. 



"V* 



~ - 




44 Current Events 



^etefiective 




Palestinian Liberation Orga- 
nization leader Yassir Arafat 
made a historic gesture of 
peace by formally denounc- 
ing terrorism. He also made 
official announcements con- 
cerning official dialogue be- 
tween his organization and 
the United States and even 
Israel. However, the Israelis 
were quick to denounce 
Arafat's proposals even after 
Secretary of State George 
Shultz announced the U.S. 
would be willing to confer 
with the PLO. 

Political uprisings in 
Burma, China, Chile, and 
South Korea made headlines 
all though the year as ideals 
of peace swept through oth- 



er countries. While the Con- 
tras were withdrawing from 
Afghanistan and losening 
their grip on the Eastern 
Block countries. 

In Poland, Solidarity leader 
Lech Walesa led his army of 
workers in peaceful demon- 
strations and strikes which 
forced in a new government 
and a trainload of much 
needed reforms. 

Hungary, traditionally con- 
sidered the most democratic 
East Block nation, tore down 
its bob-wire border fence on 
its border with Austria. 

The people of Chile suc- 
cessfully ousted their dicta- 
tor with the power of the 
vote. 



Students in Peking, China 
began massive protests in 
May of 1989 calling for 
sweeping reform and de- 
mocracy. Even though the 
Chinese government 

banned news coverage, the 
students continued their vig- 
il of democratic prot' est. 

Iran and Iraq came to terms 
of peace after the Iraqi side 
had come close to victory. 
With United Nations negoti- 
ations the two countries 
agreed upon a ceasefire. The 
infamous Ayatullah Khomeni 
had this to say following the 
ceasefire agreement; "Mak- 
ing this decision was more 
deadly than drinking poi- 
son." Khomeni's reign of ter- 



ror ended when he had < (im- 
plications following suruir, 
and died on June 4, 1989. 

The nation of Vietnam for- 
mally announced its m i 1 1 1 d r \ 
withdrawal from Cambodia. 
However, many experts fear 
a harsher existence may be in 
store for the ravaged Cambo- 
dian people as they may face 
another Pol Pot regime as in 
the mid 70's which killed 
over two million Cambo- 
dians. 

A disasterous air show 
killed at least 69 people at a 
U.S. air base in West Ger- 
many. The incident involved 
a collision among a precision 
flying team from Italy. 




Current t \cv 




46 Features 




Features 



Homecoming, the event of the year, brings the undergraduate and the alumni of 
Troy State University together again to share old memories and make a few new 
ones. With the pageantry of parades, football and the all important crowning of the 
Homecoming Queen, everyone finds that no matter the age of a Trojan, he still acts 
like a Trojan. 

After Homecoming, the students await the coming of Miss TSU which is spon- 
sored by The Palladium each year. This year's pagent was well worth the wait. With 
twenty- eight of TSU most beloved ladies performing, the night was one of many 
lasting impressions. 




Derek Brown 
Heath DeRamus 
Cara English 
Tim Jacobs 
Ed Moseley 
Donald Norsworthy 
Photographers 



Lisa Palmisano 
Section Editor 



Kyle Smith 

Michelle Waddington 

Contributing Editors 



Feat: 



TSU Cheerleading Tryouts 



Dedication is a Must! 



Top: The Cheerleading judges sit 
quietly and concentrate on each 
contestant's routine. 
Bottom: With all her might, Trish 
Gabaldon jumps "in close to" per- 
fect form for the judges. 




Cheerleading tryouts at TSU is taken very seriously 
by those who tryout. Extensive training and practice 
takes place one week prior to the actual tryout date. 
The practices or workshops, as they are sometimes 
referred to, consist of all the contestants learning a 
dance routine and perfecting required jumps. Only 
five women and five men can make the traveling 
team but there are two women and two men chosen 
as alternates. 



48 Cheerleading Tryouts 






Top Left: Cheerlcading takes per- 
fect form and total concentration. 
Top Left: Heather Huber and Rob- 
ert Ramsey take a stance before they 
begin their routine. 
Bottom: Chad Tortice must posess 
great strength to lift Teresa McKin- 
ney with two hands, but Teresa's ter- 
rific sense of balance makes Chad's 
job easier. Greg Willis and Keith 
Weeks stand by as spotters. 



Cheerleading Tryout 






In this day and age, TSU's Homecoming 
Queen and her court are independent, 
sophisticated and highly intelligent. They 
are girls with . . . 



s4 SfrUfatty ^c££ene*ice 





Monica Hasley, 1988-89 Home- 
coming Queen 

Opposite Page: Top Left: Cretchen 
Crim 

Opposite Page: Top Right: Leslie 
Anne Jones 

Opposite Page: Bottom Left: Jenni 
James 

Opposite Page: Bottom Right: An- 

nemarie Bell 



50 Homecoming 







Homecoming 51 



Thanks Dr. and 




Top Left: Homecoming Queen, 
Monica Hasley receives her home- 
coming bouquet of flowers. 
Middle: Dr. and Mrs. Adam's pause 
to wave to their admiring croud at 
the half time ceremony. 
Bottom Left: The reigning Miss TSU, 
Joanne Stone waves to the people of 
Troy. 



52 Homecoming 



Mrs. Adams 




Top: The TSU Interfrdternity Coun- 
( il's float is full of girls supporting 
their favorite fraternities. 
Middle: Debbie McGill presents Dr. 
and Mrs. Adams with a plaque from 
the Student Government Associ- 
ation. 

Bottom Right: Traveling incognito, 
a loyal TSU fan joins cheerleader 
lean Brown in a couple of laughs! 






HOMECOMING 1988 



Top: Mark Dempsey and Sigma Pi 

Lee Hix coax their mascot to start the 

parade! 

Left: At the Homecoming festivities, 

the Sigma Chi's raise a little cain and 

have a good time. 

Bottom Right: Sherry Wallace and 

Julie Thorpe serve up some punch at 

the Adam's House reception. 





Let The Tradition 



54 Homecoming 




Top Left: fog! " 

pha Gam's stir up some excitement 

at the |>.ir 

Top Right: rh< K.i;>pa Delta's show 

thai T si is number one. 

Middle: Mways in the midst of 

things, the TSU err | add 

spirit to mam Tros State events. 

Bottom Right: The Alumni TSU 

band members show everyone that 

oner i musu lan always a musician 



Move You!! 



Homecoming 55 




56 Features 



K 



/ 




<j\ 



h 



i 






i •--. 







Top: Lisa Visco, Garyn Harrington 
and Sarah Palmer present Kenny 
Grimes with the 1989 Most Wanted 
Man Award. 

Middle: Intermission gave all so- 
rorities and fraternities time to en- 
tertain- even the ADPi's got in on 
the actl 

Bottom: Airband mania got every- 
body involved. 







Miss TSU 1989-90 



Annemarie Bell 



"Having never been in a 
pageant, I never realized all 
the hard work that went into 
preparing for a pageant. 
After lots of thought and 
much support from friends 
and family, I decided to enter 
the Miss TSU Pageant. I enjoy 
entertaining and decided 
this would be the best 
chance for me to entertain. 
Much of my preperation in- 
volved being informed on 
political and social issues for 
the interview, and lot of 
practice for talent and stage 
presence. Being crowned 
Miss TSU 1989 was one of the 
most exciting and surprising 
honors I've received at Troy 
State University. This honor 
gives me the chance to re- 
present the University that 
has given me and many other 
students many great memo- 
ries. My whole preperation 
for Miss TSU and Miss Ala- 
bama is centered around the 
support of Ms. Jacqueline 
Smith, my family, sorority sis- 
ters, fraternity brothers and 
all the TSU students. I can go 
to Birmingham and do my 
best for the University and al- 
ways know I have much sup- 
port behind me." 




'* ^ 








58 Miss TSU 




^ 






\^ 



S 




Top: The stage is set for all the 
contestants to make their walk for 
the audience and judges. 
Bottom: Jacqueline Smith adjusts 
Annemarie's banner before she gets 
her picture taken. 




M.ss TSU 59 



Behind the Scenes 

The Preperation is Tedious. 



• • • 



Annemarie Bell has never lost a 
beauty pageant. She won the first 
pageant she has ever been in Satur- 
day night when she was crowned the 
1989 Miss Troy State University. Bell, 
a 22-year-old senior majoring in 
criminal justice, said that she was 
very surprised that she won the pag- 
eant. Bell will compete in the Miss 
Alabama pageant in Birmingham 
during the second week of June. 
The pageant which lasts a week in- 
cludes three nights of talent compe- 
tition. The contestants were judged 
on personality, talent and appear- 
ance. The Saturday evening contest 
ended months of physical and men- 
tal preperation as well as a week of 
grueling practices, rehearsals and 
sleepless nights. The competition 
began with interviews with the 
judges. The culmination of the day's 
events came with the talent segment 
of the pageant that night, but the 
most exciting part was to be the fol- 
lowing night. The emcee was Bob 
Howell, a Troy State graduate who 
for the past 13 years has "opened the 
envelope to reveal the winner". This 
year's winner was Annemarie Bell 
with First runner-up, Jennifer Chil- 
dree, Second runner-up, Mary El- 
kins, Third runner-up, Leticia 
McCarley and Fourth runner-up 
Vernetta Rivers. 




Top: Jaqculine Smith and Herbert 
Reeves review last minute details. 
Bottom: Tiffany McDonnell brings 
to practice a few outfits to change 
into. 



60 Miss TSU 







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Top: The opening tl ■ 
formed to the popular sonx "f 
Woman". Joanrx Stone, I9W 
TSU, is surrounded by ih<- hand- 

escorts 
Middle Left )• I Idree re- 

hei first runner-up avsard 

Stlddle Right 1988 Miss rsi j. 
Stone crowns Annemarie Bell 
Bottom: Hard work and dedk 
does pay off Now comes tl . 
part Annemane poses vsith the 

Miss ISl. esc oris 







Vernetta Rivers, Talent Winner 



Bellamie Sauls, Swimsuit Winner 




62 Miss TSU 



*■ 


^■1 






* ~^i 






Top: A chain of emotions emerses 
from Annemaric Bell as Bob Howell 
announces her as 1989 Miss TSU. 
Middle Left: One of the happiest 
days of her life, Annemarie Bell 
poses with her beautiful bouquet of 
roses and trophy. 

Middle Right: The Sigma Chi's sing 
to the girl of their dreams after hrr 
crowning in the Miss TSU Pageant 



Mis, • - 



Who's Who Among Students in 



Joseph Lee Knight 

Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi 
Eta Sigma, Sigma Delta Chi, 
Tropolitan, sports editor; 
Delta Chi Fraternity, corre- 
sponding secretary, sports 
chairman; Intramurals, 
ACUB, vice president; 
George C. Wallace Leader- 
ship Scholarship, Dean's List, 
President's List. 



Virginia Marie Piazza 

Mortar Board, Omicron 
Delta Kappa, Psi Chi, vice 
president; Gamma Beta Phi, 
Trojan Ambassador, Trojan 
Hostess, Student Govern- 
ment, senator; Phi Mu Fra- 
ternity, Panhellenic, presi- 
dent, vice president; Palla- 
dium, fashion editor; 
President's List, Dean's List, 
George C. Wallace Scholar- 
ship, residence assistant. 



Mark Alessandroni 

Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi 
Eta Sigma, Mortar Board, 
Omicron Delta Kappa, Gam- 
ma Beta Phi, Alpha Epsilon 
Delta, vice president; Sigma 
Chi, scholarship chairman, 
Peterson chairman; Pre Col- 
lege Orientation Leader, stu- 
dent university tutor, Pre 
Med and Allied Health, vice 
president; intramurals. 



Pamela Ann McEwan 

SNEA, SCEC, Trojan Hos- 
tess, Chi Omega Sorority, so- 
cial chairman, scholarship 
chairman; Panhellenic, re- 
presentative; Student Gov- 
ernment, senator, constitu- 
tion and rules chairman; 
Campus Outreach, intramur- 
als. 




Dayna Caroline Ferry 

Alpha Lambda Delta, Al- 
pha Epsion Delta, Pre Med 
and Allied Health, Alpha 
Delta Pi, activities chairman, 
service chairman, pledge 
secretary; Air Force ROTC, 
public relations; Campus 
Outreach, University Danc- 
er. 



Gregory Allen Willis 

Omicron Delta Kappa, 
TSU Cheerleader, captain; 
Trojan Ambassador, Sigma 
Chi Fraternity, alumni chair- 
man; Young Republicans, 
Fellowship of Christian Ath- 
letes, Alexander City State 
Junior College, SGA senator, 
chorus, ensemble, Top Ten 
Student on Campus. 



Monica Lynn Anderson 

Gamma Beta Phi, Sigma 
Tau Delta, Alpha Psi Omega, 
treasurer; AATE, Trojan 
Ambassador, Alpha Gamma 
Delta, recording secretary, 
vice president scholarship, 
pledge class activities chair- 
man; Sigma Chi Little Sister, 
President's List, Dean's List, 
Pied Pipers, Student Govern- 
ment, supreme court justice. 



Phillip Eugene Weaver 

Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi 
Eta Sigma, Kappa Delta Pi, re- 
porter, historian; Sigma Tau 
Delta, historian, Phi Kappa 
Phi, SNEA, Baptist Student 
Union, president, ensemble, 
director of choir and ensem- 
ble; Collegiate Singers, intra- 
murals. 



64 Who's Who 



American Universities and Colleges 



Scott Buff 

Gamma Beta Phi, Mortar 
Board, historian; Omicron 
Delta Kappa, Phi Alpha The- 
ta, Trojan Ambassador, presi- 
dent; Young Republicans, 
Student Government, su- 
preme court justice; Sigma 
Chi Fraternity, scholarship 
chairman; President's List, 
Dean's List, ESU Oxford 
Scholarship, Who's Who in 
American University and 
Colleges. 



Kelley Dawn Simpson 

Gamma Beta Phi, Delta Sig- 
ma Pi, Phi Beta Lambda, sec- 
retary; Fellowship of Chris- 
tian Athletes, TSU Softball 
Team, Intramural Advisory 
Council, Dean's List, Dormi- 
tory Homecoming Commit- 
tee, intramurals. 



Bart Hendricks 
Algeron Sydney Sullivan 

Award, Phi Kappa Phi, Mor t.ir 
Board, Omicron Delta 
Kappa, Gamma Beta Phi, Phi 
Eta Sigma, Square of C Math 
Club, president; Baptist Stu- 
dent Union, Student Honors 
Advisory Council. 



Jill ). Eastin 
Gamma Beta Phi, Omu ron 

Delta Kappa, Pre ( ollege 

Orientation Leader, Student 
Council of Exceptional Chil- 
dren, SNEA, Kappa Delta So- 
rority, pledge class presi- 
dent; Fellowship of Christian 
Athletes, TSU Volleyball, in- 
tramurals. 




Gena Bentkowski 

Alpha Epsilon Delta, Stu- 
dent Government, senator; 
Campus Outreach, Phi Mu 
Fraternity, corresponding 
secretary; Pi Kappa Phi Little 
Sister, Trojan Ambassador, 
Trojan Hostess, University 
Dancers, 1986 Hawaii's Ju- 
nior Miss, 1987 Homecom- 
ing Queen. 



Ian Michael Hunt 

Alpha Lambda Delta, Gam- 
ma Beta Phi, Phi Eta Sigma, 
Mortar Board, Phi Alpha 
Theta, treasurer; Omicron 
Delta Kappa, Trojan Ambas- 
sador, IFC Judicial Board, Sig- 
ma Chi, vice president, edi- 
tor, Student Government, 
executive assistant, universi- 
ty standing committee; In- 
gall's Award Committee. 



Kelly Lisa Laroche 

Alpha Lambda Delta, Gam- 
ma Beta Phi, Kappa Delta Pi. 
Mortar Board, Phi Eta Sigma 
ISCO, secretary, president; 
Sound of South, piccolo sec- 
tion leader; Ingalls Award 
Committee, Student Coun< il 
for Exceptional Children. 



William Ladd Lewis 
Sigma Tau Delta Sigma 

Delta Chi, Troplitan. Wesley 
Foundation, president; Bap- 
tist student L nion C olle- 
giate singers. Madrigal sup- 
ers, intramurals, student As- 
sistant, sports information 
dept. 



Who- \Nho 65 



Amy Michelle Meacham 

Alpha Lambda Delta, presi- 
dent, junior advisor; Phi Eta 
Sigma, Phi Alpha Theta, vice 
president, president; Mortar 
Board, director of communi- 
cations; Phi Kappa Phi, 
Young Republicans, Ingalls 
Award Committee, Student 
English and History Tutor. 



Ralph Christopher Rich 

Alpha Psi Omega, vice 
president; Gamma Beta Phi, 
Forensics Team, Pied Pipers, 
Cast of Theater Productions, 
seven supporting roles. 



Shellie Deon Reynolds 

Mortar Board, Omicron 
Delta Kappa, Phi Alpha The- 
ta, Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha 
Lambda Delta, Angel Flight, 
ISCO, Campus Outreach, 
Kappa Delta, song leader; 
Trojan Ambassador, resident 
assistant. 



Valerie Joy Ohman 

Alpha Lambda Delta, vice 
president; Mortar Board, Phi 
Kappa Phi, Alpha Epsilon 
Delta, secretary; ISCO, Cam- 
pus Outreach, resident di- 
rector. 




'I « « *-4 




Lesley Jill Ogden 

Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi 
Eta Sigma, Gamma Beta Phi, 
president; Student Govern- 
ment, senator; Alpha Gamma 
Delta Sorority, Trojan Am- 
bassador, residence assistant, 
residence director. 



Angela Elizabeth Reisch 

Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Lamb- 
da Delta, senior advisor; Beta 
Beta Beta, Gamma Beta Phi, 
Kappa Delta Pi, second vice 
president; Phi Kappa Phi, 
SNEA, Angel Flight, ISCO, 
Baptist Student Union, Tro- 
jan Hostess, residence assis- 
tant. 



Todd Martin Lidh 

Omicron Delta Kappa, 
president; Sigma Tau Delta, 
Alpha Lambda Delta, junior 
advisor; Alpha Psi Omega, 
Young Republicans, Writing 
Center Newsletter, editor; 
speech team, Cast of Theater 
Productions, three support- 
ing roles; ISCO. 



Tracey Lynn Wright 

Kappa Delta Pi, first vice 
president; HPER Club, vice 
president; Trojan Oaks Golf 
and Racquet Club Commit- 
tee, Baptist Student Union, 
Fellowship of Christian Ath- 
letes, president; Women's 
Basketball, manager; Dean's 
List, President's List, Wom- 
en's Golf Team, NGCA Divi- 
sion II All-American. 



66 Who's Who 



American Universities and Colleges 



Daniel Kevin Dwyer 

Gamma Beta Phi, Phi Beta 
Lambda, Circle K, vice presi- 
dent; president, editor; Stu- 
dent Government, supreme 
court justice, senator; IFC, 
treasurer; Delta Chi Fraterni- 
ty, "E" board member at 
large; Debate Team. 



Susan Willoughby 

Mortar Board, secretary; Phi 
Kappa Phi, Alpha Lambda 
Delta, Gamma Beta Phi, 
Square Root of C Math Club, 
treasurer; SNEA, University 
Student Tutor of Math, 
Who's Who Among Students 
in American University and 
Colleges. 



Catherine A. Work 

Alpha Lambda Delta, edi- 
tor; Mortar Board, assistant 
sc( retary; Student Honors 
Advisory Council, Alpha Psi 
Omega, secretary, treasurer; 
Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Dean's List, President's List, 
Cast of Theather Produc- 
tions, four supporting roles. 



Jeffrey Scott Moon 
Gamma Beta Phi, Phi Alpha 
Theta, vice president; Kappa 
Delta Pi, SNEA, Trojan Am- 
bassador, Young Republi- 
cans, Sigma Chi Fraternity, 
tribune; President's List, Phi 
Theta Kappa, president, m- 
tramurals. 




Laura Inman Stephenson 

Mortar Board, president; 
Gamma Beta Phi, NAA, Tro- 
jan Ambassador, Pre College 
Orientation Leader, Alpha 
Gamma Delta Sorority, cor- 
responding secretary. 



Tammy Murden 

Alpha Lambda Delta, Mor- 
tar Board, calendar commit- 
tee; Phi Beta Lambda, Sigma 
Alpha Sigma, ISCO, Wesley 
Foundation, Campus Out- 
reach, Kappa Delta Sorority, 
scholarship chairman, stan- 
dards, house chairman, parli- 
mentarian; residence direc- 
tor. 



John Ricky Padgett 

Phi Eta Sigma, Gamma Beta 
Phi, Alpha Lambda Delta. 
secretary; Mortar Board, sec- 
retary; Omicron Delta 
Kappa, Square Root of C 
Math Club, president; Wes- 
ley Foundation, persident 
secretary; intramurals. 



Julie Michelle Thorpe 

Young Democ rates Tro- 
polilan, Student Govern- 
ment, publicity director, Chi 
Omega Sorority, president, 
secretary, pledge class vice 
president, model initiate 
Trojan Hostess, Trojan Em- 
bassador, Sigma Alpha Epsi- 
lon little sister intramurals. 



\\ ho | V\ ho 67 



John Stephen Crice 

Gamma Beta Phi, Mortar 
Board, projects chairman; 
Accounting Tutor, NAA, 
treasurer; Ingalls Award 
Committee, Chancellor 
Search Committee, IFC 
Scholarship Committee, Sig- 
ma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity, 
scholarship chairman; Alpha 
Gamma Delta Big Brother, 
Dean's List, President's List, 
Peek's Acct Scholarship. 




Kari Britt LovfaSd 

Psi Chi, Student Govern- 
ment, supreme court justice, 
senator, traffic appeals com- 
mittee; Phi Mu Sorority, pan- 
hellenic representative, sec- 
retary, scholarship chairman; 
Lambda Chi Alpha Little Sis- 
ter, resident assistant. 



Kimberly Dawn Howell 

Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi 
Eta Sigma, National Associ- 
ation of Accountants, Phi 
Beta Lambda, Trojan Hostess, 
Student Government, sena- 
tor; Chi Omega Sorority, his- 
torian, activities chairman; 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon Little 
Sister, secretary/treasurer; 
intramurals. 









fkjT 




5r" 




(& 




John Shelby Tillis III 

Gamma Beta Phi, Air Force 
ROTC, deputy commander 
of information; Arnold Air 
Force Society, vice com- 
mander; Trojanairre, deputy 
commander of information; 
Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity, 
resident assistant, Campus 
Outreach. 



Robert Shannon Frith 

Omicron Delta Kappa, Al- 
pha Lambda Delta, Beta Upsi- 
lon Sigma, vice president, 
president; Gamma Beta Phi, 
Mortar Board, Phi Kappa Phi, 
Data Processors Manage- 
ment Association, National 
Association of Accountants, 
president, director of public 
relations; Student Govern- 
ment, senator; Dean's List, 
President's List. 



Donna Jean Ivy 

Mortar Board, vice presi- 
dent; Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi Eta 
Sigma, Gamma Beta Phi, Phi 
Beta Lambda, treasurer; Tro- 
jan Hostess, Kappa Delta So- 
rority, president, editor, best 
sister award; President's List, 
Dean's List, George C. Wal- 
lace Leadership Scholarship, 
Blount Scholarship, intra- 
murals. 




Rosalinda Skeen 

Alpha Lambda Delta, sec- 
retary, senior advisor; Phi Al- 
pha Theta, historian; ISCO, 
music chairman; Lyceum 
Committee, Young Republi- 
cans, secretary; Speech 
Team, Scholar's Award to 
TSU, TSU Oxford Summer 
Scholar. 



Jace Everett Albury 

Square Root of C Math 
Club, Pre-Med and Allied 
Health Club, Student Gov- 
ernment, university standing 
committee; Sigma Chi Fra- 
ternity, president, assistant 
pledge trainer, sergeant at 
arms; line judge for TSU Vol- 
leyball Team, residence hall 
security, intramurals. 



68 Who's Who 



American Universities and Colleges 



Patrick Lee Hall 

Omicron Delta Kappa, Al- 
pha Psi Omega, Art Guild, In- 
galls Award Committee, Bap- 
tist Student Union, presi- 
dent; Opera Workshop, two 
lead roles; Pied Pipers, Cast 
of Theatre Productions, 
three lead roles and seven 
supporting roles; Chipola Jr. 
College, SGA, senator, presi- 
dent; Phi Kappa, Show Choir. 



Jennifer Lyn Birks 

Alpha Lambda Delta, Sig- 
ma Alpha lota, correspond- 
ing secretary, treasurer; 
Wesley Foundation, secre- 
tary, spiritual growth officer; 
Sound of the South Band, 
section leader, secretary, 
public relations, rifle captain; 
Collegiate Singers, intramur- 
als, Honors Council. 



Leslie Anne Jones 
Alpha Psi Omega, Trojan 
Ambassador, Pre-College 
( )i ientation I cider , Alpha 
Gamma Delta Sororit) . < Kap- 
ler house chairman, < haptei 
social chairman, Sigma Chi 
I raternity Little Sister, ( olle- 
giate Singers, Pied Pipers, 
Cast of Theatre Productions, 
three lead roles; Homecom- 
ing Court. 



Jeffrey Preston 

Phi I t.i Sigma, Mpha l amb- 
da Delta, Gamma Beta Phi, 
Mortar Board, Beta I psilon 
Sigma, Phi kappa Phi, Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa, ACUB, 
vice chairman, chairman; 
IFC, treasurer, Sigma Pi, trea- 
surer, president 




Deborah Jean McGill 

Trojan Ambassador, Stu- 
dent Government, presi- 
dent, clerk, senator; Tropoli- 
tan, Campus Outreach, Chi 
Omega Sorority, panhellenic 
representative, social chair- 
man, pledge class president; 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon Pledge 
Class Sweetheart. 



Anita Joyce Mcknight 

Phi Kappa Phi, Mortar 
Board, Kappa Delta Pi, sec re- 
tary; ACEI, SNEA, Baptist Stu- 
dent Union, intramurals. 



Laura V. Leverette Matthew Calvin MinglM 

Alpha Lambda Delta, trea- Square Root of C Math 

surer; Phi Eta Sigma, Omi- Club, Pre Med Club, Pre Col- 

cron Kappa Delta, Phi Kappa lege- Orientation leader. 

Phi, Mortar Board. Kappa University Math Tutor, Sigma 

Delta Pi, Square Root of C Alpha Epsilon Fraternity, 

Math Club, Trojan Ambassa- rush chairman. 2nd I t 
dor, Chi Omega Sororit\, 
\ k e president, assistant 
pledge trainer, song leader. 

Collegiate Singers, Opera 

Workshop, Who's Who, 
President's list, Dean's List. 



v\ ho i \\ ho 69 



Who's Who Among Students in 
American Universities and Colleges 



Not Shown 



Tiffany Elise McDonald 

Beta Beta Beta, treasurer; 
Sigma Alpha lota, chaplain; 
Square Root of C Math Club, 
secretary; Young Demo- 
crates, secretary, treasurer; 
Wesley Foundation, public- 
ity officer; Collegiate Singers, 
Madrigal Singers, Cast of 
Theater Productions. 



Rebecca Jean Brown 

Gamma Beta Phi, Omicron 
Delta Kappa, Trojan Ambas- 
sador, Alpha Gamma Delta, 
panhellenic representative, 
junior panhellenic represen- 
tative; Sigma Chi Fraternity 
Little Sister, Dean's List, 
Cheerleader, intramurals. 

Stacey Alise Clark 

Phi Kappa Phi, Gamma 
Beta Phi, Mortar Board, Sig- 
ma Tau Delta, vice president; 
Trojan Hostess, residence as- 
sistant, Campus Outreach, 
Writing Center Tutor. 



Debbie A. Barber 

Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Gamma Beta Phi, Circle K, 
secretary; Trojan Hostess, 
Student Nursing Association, 
secretary, vice president, 
president; Dean's List, Presi- 
dent's List, George C. Wal- 
lace President's Award, 

Kim Sherree Desmond 

Alpha Phi Sigma, presi- 
dent; Mortar Board, Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa, Lambda 
Alpha Epsilon, vice presi- 
dent, president; Student 
Government, senator; Alpha 
Gamma Delta Sorority. 



Randall Thomas Chitwood 

Gamma Beta Phi, presi- 
dent; Student Government 
at TSU Montgomery, presi- 
dent, vice president; School 
of Nursing, writer; University 
Evaluation Committee, Uni- 
versity Tutor. 



Bernadette Hetzel 

Gamma Beta Phi, Kappa 
Delat Pi, HPER, Fellowship of 
Christian Athletes, TSU Vol- 
leyball Team, intramurals, 
residence assistant, trainer. 



70 Who's Who 



Who's Who 

AMONG STUDENTS IN 
/unerican T Tniversities 

&. (Colleges 



Each year Troy State University recognizes 
a select group of students by electing them to 
Who's Who in American Universities and 
Colleges. The University's selection commit- 
tee is appointed by Chancellor Adams, and 
includes representatives recommended by 
the dean of each school and college within 
the University and from the Division of Stu- 
dent Affairs. 

All members of TSU faculty, staff, and ad- 
ministration are requested to nominate stu- 
dents whose academic achievement, partici- 
pation and leadership in academic and extra- 
curricular activities, citizenship and service 
to the University, and promise of future use- 
fulness are deserving of special recognition. 
The selection committee evaluates each 
nominee and selects the most deserving stu- 
dents for inclusion in Who's Who. 





V\ ho | \N ho ~ 1 



Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award 





Top: Bart Hendricks, Dr. John M. 
Long, Annemarie Bell and Dr. Ralph 
Adams. 



The citation presented to 
Bart Hendricks states, "Bart 
Fletcher Hendricks always 
has a smile on his face, a 
courteous attitude toward 
his fellow man, and a pleas- 
ant, helpful conscientious- 
ness toward people: those 
characteristics representa- 
tive of the Algernon Sydney 
Sullivan Award. In positions 
of leadership, he has origi- 
nated and developed ideas 
and has led students with re- 
spect and dignity. Those 
around him respond to his 
joy, contentment, and reli- 
gious faith and these qualities 
inspire and uplift them." 



The citation presented to Dr. 
Long states, "Through high 
ideas and impeccable per- 
sonal character, John Maloy 
Long has inspired, motivat- 
ed, and encouraged genera- 
tions of students and profes- 
sionals in the field of music. 
He tries each day to be the 
very best husband, father, 
teacher, friend, and person 
that he can be. His greatest 
joy is helping other people, a 
quality highly recognized by 
the Algernon Sydney Sulli- 
van Award. His greatest con- 
tributions are the scores of 
people he has stirred to 
emulate his personal dedica- 
tion to excellence." 



The citation presented to 
Annemarie Bell states, "An- 
nemarie Bell is the epitome 
of what American youth 
should be and is a loyal and 
true friend to those who 
know her best. She is dedi- 
cated to her God, her family, 
her friends, and meets every 
task with diligence and fer- 
vor. Though quiet man- 
nered, she has very strong 
convictions which are evi- 
dent in her daily living and 
reflect those ideals which are 
recognized by the Algernon 
Sydney Sullivan Award." 



72 Algernon Sydney Sullivan 



Ingalls Award 




The recipient of the 1989 In- 
galls Award for Excellence in 
Classroom Teaching, the 
highest honor a Troy State 
University faculty member 
can receive was Dr. Robert L. 
Pullen. The Ingalls Award 
consists of $1000 and a 
plaque presented by the In- 
galls Foundation of Birming- 



ham. The Foundation sup- 
ports quality teaching in col- 
leges and universities. 

Composing the selection 
committee was a group of 
students each representing 
his own academic discipline. 
The members select the re- 
cipient through a series of 
lengthy meetings, narrowing 



the many applicants to only 
three or four finalists. Then 
after the finalists are ob- 
served in their classrooms by 
the committee members, 
one finalist is chosen. The 
choice is often very difficult 
because of the outstanding 
finalists. 



Top: Or R.ilph Adams and Dr 
Robert L. Pullen. 



Ingalls 4vtard ~i 



t ttyo4t&i4, & o*tv&c4tco4i 



The awards received at 
Honors Convocation in- 
clude: Stacey Clark, Benard 
E. Williams Award for Excel- 
lence in English; Dan Bla- 
lock, Jr. Colonial Dames of 
America Paper Award; Troy 
King, The Professor Ray 
Mathes Award; Shellie 
Reynolds, Leonard Y. Trapp 
Memorial Award; Bart Hen- 
dricks, Virgil L. Collins 
Mathematics Award; Doug- 
las Johnson, Outstanding 
AFROTC Senior Cadet; 
Christy Curington, PEAK 
Freshman Award; Steve 
Grice, Alabama's Society of 
CPAs Accounting Student 
Award; Debra S. Thrash, 
Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship 
Key; Casaundra D. Junius, Phi 
Gamma Nu Scholarship Key; 
Laurs Inman Stephenson, 
Wall Street Journal Student 
Achievement Award; Shar- 
on Kranz, The Eulene Haw- 



kins Social Work Award; 
Bernadette Hetzel, Health, 
Physical Education and Re- 
creation and Dance Aca- 
demic Honor Award; Bar- 
bara Woolard, W.P. Lewis 
Outstanding Junior in Edu- 
cation Award; Anita 
McKnight, R.H. Ervin Out- 
standing Senior in Education 
Award; Janet Jones, Tex 
Whaley Association of 
Childhood Education 
Award; Susan Story Brown, 
Sigma Alpha lota Honor 
Award and Outstanding 
Music Graduate Award; 
Robin Stenger, Art and Clas- 
sics Award for Scholarship 
and Artistic Achievement; 
Ralph Christopher Rich, Al- 
pha Psi Omega Scholastic 
Award; Vicki Hyatt, Out- 
standing Graduate in Jour- 
nalism; Marshall Ashby, Jr., 
Georgia Irene Gill Davis Me- 
morial Award; Alpha Gam- 



ma Delta, Panhellenic Schol- 
arship Award; Tau Kappa Ep- 
silon, Interfraternity 

Scholastic Award; James 
Clem, The James Burns Cle- 
ments Award; Tracey 
Wright, The Sorrell Award; 
Mark Alessandroni, The 
Golden Key Award; Lance 
Wallace, Alpha Lambda Del- 
ta Outstanding Freshman 
Award; John Padgett, Faye 
Ellis Memorial Award; 
Tammy Schofield, Phi Kappa 
Phi Outstanding Junior 
Award; Amy Meacham, Eric 
Rodgers Phi Beta Kappa As- 
sociation Award; Jodi Shank, 
Oxford Scholarship 1989 Fe- 
male Award; Todd Lidh, Ox- 
ford Scholarship 1989 Male 
Award. Award winners enjoy 
conversing with each other 
after the Honors Convoca- 
tion. 




74 Honors Convocation 



Ki 
ey 
Pa 
Bo 

( el 



Rht 




Honor". ConvocatM 



Honors 




Top: Ralph Christopher 
Rich receives the Alpha Psi 
Omega Scholastic Award. 




The cream of Troy State 
University's academic crop 
showed what happens when 
you plant your goals in solid 
ground . . . The Council of 
Honor Societies sponsored 
the annual Honors Convoca- 
tion and presented awards 
for outstanding scholastic 
achievement. 

According to Dr. Emma 
Norris, the convocation gives 
everyone a chance to be to- 
gether. "The Honors Convo- 
cation is the one time when 
the whole University has a 
chance to get together and 
recognize academic accom- 
plishments," Norris said. 
"The focus is on student 
achievement and it's impor- 
tant that we understand that 
we are an academic team." 

Lance Wallace, an 18-year- 



old from Lake Wales, Fla., 
won the Alpha Lamda Delta 
Outstanding Freshman 
Award and was surprised 
when he was notified of the 
honor. 

"I thought it was exciting 
that they would recognize a 
freshman." Wallace said. "A 
lot of times, an institution 
doesn't recognize freshman 
at all, but through that honor 
it gives motivation to stu- 
dents and shows that the 
University cares." 

The Ingalls Award for Ex- 
cellence in classroom teach- 
ing was awarded to Dr. Rob- 
ert Pullen, an associate pro- 
fessor of sociology. "I was 
very pleased because the 
award is the students' evalua- 
tion of my work and that's 
who I work for," Pullen said. 



The most prestigious 
award given is the Algrenon 
Sydney Sullivan award and is 
presented to the two most 
well-rounded students in 
academics and extra-cirricu- 
lar activities and one teacher. 

Annemarie Bell of Flor- 
ence and Bart Fletcher Hen- 
dricks of Jay, Fla. won this 
year's top student award and 
Dr. John M. Long of Troy 
won the teacher's Sullivan 
honor. 

Vicki Hyatt, who won the 
Outstanding Journalism Stu- 
dent Award, says all the hard 
work paid off. 

"This means more to me 
than anyother I have ever 
won," Hyatt said. "It made all 
the hard work worthwhile." - 
by Kim Wickline, contribut- 
ing writer. 



76 Honors Convocation 



Convocation 




Top Left: Robm Stengw receives 

The Art and Classics Award for Artis- 
tic Achievement from Dr. Robert 
Stampfli. 



Top Right: Dr Charles (one. pre- Bottom: Mr- Carol Kimbl 
sents to Freddie Brooks the Mpha handsout the kappa Delta Pi awards 
Phi Sigma Criminal lustite Honor 
Graduate ward. 



Hon 




78 Classes 




Classes 



There are as many ideas, lifestyles and personalities as there are faces on the 
campus. 

Whether Greek or independent, American or foreign, the students who com- 
prise the campus are a lesson in diversity. 

The face of people of 1989, a veritable melting pot, left us with many lasting 
impressions. 











Derek Brown 
Heath DeRamus 
Cara English 
Tim Jacobs 
Ed Moseley 
Donald Norsworthy 
Photographers 



Carry Cannon 
Section Editor 



Lori Dean 
Heath DeRamus 
Amy Evans 
Lori Featheringill 

Dean Kervin 

Amanda Merrill 
Lisa Palmisano 
Kyle Smith 
Jennifer Sohn 
Vince Stanshur\ 
Mk helle Waddingtofi 
Beth Weatherford 
Contributing Editors 






FRESHMEN 




ABBOTT, KEELYMA; Lithonia, GA 

ABERCROMBIE, WILLIAM; Douglas, GA 

ADAIR, CHERYL; Goshen, AL 

ADAMS, CHRISTI; Vero Beach, FL 

ADAMS, CHRISTOPHER; Clayton, AL 

ADAMS, JASON; Headland, AL 

ADAMS, MICHAEL; Odenville, AL 

ADAMS, STEPHANIE; Troy, AL 

ADAMS, WARD; Crestview, FL 

ADAMS, WILLIAM; Birmingham, AL 

ALLEN, DONALD; Lanett, AL 

ALLEN, MICHAEL; Hudson, FL 

ALLEN, WILLIAM; Wetumpka, AL 

ALLMAN, PATRICIA; Dothan, AL 

ALLOWAY, VALERI; Troy, AL 

ALLSUP, CHARLES; Cottonwood, AL 

ANDREWS, CEMIRI; Greenville, AL 

ARMER, SHANNON; Rockledge, FL 

ARMSTRONG, RAY; Troy, AL 

ARMSTRONG, ROBERT; Graceville, FL 

ARMSTRONG, TANYA; Troy, AL 

ARRINGTON, TAYNA; Union Springs, AL 

ARTHUR, CAROLANN; Troy, AL 

ASGEDOM, PEDROS; Tampa, FL 

ATCHISON, ROBERT; Moody, AL 

ATCHISON, TRACI; Salitpa, AL 

AUSTIN, ANTHONY; Troy, AL 

AUSTIN, IRIS; Decatur, GA 

AVANT, CHRIS; Troy, AL 

AVERY, WENDY; Slocomb, AL 

AYCOCK, THOMAS; Milledgeville, GA 

BADGETT, MELISSA; Thornton, TX 

BAGLEY TIM, Branford; FL 

BAGGETT, JERRY; Troy, AL 

BAGGLEY, BETTINA; Kissimmee, FL 

BAGLEY, GINA; Thomasville, AL 

BAILEY, BRANTON; Andalusia, AL 

BAKER, GREG; Lakeland, FL 

BAKER, KIMBERLY; Andalusia, AL 

BALDWIN, JAMES; Fairhope, AL 

BALDWIN, RUSSELL; Fairhope, AL 

BALLARD, RANDALL; Georgiana, AL 

BALMER, CHRISTINE; Troy, AL 

BARFIELD, AMANDA; Dothan, AL 

BARR, CHERYL; Banks, AL 

BARR, DAVID; Midlothian, VA 

BARRINGTON JEROME; Prattville, AL 

BARRON, JEFFREY; Troy, AL 

BARROW, PATRICIA; Brunddidge, AL 

BARTON SHONA; North Ft. Myers, FL 

BARBER, TAMMY; Shorter, AL 

BASS, BARBARA; Smiths, AL 

BAXLEY, DARREN; Tallahassee, FL 

BAXLEY, SHEILA; Banks, AL 

BEATY, CHRISTOPHER; Louisville, AL 

BEAVERS, DAN; Killen, AL 

BELCHER, JASON; Mount Olive, AL 

BELL, ROLAND; Elba, AL 

BENCHABBAT, DANIEL; Indilantic, FL 

BENNETT, BARBARA; Brundidge, AL 

BENNETT, TRACY; Wetumpka, AL 

BERGLOFF, ROBERT; Bradenton, FL 

BERRY, KOTTNIE; Winston, AL 







* V 





k/k 



™™^l 



W^j-Hi 




S\\r''l 



80 Freshmen 



«*ff1*firt' 




HI I IV BARB-VR \ Ml AL 

BEVERLY, lllllkl v Florence ai 
BIBB 5HANI I I -V Moi M 

Bl< I DONNA; Fairl 

BiKks i m kii Seminole ai 

BISHOP AMV I -if [>in Spring 

BLACK \m> Brundidge ai 

BLACK. RALPH 

Hi M k si s.\n Donalsonville, CA 

BLACK. WILLIAM; IVoy, AL 

BLALOCK. JIM, Baket H 

HI \MIK KATHLEEN l"ro) M 

BLAKEY, MAR 1 ! ANNl M.,< AL 

BLAndinc. mariha Montgomery al 

BLEDSOE, THOMAS; Eufaula. AL 
BLEDSOE. WILLIAM; Eufaula, Al 
BLOCKER. RANDY; Mobile, Al 
BODIFORD. MARK Excel, AL 
BOGAN ( YNTHIA; Mobile al 
BOGIV SONJA Greenville, AL 
BOHannon \\u Okeechobee H 

BOOTH, RICHARD; Tros Al 
BOTHWIll KIMBIRIV Tr... Al 
How l\ IOHN; tehford M 
BOWEN KRIs Til Donalsonville. GA 

Bouts hmothy n 

HOW IN VICKII Tto) M 

BOWIRMAN MARY BITH R. public ol Panam 

BOYETT, JAMES; Daleville, AL 
BR AC KIN ( HAD I 
BRA< kin i awinda Headland, al 
BRADSHAW, |ANA Headland Al 

BRADY IINNIIIR. Duluth. I 

BR ANNIN ELIZABI TH Frostproot. FL 

BRANTIO ANDRIW Trcn. AL 

BRAZILE, HEATHER; Longwood. FL 
BREWER MARY I Mil > Satellite Beach. FL 
BRIWIR mic ah Winston Al 
BRK I WILLIAM Grayson, Al 
BRISLIN RICHARD Deatsvik 
BROADWAY rRACY Montgome- 
BROOKs AM, 1 1 •. m 

BROOKS. Christina LandoUkes Fi 

BROOKs IOHN \,!, GA 
BROOKS TRI> H VI 

BROS! andriw Lakeland Fi 

BROSNAHAM HINR> Tr.n AL 
BROWN BI1INDV Dothan Al 
BROWN ( HARI II ; l FL 

BROWN DONALD • FI 

BROWN SI 5AN TRO'i Al 

BRI NSON Ml< HAEI ' AL 

HRl Ns()\ i \MM> v 

BR 1 ! AN T ABITHA Elba Al 

BRY ant DAVID MONTGOMERY M 

BR\ ant MARY HI in rro) Al 

HI |( F I INN A |0 snelKille 

HI II MID RK k> Huntsville Al 
Hi Hoc K HAROLD fto) Al 
Hi Hoc K WILLIAM Pinckard AL 
Hi K(,|ss VNDRI Gordon, Al 
Hi RINSKAS IInnihr Daleville, Al 
Hi KKls IAYMII c enterville ai 



IRIsHMfN 81 



BURKHALTER, SHELLILE; Childersburgh, AL 

BURNETT, BRANDY; Andalusia, AL 

BURNETT, PATRICIA; Dosier, AL 

BUSH, BEVERLY; Hope Hull, AL 

BUSH, JODI; Mt. Vernon, AL 

BUTTEREIELD, THOMAS; Montgomery, AL 

BUTTS, FELISHA; Luverne, AL 

BYRD, KECIA; Troy, AL 

CADDELL, ELIZABETH; Prattville, AL 

CAGLE, CHRISTOPHER; Mobile, AL 

CAMPBELL, CAMELLA; Prattville, AL 

CANEER, JULIE; Huntsville, AL 

CAPPS, KELLI; Headland, AL 

CAPSTRAW, JASON; Orlando, FL 

CARAWAY, DEBORAH; Clayton, AL 

CARPENTER, LISA; Palm Beach, FL 

CARROLL, CHRISTOPHER; Grady, AL 

CARTER, KEVIN; Lynn Haven, FL 

CARTER, TOBI; Eufaula, AL 

CARTER, SAMANTHA; Florala, AL 

CELKA, MICHAEL; Wetumpka, AL 

CHANCE, JASON; Alachua, FL 

CHANCEY, DEANNA; Grady, AL 

CHASTAIN, JERRY; Jackson, AL 

CHUNN, NELLIE; Uriah, AL 

CHRISTOPHER, PAIGE; Wetumpka, AL 

CIAMBOR, JAMES; Prattville, AL 

CLARK, CHRISTY; Andalusia, AL 



CLARK, CRAIG; Alexander City, AL 

CLAUSELL, VALENCIA; Mobile, AL 

CLAWSON, MICHELLE; Trussville, AL 

CLECKLER, JEFFERY; Clanton, AL 



CLECKLER, KEVIN; Clanton, AL 

CLECKLER, TANYA; Montgomery, AL 

CLIFTON, KELLY; Rockledge, FL 

COBB, ELIZABETH; Fitzgerald, GA 



COBB, GREGORY; Ozark, AL 

COHEN, MICHAEL; Jacksonville, FL 

COLAPIERTO, CHRISTOPHER; 

Montgomery, AL 

COLE, CONN; Moultrie, GA 



COLEMAN, AMELIA; Troy, AL 

COLLIER, CHARLES; Macon, GA 

COLLINS, SCOTT; Lake City, FL 

COLVARD, MARY; Eclectic, AL 



COLUMNA, AARON; Valdosta, GA 

CONNELL, MELANIE; Troy, AL 

CONNELL, TINA; Brundidge, AL 

CONRAD, MICHAEL; Ocala, AL 



COOK, CATRINA; Minter, AL 
COOK, LAURA; Wauchula, FL 
COOK, MICHAEL; Albany, GA 
COOK, SANDRA; Warrior, AL 




82 Freshmen 




( OPI insi v Goshen, M 
( OPEI *ND, ( HRIS; ftey, m 

( orbit r, jiiiirv Shalinw, n 
( ORDES, \urv M< . m 

( OKI IV V M ISA; Mlanta, CA 

COSIAN JIIIKI V If-.j. ; LA 

COTTON. WM II R rrO) M 

Crawford. John. Enterprise, N 
CRENSHAW, < \SSANDRA Montgomei 

CROL SHORN JOHN, Tjlljhdss.-i-. fl 
( Kl 1( MIR MARY, Athens. AL 

( i ( mon maria, Enterprise! m 
CULBRI IH, riMOTHY; r aJlal 
CULVER, RONALD; lade, AL 

CUNNINGHAM, PALL, Lakeland, FL 
CURINCTON ( HRISTY; L mon Springs, Al 
( I RRII KRISTIN, Birmingham, AL 
CURRY, PRIM E; Mt Dora, FL 
CURRY, JUDITH, Troy, AL 
CURTO, ANDRI V \ era B.d( h FL 
CWALINA, KRISTIN, Palm Bas II 

DAILEY, CHERLY; St Petersburg, FL 
DAMRON. JIM, Montgomery, AL 
DANNER, HI VTHER; Anton. M 
[MNNIR MARC; Dothan, AL 
DARNELL, CHRISTINI Dothan, AL 
DASHER, THEE; Brewton, M 
DAUCHTERTY, KEVIN, Cape Coral, FL 



7?£id4ca*uvice4 <ut t&e ^eac£ 



Summer Beach Project, 
ten weeks of living, playing, 
working, and learning to- 
gether with other college 
students, is a program de- 
signed to help Christians 
build a solid foundation in 
their faith through intensive 
Bible study and evangelism. 

In addition, the program 
seeks to train and equip stu- 
dents to be the most effec- 
tive missionaries for Christ, 
not only at the beach and on 
college campuses, but also 
for the rest of their lives. 

Troy State's Summer 
Beach Project, sponsored by 
Campus Outreach, is held at 
Hermitage Condominiums in 
Ft. Walton Beach, Florida. 
Students from Valdosta State 
and Livingston also partici- 
pate in the program at Ft. 
Walton. Each student works 
35-40 hours a week to cover 
the costs of rent, food and 



other necessities. The job 
teaches responsibility, de- 
pendability , and exposure to 
the "real" world. 

"The experience of Beach 
Project helped me to build 
responsibility, to be inde- 
pendent and to share my 
faith with others," said one 
TSU participant. 

Summer Beach Projrc I 
created an environment that 
challenged the participants 
to grow into mature disciples 
of Christ through Bible 
study, prayer, witnessing 
leadership training and min- 
istering in local churches. 

Campus OutrecH h is an in- 
terdenominational ministr\ 
on college campuses in Ala- 
bama and Georgia. The Cam- 
pus Outreach staff is under 
the superv ision of Bnarwood 
Presb\tenan Church in Bir- 
mingham, Alabama. 



Freshmen 83 



DAVENPORT, PATRICK; Troy, AL 

COOLEY, SHARON; Heflin, AL 

DAVIS, ANDREW; Bonifay, FL 

DAVIS, BRIAN; Atmore, AL 

DAVIS, DACRE; Troy, AL 

DAVIS, DARCY; Davie, FL 

DAVIS, LEARTIS; Brundridge, AL 

DAVIS, SADIE; Minter, AL 

DAVIS, SANDRA; Troy, AL 

DAVISON, ANGELA; Ft. Deposit, AL 

DAWSON, DANIEL; Union Springs, AL 

DAY, JAMES; Gadsden, AL 

DEAN, LORI; Wetumpka, AL 

DEASE, EMILY; Troy, AL 

DEAVOR, KIMBERLY; Selma, AL 

DEBOSE, HOPE; Troy, AL 

DEBROSSE, LOUIS; Sarasota, FL 

DEFEE, LEONARD; Rutledge, AL 

DEFELICIBUS, GREGG; Homestead, FL 

DEFONTAINE, JEAN; Sarasota, FL 

DEMOSS, TONYA; Spanish Fort, AL 

DENEVE, CHAD; Winter Springs, FL 

DENNIS, NADINNA; Enterprise, AL 

DENNIS, TAMMY; Opelika, AL 

DENT, STEPHEN; Prattville, AL 

DERAMUS, DALLAS; Troy, AL 

DICKERSON, IVY; Webb, AL 

DIDELOT, ROGER; Montgomery, AL 

DIGGS, CAROLYN; Banks, AL 

DINGMAN, TERI; Millbrook, AL 

DIXON, STANLEY; Blacksher, GA 

DODLEY, DONNA; Selma, AL 

DODSON, ROBERT; Huntsville, AL 

DOLLAR, LISA; Montgomery, AL 

DONALDSON, TALITHA; Montgomery, AL 

DUCOTE, PAULA; Troy, AL 

DUFFY, MARY JO; Cocoa Beach, FL 

DUNCAN, TRACY; Enterprise, AL 

DYAL, DONNA; Milton, FL 

DYESS, CHERYL; Dothan, AL 

DYKEMA, JENNIFER; Troy, AL 

DYKES, EDWARD; Montgomery, AL 

DYSON, RACHEL; Point Clear, AL 

EARLY, STEPHEN; Foley, AL 

ECKERT, CINDY; Montgomery, AL 

EDMONDSON, JOANNA; Opelika, AL 

EDWARDS, BRIDGETTE; Mobile, AL 

EDWARDS, TIMOTHY; Verbena, AL 

EGBUNA, GLORIA; Montgomery, AL 

EILAND, ASHLEY; Brantley, AL 

EILAND, ROBBIE; Troy, AL 

ELLINGTON, DEREK; Enterprise, AL 

ELLILNGTON, TRACY; Eufaula, AL 

ELLIOTT, MICHAEL; Americus, GA 

ELLIS, JONATHAN; Montgomery, AL 

ELLIS, LAURIE; Mobile, AL 

ELLIS, MARGARET; Montgomery, AL 

ELLSWORTH, RONALD; Brundidge, AL 

ERICKSON, ANDREW; Montgomery, AL 

ERICSON, SAMANTHA; Sarasota, FL 

ESKRIDGE, CELESTE; Troy, AL 

ESTIVAREZ, FEDERICO; Santa Cruz, Bolivia 

EVANS, AMY; Archer, FL 

EVANS, THERESA; Dothan, AL 

EZELL, ANITA; Huntsville, AL 

FAILS, MARY LOU; Selma, AL 

FAIRCLOTH, CAROL; Eufaula, AL 

FALKENBERRY, SUSIE; Valley, AL 

FALLIS, ANDREW; Vero Beach, FL 

FARMER, MICHAEL; Ozark, AL 




84 Freshmen 




FARMIk KODNh. \i\. . 

I arm 111 (,ki(,o West Blo ton, Al 

I \kk\k I'lkkV Iim. M 

I arrow IONATHAN; Pain Bay Fl 
FALlk STEPHANII Honoraville, Al 

FALIkSlk. IISMIIk l>... M 
FAULkSlk KEITH; Union Spring. M 

FAUlkMk NAOMI; Mi • M 

FEITSMA DAVIO < hlpk 

FENTON STANLEY Laki land H 

iik(,i son Dikis West Melbourne, n 

Hkkv |AMES Exetei mi 

mi l ns kli m Brewton M 

FIOKI ZANI Mm- M 

FISH rERESA Marietta GA 
FITCERALD, riMOTHY; Demopolrs, AL 

FLEFMk. ASDRIW II 

FOLEY, ROGER; Long Island, S> 
FOLMAR, IASON; Im,. m 
FORMAN PATRK la, H 

lOkll M Mis'! \ Tro) M 

FOSHEE, SUSAN, Mexander Dty, Al 

FOWLER, DOSS * M 

FOWI Ik. I MNII Opelika, AL 
FOXWORTH 5TEVEN Dothan, M 
FRASMIS ( HARI 1^ !".. \l 
FRATlk DONNA Dothan m 

f RAZIER. ST A< Y \l 

FREELAND, REBECCA; Troy M 
FREEMAN, MARY; Opelika, \l 

FREE MAS St SAN Mi Al 

I RID AN MOSICA; Sardiv Al 
FRIER. HI ATHIR L.k.-land. FL 
GABALDOs PATRICIA Mjburndale, Fl 
GANN IAMES; West Palm B.d< h Fl 

GARDNER. SN I \ I A. Montgomery Al 
GARSlk ( HIMANI St P< tersburg H 
GARRIT7 MMBIRIN Airehville Al 
GASHAW, STACI; Doth.r 
GAUSS, STEPHEN Quincy Fl 
c.l \ IK> Rl SSELI (emison M 
GlBSOs mii ash Selma \i 

GILL, GREGORY; Milton II 

GILL, ROBERT; Winter Haven, FL 

GILLEY, TODD; Lena, IL 

GlLLil asd PAIGE; Prattvilk 

OGIIRON Dassn Marietta, GA 

Gl \SS KODsn Mob • 

GOL RDISI ASCII A M \l 

GRA^ C II MIST C antonmcnt, FL 
GREEN MURKY 

GRElk BENJAMIN Ellenwood I 
GODWis Bin Montgomery ai 
GODWis ( HERYI Greenvi 
GODUls shirri Huxford Al 
GODWis timothn Bank) M 

GOERZEM. DEBORAH; Brun- 
GOLDIS Rill Bank- Al 
GOLDEN SARAH Bank, Al 
GOLDEN SI SAN Iroy Al 
GOLIBIEWSKI Ml< HAEI H 

GON2 mi.' I mhirisi Brandon Fl 

GOODMAN iihrin Montezumi 

GRAHAM kimbi Ri y KalispeU mi 
GR \si \si.ii \ Lou sville, Al 

i.K \\ Is GINA Montfl <■■ | 

i,k\n DANIEI Lanetl Al 
GRAy LESLE\ laltosee Al 
( .K \Y MARK 
GREGORY IASON I Al 



on 85 



GREEN, JAMES; Haynesville, AL 

GREEN, JERRY; Eufaula, AL 

GREEN, RISA; Tallahassee, FL 

GREEN, ROBERT; Fairhope, AL 

GREENLEE, SHAWN; Dothan, AL 

GRIFFIN, DONNA; Troy, AL 

GRIFFIN, MALVIA; Brundidge, AL 

GRIFFIN, TRACEY; Troy, AL 

GRIFFIN, SHARON; Clayton, AL 

GRIMES, JAMES; Elba, AL 

GRIMSLEY, KIMBERLY; Dothan, AL 

GRISWOLD, ANGIE; Banks, AL 

GRISWOLD, TYSON; Troy, AL 

GRANTHAM, SELENA; Newton, AL 

GROEGER, OLIVER; Berlin, Germany 

GRUMMER, KELLY; Colusa, CA 

GUTIERREZ, JULIE; Lakeland, FL 

GUY, NIACOLE; Meridian, MS 

HAAS, FRANK; Fairhope, AL 

HALCOMB, JULIE; Dothan, AL 

HALE, LOLETA; Ft. Deposit, AL 

HALL, LORI; Milton, FL 

HALL, JASON; Union Springs, AL 

HALL, MICHAEL; Union Springs, AL 

HALL, TUJUANIA; Troy, AL 

HALLEY, JULIE; Troy, AL 

HALSTEAD, CARLA; Dothan, AL 

HAMM, PAMELA; Troy, AL 

HANSON, DONALD; Troy, AL 

HARDEN, CLAUDINE; Okeechobee, FL 

HARDEN, LISA; Banks, AL 

HARDEN, TINA; Guntersville, AL 

HARKINS, TOMI; Montevallo, AL 

HARPER, DEANA; Montgomery, AL 

HARPER, LANCE; Longwood, FL 

HARPER, MARY; Ozark, AL 

HARPER, STEPHANIE; Andalusia, AL 

HARRELSON, CHARLES; Andalusia, AL 

HARRINGTON, GARYN; Burke, AL 

HARRIS, BARBARA; Montgomery, AL 

HARRIS, JOVETTA; Northport, AL 

HARRIS, MARION; Centerville, AL 

HARRIS, PENNY; Troy, AL 

HARRIS, VALERIA; Brewton, AL 

HARTLEY, KELLY; Midfield, AL 

HASSELL, MICHAEL; Orlando, FL 

HASTINGS, KIMBERLY; Burke, VA 

HATTEN, PAMELA; Troy, AL 

HAWK, RHONDA; Troy, AL 

HAYGOOD, JOSEPH; Jacksonville, FL 

HAYNES, CHAUNCY; Pensacola, FL 

HEALY, JOHN; Ft. Meyers, FL 

HECK, DAWN; Ft. Campbell, KY 

HEITER, JOSEPH; Mobile, AL 

HELMS, DOROTHY; Glenwood, AL 

HENDERSON, ANGELA; Goshen, AL 

HENDERSON, BETH; Elba, AL 

HENDERSON, JUAN; Troy, AL 

HENDRICKS, KATHLEEN; Seminole, FL 

HENLEY, PAUL; Troy, AL 

HENRY, MICHAEL; Frankfurt, Germany 

HERIOT, DARLENE; Pensacola, FL 

HEWETT, JEANNIE; Chattahoochee, FL 

HEWITT, TIMOTHY; St. Petersburg, FL 

HICKS, CHAD; Fairhope, AL 

HIGGINS, KECIA; Lithonia, GA 

HILL, BRIAN; Carrollton, GA 

HILL, CHARLES; Meridian, MS 

HILLMAN, MACK; Neely, MS 

HINCKLEY, CATHERINE; Tallahassee, FL 



"W 




*N ' W 



86 Freshmen 



17 f 










ft *"A £ (U 11 



,;-->?, 






UjJTI A A! PH 
f ' , r 1 5 2TCTT1 



HISls ( ARI V Opp Al 

HINSON, IR \< i> Monroeville, m 
hioi i ikk . West Blot ton M 
HOBBS, DANAj K. Al 

HODCI n(i Millbrool ai 
HODGES, WAITER;" i. At 

mom man ii i/abi in Dothan, At 

hoi i ada-i jo> Montevallo ai 
noil ■\M) DAPHNI Eufaula, Al 
HOLLEY, mk HAEI I"-. Al 
MOIl INOIR ( IDRK ;M • Al 

HOII INS Mil Issa Ml Al 

hoiiow av mrri. Snellvilk 
HOLMIS IRIDRK k Pei » ola, Fl 

HOLMES SHARRON Gtenwood, Al 
hoi los PAMEI v Cordon ai 

HOOKS USA Al 

hoopik TlR> an Enterprise, ai 

HORN DAVID; Clanton Al 

horn, RlBK ( a Brantie) ai 
Howard LAI RIE; Lowndesaboro, ai 

Howard MARK Waynesvflle, GA 

HOWARD SHANNON BrCWtOO, Ai 

howiii STEPHEN Port Si |oe, H 
HUBIR HEATHER; Sarasota, H 
Hi DSPl th, shoran Headland, al 
miiMAN CYNTHIA Montgomery, At 
HUSM V pats> Montgomery, Al 

HI niir i ai ra Lanetl ai 

HUTCHINs()\ DAWN Montgom. 
HUTCHINson MATT; Ocala. FL 
HY< HE, klMN Bessemei ai 
ILES. ILnniiir Killen, al 

IMMINC, AMI Birmingham. Al 
INGALls kllll rrOj Al 

ISHII. TORU; )apan 

ITSON l\\^ A Lakeland, FL 

i\n m\iRiV( Ik) ai 

l\l> DANN\ rro) Al 

JACKSON aims jackson AL 

iik oat mark Montgomer) ai 

IInkins SHELISIA Machiu Fl 

IINklNs VERNON; Alachua, FL 
IENNINGS ilRIM I nlon, SC 
JIPP. ELIZABETH; Orlando II 
lOHNs a AlRt Montgomer) Al 
IOHNSON ( I M Dl rheodore ai 
JOHNSON Dionni Goshen ai 
IOHNSON IAMES Panama Citv 11 

KOHNSON IANI 1 Tun AL 

IOHNSON iohn Glenwood, al 
ioiinson u in Mai etta I • 
IOHNSON klRMiT Herrin il 
IOHNSON klRRI Camilla. I 
IOHNSON KIMBERL) !•>'• Al 
IOHNSON LAWRENCI Orlando. H 

IOHnson niBi ti ner) ai 

ioiinson MK HAEI l"ro) Al 

IOHNSON MK HAEI Ml • Al 

IOHNSON STEPHANII I Al 

ioiinson si s\n Paxton H 
ioiinson URiNi i Met dian MS 

IOIINSON WIUIAV Ml 

iohnston iinuik Montgomer) Al 

IOHNsTON kKlsT \ OZOI I H 
IOHNSTON l"RACE> Vihurn AL 
ION|s ( OKI> N Al 

lONfs (KIC Tr.n Al 

ionis minr> Greem • 

ION|s JASON Tjmpa H 



Frc\hmen 87 



JONES, KIMBERELY; Abbeville, AL 

JONES, MICHAEL; Montgomery, AL 

JONES, MICHAEL; Mobile, AL 

JONES, NADINE; Troy, AL 

JONES, RAY; Troy, AL 

JORDAN, PATRICK; Montgomery, AL 

JOWERS, DONNA; Opp, AL 

KELLEY, BUBBA; Troy, AL 

KELLEY, DAWN; Ft. Mitchell, AL 

KELLEY, JAMES; Georgiana, AL 

KELLEY, REBECCA; Rutledge, AL 

KELLY, MARTHA; Eufaula, AL 

KELLY, NANCY; Dothan, AL 

KENTY, ELIZABETH; Montgomery, AL 

KERVIN, DEAN; Red Level, AL 

KHAMKEN, VON; Montgomery, AL 

KIDD, TERESA; Troy, AL 

KILLOUGH, TRACEY; Honoraville, AL 

KILPATRICK, MICHAEL; Luverne, AL 

KIMBROUGH, STEPHANIE; Troy, AL 

KINARD, MATTHEW; Lynn Haven, FL 

KINEARD, DANIA; Blakley, GA 

KIRBY, NANCY; Bowling Green, FL 

KIRKLAND, CECIL; Mulberry, FL 

KIRKLAND, TINA; Opelika, AL 

KLINZING, KARI; Spring Hill, FL 

KNIGHT, KIMBERLY; Opelika, AL 

KNIGHT, THOMAS; Sarasota, FL 

KNIGHTEN, LEIGHANN; Montgomery, AL 

KNODEL, KATHRYN; Chunchula, AL 

KONIAR, ROBERT; Foley, AL 

KOON, SANG FUNG; Troy, AL 

KUSHMAR, TAMMY; Montgomery, AL 

KUNTZ, BILL; Pineapple, AL 

KYZAR, LEE; Troy, AL 




7<£e "SOTi'HV" c*t TOcuJUttytott 



Troy State's very own 
"Sound of the South" was se- 
lected as a national represen- 
tative band in the 1989 Presi- 
dential Inaugural Parade in 
Washington D.C. One col- 
lege band from each of the 
50 states was chosen to re- 
present the nation. The se- 
lection of Troy State to be a 
national representative was a 
great honor. 

This was not the first time 
TSU had been selected for 
this prestigious event. They 
have performed for the ina- 
guration four times in the 
past, but during their last visit 
in 1983 the band was unable 
to march due to poor weath- 
er conditions. This was not 
the case this year. All 235 
proud members of the band 
marched the 1.6 mile parade 
route along 15th Street and 



Pennsylvania Avenue. The 
band was also invited to a re- 
ception honoring George 
Bush. 

The trip was both recrea- 
tional and educational. Many 
band members enjoyed visit- 
ing such historical landmarks 
as the Pentagon, the Capital 
and the Lincoln and Viet- 
nam Memorials. The stu- 
dents also visited both 
Georgetown and Williams- 
burg, Virgiania. 

TSU band member Doug- 
las Russell said, "The trip was 
absolutely fantastic. It was 
really great to be around so 
many historical sites." 

TSU Band Director, Dr. 
John M. Long commented, 
"This was a great honor for 
the university . . . it's the 
greatest compliment a band 
can receive." 




88 Freshmen 












«w^3 




I \K)K( i \u iok Bayo • ai 

LACEY, m\K: Al 

l MNSEY, CLAY; W( • H 

IALKA. |A( qiiini Ph( nix City, Al 

l amhir I BRIAN r>oy, Al 

LAMKlv WILLIAM; Pine *pp • 

l \NDERS FRAN< ES Brooksville, H 

l ANGFORD, BRYSON sh«-llmdn - 

i anu n BRENDA; Mobile Al 

largi MARY rroy M 

I arrimori RONNII l KL 

l ASI Hk |OE; \ddisoi ai 

i SSHl RE, ikidkk k rroy al 

LAVELY, IENNIFER; If... ai 

l awrim I ( VNTHIA; M 

l awrim I |A1 k Headland 

i aw son ( \ki Andalusia ai 

LEACH, stims Gadsden ai 

LEDKINs RANDALL; tonore, al 

l ED\ \Rl) HI MHER; Montgomery, Al 

in BRADLEY, Prattville, M 

LEE, Brian, alabaster, ai 

hi iwimv Elba, AL 

LEE, TANYA; New Brocton, Al 

LEONARD, LYNN; Lakeland, EL 

LEROY, SHARON; Dothai 

LESLEY, < HARI II rroj Al 

LEVERETTI KYLE; Brundidge, AL 

LEWIS, RONALD; Summerdal. 
LEVV\ unci rroy, ai 
LICON, ELLA; Moi AL 

LINDSEY, RACHAIl Inn Ai 
IINGLEY, DEAN A Brewtl I Al 
LINDSEY, DEBRA Montgomer 
LITTLE, MARCI; O/ark Al 



LITTLE, MARK, Eruillandpark, EL 
LIVINGSTON EMANUEI Pensacola, FL 
LOCk! KARI N ( enterville ai 

UK MR kini Florence ai 



IO( k!TT, THOMAS; Troy, Al 
LOCKRIDQ MK Ml \ Reno n\ 

LOGAN |IM Inlaw Al 
LOGAN pirrv Bik Pine Kej Al 



LONG Bl DDY; lallahassee n 
LONG HOLLY Phonh c Ity, Al 
LOPE/ \scii Lakeland n 
lOPRIMi KATHLEEN La Gt 



low I tnw MID Montgomery, Al 
LOWERS riMOTHY Luverne Al 

LOYED |AMES; Dothan Al 
li ( > STEVEN Fort Paw. 



li DWIG timoth> Denver, CO 
li ^k PAMB a Mmore M 
MAHAFFE\ ill fro) Al 
\u BKMM MARILYN rro) Al 



Froshmcn 89 



MCCAIN, GREGORY; Millry, AL 

MCCALL, CHRISTOPHER; Montgomery, AL 

MCCANLESS, PHILIP; Oxford, AL 

MCCARLEY, LETICIA; Mobile, AL 

MCCARLEY, WENDY; Mobile, AL 

MCCLANEY, VENESIA; Union Springs, AL 

MCCLENDON, WALTER; Eufaula, AL 

MCCLURE, JEFFREY; Troy, AL 

MCCORMICK, SHERRY; Geneva, AL 

MCCOY, CHRISSI; Ozark, AL 

MCCULLOUGH, JASON; Clanton, AL 

MCCURDY, NATALIE; Dothan, AL 

MCDANIEL, BIBI; Ozark, AL 

MCDANIEL, JOHN; Prattville, AL 

MCDANIEL, RONNIE; Selma, AL 

MCEWAN, MICHELLE; Sarasota, FL 

MCFAY, WILLIAM; Blakely, GA 

MCGEE, HEATHER; Tallassee, AL 

MCGHEE, VERONICA; Alexander City, AL 

MCGOUGH, LETHA; Montgomery, AL 

MCGOWAN, MARY; Westville, FL 

MCGUIRE, CARLISE; Brundidge, AL 

MCKINNEY, ROYCE; Ozark, AL 

MCKINNON, MICHAEL; Carrollton, GA 

MCKENZIE, GINA; Crestwiew, FL 

MCKINNEY, FLOYD; Georgiana, AL 

MCLANEY, JOHN; Louisville, AL 

MCLEAN, LISA; Montgomery, AL 

MCLEMORE, LILLIE; Montgomery, AL 

MCLENDON, CRAIG; Montgomery, AL 

MCLENDON, PAMELA; Troy, AL 

MCLEOD, JACQULYN; Troy, AL 

MCSWEAN, MALCOLM; Glenwood, AL 

MCTIER, MARY; Montgomery, AL 

MCWHORTER, RODNEY; Troy, AL 

MACLEOD, KELLY; Ozark, AL 

MADDOX, BETH; Montgomery, AL 

MANN, ASHLEY; Montgomery, AL 

MANN, JEAN; Montgomery, AL 

MANSFIELD, KATRINA; Newton, AL 

MARAMAN, MORT; Georgiana, AL 

MARRIOTT, ANNE; Phenix City, AL 

MARSH, CHADRAK; Bagdad, FL 

MARSH, ROBERT; Ariton, AL 

MARSHALL, DOY; Bonifay, FL 

MARTIN, ERIC; Gordon, AL 

MARTIN, HEATHER; Opp, AL 

MARTIN, THERESA; Luverne, AL 

MARTIN, PAUL; Tallahassee, FL 

MARVIN, JOSALYN; Andalusia, AL 

MATHEWS, ANGIE; Troy, AL 

MATT, ARTHUR; Mount Dora, FL 

MATTHEWS, NICOLE; Grady, AL 

MATTHEWS, STEPHANIE; Holiday, FL 

MAXWELL, LORI; Marietta, GA 

MAXWELL, MICHELLE; Daytona Beach, FL 

MAYE, LORRAINE; Greenville, AL 

MAYNE, DONALD; Tallahassee, FL 

MAYS, CINDY; Bessemer, AL 

MAZUR, KEVIN; Fayetteville, GA 

MEADOWS, RANDALL; Cottonwood, AL 

MEANS, MACHELL; La Pine, AL 

MEEHAN, THOMAS; Pensacola, FL 

MENDE, GENT; Finland 
MENON, GOVIND; Troy, AL 
MERCER, KELLIE; Eufaula, AL 
MEREDITH, BILL; Mobile, AL 
MERKEL, PAMELA; Troy, AL 
MESSER, GUY; Lake City, FL 
MIDDLEBROOKS, WALTER; Autaugaville, AL 




TOfflB 




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90 Freshmen 




fN£«.efl 



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-a& . JV^ , / up j \i 




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MIDDI I rON, AMANDA Ml 

MIDDI l ion DARRELL; Ml Vernon, AL 

Mill IK, am> Hi adland, M 
MILLER, no Douglas, GA 
MILLIR. MARTIN; Selma, AL 

MILIs Klin GA 

Mills IROY; Tamarac. FL 

MINER, PENELOPE; Vernon, Fl 

Ml T( Mill . \mv Mbany, GA 
MITC HELL, KATHLEEN; Troy, AL 
MlK Mill , LOGAN; Eufaula, AL 
MITC HELL, MARY; Tallassee, AL 
MITCMLLL, TIA, Cordova, AL 
MOMR, KIMMIE, Orlando, FL 

MOMOS, SHAWN; Atlanta, GA 
moori . robiri. Eufaula, AL 

MONEY, FAYE; Troy, AL 
MORGAN, DEBRA, Montevallo, Al 
MORGAN, ROBERT; Birmingham. Al 
MORGAN, WILLIAM; Montgomery, AL 
MORRIS, MELISSA; Memphis is 

MORROW, WAYNE; Smiths, AL 
MOSELEY, MICHAEL; Elba, AL 
MOSES, CLAUDIA; Montgomery, AL 
MOSS, DERRICK; Dululh, GA 
MOTES, JENNIFER; Troy, AL 
MULLIS, MELISSA; Mulberry, FL 
MUNDY, DEBORAH; Clanton, AL 

MURPHY, DENISE; Eclectic, AL 
Ml RPHV |ASEN; fnglewood, CO 
Ml RPHN Kill I; Brandord, FL 
MURPHY, MEREDITH, Trov, AL 
MURRAY, TARA; Thomasville Al 
MUSICK, KAROL; Monroeville, AL 
MYERS, JAMES; Morris. AL 

MYERS, SHERRY; Troy, AL 
NAGY, MICHAEL, Enterprise, AL 
NAPOLI, STEPHEN; Enterprise, AL 
NELSON, OLGA; Troy. AL 
NEWCOMB, MARK; Orlando, FL 
NICHOLS, GRANT; Abbeville Al 
NICHOLS, JAMES; Union Springs AL 

NICHOLS, PHILIP; Dunnellon, FL 
NICHOLS, SUSAN; Montevalle Al 
NIEKRO, JOHN Atlanta, GA 
NIX, LESTINl Greenville al 
MIX, SHANNON Eufaula Al 
NOLIN, AMY; Anton Al 
NORMAN. MARY; Ramer, Al 

NUNNELEE, TERRY; Trov 

OGBURN, STEVEN; Tro) M 

O'HARA si an Live Oak H 

OLIVER u and a Banks M 

ORBAUGH, CAMERO; Goldsmith IN 

OSLIN PAT Montgomery Al 

OSMER, RICHARD West Palm Bwili. FL 

OTT, NATHANIEL; Homestead. FL 
OWEN amanda Blakef) I 
OWENS IOHN Birmingham Al 
PADGETT K at ill R ini Pensacola FI 
PADGETT, LESLIE; Evergreen, AL 
PARK AND \ Brundidge Al 
PARKER Bim Warrioi Al 

PARKiR DIANI Elba ai 
PARKER |AMES Killen Al 

PARKMAN BRENDON Pike Road Al 
PARNlll M OTT RoSWeU 

PATTERSON BRITI Eufaula Al 

PATTERSON I AMIS Tjmpa. FL 
PI u oc k wn fequesta H 



freshmen 91 



PEACOCK, MARY; Troy, AL 

PEARSON, TERRIN; Troy, AL 

PENN, MELISSA; Troy, AL 

PENNINGTON, CHARLES; Phenix City, AL 

PENNINGTON, ERIK; Tuskeegee, AL 

PERAULT, MICHELLE; Ozark, AL 

PERDUE, VICKI; Greenville, AL 

PERRY, ANGELA; Oak Hill, WV 

PERRY, MATTHEW; Florata, AL 

PERRY, WILLIAM; Eufala, AL 

PETERSON, PATRICIA; Highland Home, AL 

PEZENT, MICHAEL; Jackson, AL 

PHILLIPS, JOHN; Atlanta, GA 

PHILLIPS, TIMOTHY; Panama City, FL 

PHILPOT, BRADLEY; Stone Mountain, GA 

PICKEL, EARL; Gallion, AL 

PIERCE, VIRGINIA; Daphne, AL 

PILCHER, TERRY; Freeport, FL 

PIPER, PHILLIP; Orange Park, FL 

PITRULLE, TONI; Fort Lauderdale, FL 

PITTS, HARVEY; Panama City, FL 

PITTS, NADINE; Pensacola, FL 

PLATO, CHERYL; Montgommery, AL 

PONTHIER, ANDREA; Bay Minnette, AL 

POOKE, ASHLEY; Troy, AL 

POPE, AMY; Reston, VA 

PORTFIELD, JEFF; Troy, AL 

POSEY, DARYL; Thorsby, AL 

POTTS, JOE; Sumiton, AL 

POUNCFEY, RHONDA; Brantley, AL 

POWELL, ANGELA; Troy, AL 

POWELL, BRENDA; Jackson, AL 

POWELL, WENDY; CORDELE, GA 

POWERS, DARLENE; Montgomery, AL 

PRICE, BECKY; Montgomery, AL 

PRICE, CAROLYN; Inverness, FL 

PRICE, DONNA; Eclectic, AL 

PRICE, KIMBERLY; Newville, AL 

PRICE, NAIMA; Montgomery, AL 

PRICE, SHAWN; Valrico, FL 

PRICE, TROY; Fairhope, AL 

PUGH, JAMES; Reform, AL 

PUGH, SABRINA; Guin, AL 

PYLE, STEPHEN; Eclectic, AL 

RADZIK, KARON; Ft Walton Beach, FL 

RAINES, RENNIE; Peterman, AL 

RAINEY, RONALD; Troy, AL 

RAMM, MICHAEL; Gulf Breeze, FL 

RAPE, NORMAN; Troy, Al 

RAYSIN, LISA; Fitzpatrick, AL 

REDMON, MICHAEL; Troy, AL 

REAVES, MARTY; Ohatchee, AL 

REED, KIMMIE; Blakely, GA 

REEVES, STEPHANIE; Lowndesboro, AL 

REEVES, SUZANNE; Jacksonville, FL 

RENFRO, JAMIE; Dothan, AL 

RENTZ, KIMBERLY; Moultrie, GA 

REYNOLDS, KATRY; Tallahassee, FL 

REYNOLDS, SCOTT; Cantonment, FL 

REYNOLDS, TODD; Defuniak Springs, FL 

RHODES, MARLA; Troy, Al 

RICHARDS, DAVID; Deatsville, AL 

RICHARDS, LEIGH; Troy, Al 

RICHARSDON, CREEL; Fort Walton, FL 

RICHARDSON, ELIZABETH; Donaldsonville, GA 

RICHARDSON, MICHAEL; Rutledge, AL 

RICHARDSON, STARLA; Newton, AL 

RICHBURG, WILLIAM; Troy, AL 

RIDOLPH, WILLIAM; Miramar, FL 

RIGGS, REBECCA; Lakeland, FL 




%$* 




,ii ■ 








92 Freshmen 











Hi *1 fl( €> ft ^ t H 




kiin soNi • al 

RILEY, mow skh rroy, AL 
RITTInhoi SI MARY; Brooksville, Fl 
ROBIK rs, RANDON; M< 
ROBINSON, I ISA; rroy, M 
ROBINSON, RECINA; Montgomery, -M 
R()( HESTER, IKK . Birmingham. M 

RODNEY, CRA< ELIA; Si Elizabeth Ian 

koi |AMES; Pine Hill, AL 

ROGERS, Ki SSELL; Milton, Fl 

ROOS CL) MOI Ml. tndalusia, AL 

ROSS. \mv Elba, AL 

Ross SHANNON; < learwatei Beat h, FL 

ro>suk 50N\ v Marion, AL 

RUDDER, TAMMOTHY; Fl Payne, M 
RUSSEI I . MANNING; M( f, AL 

RUSSELL, STEVEN; Grad>. M 
SABATTINI, ASHLEV Sarasota H 
SAGAPOULUTELE, SALAM V Laie, HI 
SANBORN. MARC . Eizabethtown k> 
SANDERS, CARRII Goshen, M 

SANDIRs DANNY; Ocala, FL 
SANDERS, DEBRA; Goshen, AL 
SANDERS, |ANI I Goshen, AL 
SANDERS, IONAS; Sylacauga. AL 
SANDERS, MELINDA; Newark, OH 
SASSER |IMMY; PensacoU, FL 
SAULS, BELLAMIE; Anion M 

SAWYER, LOVINA; Tro\. M 
SCARBROUGH, LOUIE; Troy. AL 
SCARPA, MARK; Seymour, CT 
SCHMUDE, DANIEL, Phemx ( it) M 
SCHOFIELD, SHELIA; Montgomery M 
SCHROEDER. SHANDA, Calera M 
SCOGGINS, IASON; Si Petersburg, FL 

SCOTT, BETT>, Troy, M 

SEAY, TOMMIE; Donaldsonville, GA 

SEEL, NEVILLE burg, FL 

SEERY, EDEN; Dothan, AL 

SELLERS, JOHN, Tallahassee, FL 

SENN, ( \milli, Troy M 

SENN, CHA S NING; Brundidv- 

SENN, IIWIIIR Tro) M 
SHAW. GREG; Eulaula M 
SHAW, MICHAEL; Union Springs, *L 
SHI -\n IOSEPH Georgiana, W 
SHERWOOD C I \KK. Lakeland, FL 
SHETTER, MIC HAEI lakeland, FL 
SHIELDS, REGIN \ TtO) ^L 

SHIPMAN. LIONEL, Brundidge M 
SHIVER KANDICE; Monticello, FL 
SHOI MAKI mi 01 1 Mmon 
short. WILLIAM; Fl Myers, FL 
SHOTWELI kinn c ocoa Beach, Fl 
SHADDIX, MICHAEI Fl Paynt 
SHY. JACQUELNN Tun M 

SIGMON IEFFREY; Brandon Fl 

SIKES DAVID; Cordele, GA 
SIMMONS BRENDA Fort D( 
simmons |A< QL ELYN Sdnrta, M 
simpson LISA Pensacota H 
SIMPSON w \kki n Paxton Fl 
SIMS mw \kd Scottsboro, M 

SINGI l TON RODNE\ Mot M 

SINGTON FRED Gadsdt 

sit/ Mil \nii Ozark 

SI OTON I'M i \ Shortervilks \i 

si OTTER) f kin Montgomery M 

si \i GHTER \nthon> Brundidge \L 

smith \m> Si ^ t nine ft 



freshmen 93 



SMITH, ANGELYN; Tallahassee, F 

SMITH, BERKLEIGH; Lillian, A 

SMITH, CARL; Montgomery, A 

SMTIH, EDWARD; Montgomery, A 

SMITH, KEITH; Ormond Beach, F 

SMITH, KYLE; Ormond Beach, F 

SMITH, KYLE; Clanton, A 

SMITH, LONNA; Uriah, A 

SMITH, PHILLIP; Chipley, F 

SMITH, ROBERT; Holmes Beach, F 

SMITH, RHONDA; Montgomery, A 

SMITH, RHONDA; Millbrook, A 

SMITH, SAMUEL; Panama City, F 

SMITH, SANDRA; Memphis, TN 

SMITH, STANFORD; Coral Springs, F 

SMITH, THERESA; Ashford, A 

SMITH, XANDRA; Elba, A 

SMOTHERS, BESSIE; Brundidge, A 

SMOTHERS, STEPHEN; Brundidge, A 

SNOW, SUZANNE; Lakeland, F 

SNYDER, GLENN Sarasota, F 

SNYDER, ROBIN; Goshen, A 

SPENCE, RACQUEL; Kissimmee, F 

SPIVEY, ROY; Robertsdale, A 

SPRUELL, STEPHEN; Vincent, A 

STALLWORTH, AMANDA; Brewton, A 

STANCIL, DAVID; Cumming, GA 

STANSBURY, VINCE; Winter Springs, Fl 

STARKS, KEITH; Troy, A 

STEGALL, MELANIE; Troy, A 

STEPHENS, CYNTHIA; Troy, A 

STEPHENS, JAMES; Prattville, A 

STEPHENS, JENNIFER; Auburn, A 

STEPHENS, LESLIE; Crestview, F 

STEPHENSON, SHEA; Dothan, A 

STEWART, RICHARD; Troy, A 

STEWART, TONIA; Tallassee, A 

STOKES, REBECCA; Dothan, A 

STONE, LISA; Childersburg, A 

STONE, PENNY; Monticello, GA 

STONE, TERESA; Dadeville, A 

STRAHL, DAVID; Selma, A 

STRAUGHN, CHRISTINE; Daphne, A 

STRICKLAND, JEFFREY; Louisville, A 

STRICKLAND, MICHAEL; Troy, A 

STRICKLAND, PAUL; Camden, A 

STRICKLEN, GRANT; Troy, A 

STROUSE, JEFFREY; Lakeland, F 

STUCKEY, DONNA; Greenville, A 

STUMP, DEREK; Andalusia, A 
STYRON, ERIC; Rutledge, A 
SUCANSKY, SUSAN; Mellertown, PA 

SULLIVAN, MONICA; Troy, A 
SUTHERLAND, ROBERT; Orlando, F 
SUTTER, BRADLEY; Sarasota, F 
SUTTON, SHAWN; Macon, GA 

TADLOCK, ROBERT; Ozark, A 

TALBOT, BILL; Troy, A 

TARVIN, CYNTHIA; Jacksonville, F 

TAYLOR, CAROLYN; Montgomery, A 

TAYLOR, DALISIA; Arley, A 

TAYLOR, DANIEL; Brewton, A 

TAYLOR, DEDIE; Brundidge, A 

TAYLOR, HAROLD; Louisville, A 

TAYLOR, JANET; Montgomery, A 

TAYLOR, JENNIFER; Indian Harbour, F 

TAYLOR, LARRY; Troy, A 

TAYLOR, MARCUS; Kissimmee, Fl 

TEMLIN, ROBERT; Albany, GA 

TERRELL, KENNETH; Dothan, AL 




94 Freshmen 



nn fmA "i£. 








Sfl ^ fl ™s 




WEATHERFORD 



TAYLOR. WENDELL; Brundidgc al 

THOMAS k arin Wei J" pi 
IIIOMAS, STEPHE N : Fl 

ihomason. jinniiik, Montgoi 
rHOMPKINS, DEBBIE; IVo) M 

IIIIIRY, MICHAEL, Troy Al 
TOMPKINS, ELIZAB! IH Han <■< . AL 

THOMPSON, STACY, Summerdale, AL 

Thompson. rONYA; lamesboro, GA 

IMORNION AM, II A, Dothan, AL 
THORPE, ANTHONY; Dothan, Al 
THREATT, DYPHHIA, Sclriu Al 
TIBIIIR. EMILE; Gulf Shores. Al 
TICE, KENDRA; Jacksonville, EL 

TIDWELL, RONDA; Eufaula, AL 
TILLERY, MELISSA, Troy, AL 
III I MAN, LORI; l.inhope, AL 
TISDALE, CYNTHIA; Andalusia, AL 
TOLBERT, SHONDA; Brewton, Al 
TONEY, DARYL; Columbus, GA 
TORTORICE, CHAD; Albany, GA 

TOWNSEND, ADAM; Lynn Haven H 
TRIMBLE, MATTHEW; Ozark, AL 
TRIPP!, SHANNON; Lapine. AL 
TUCKER, ALVIN; Goshen, AL 
TUDOR, CLAUDE; Merritt Island. EL 
TURK, DAVID; Panama City, FL 
TURNER, TIM; Montgomery, AL 

TL RNIR. PAUL; Dothan, AL 
TUTCHTONE, SHARON, Greenville, AL 
TYLER, JANIS; Montgomery, Al 
UGOCHUKWU, GOODLL CK Montgomery, 
UHRIG, RUSSELL; Enterprise, AL 
VANCE, MICHAEL; Troy, AL 
VANLANDINGHAM, MARK; Cairo, GA 

\ ANN, HOLLY; Smiths, AL 
VANN, LESLIE; Smiths, AL 
VAUGHAN AM> Troy, AL 
VEACH, RHONDA, Montgomery Al 
VICKERV TIMOTHY, Georgiana, AL 
VISCO, LISA; Clearwater, FL 
VOGEL, DONAKD; Duluth, GA 

VOIGT, BONNIE; Osprey, FL 

WAGNER, KlMBERLN, East Providence, Ri 

WAGONER, BRIAN; Huntswlle, AL 

WAITES, Christopher, Fayetteville, GA 

WALDROP, DEVI; Florala, AL 
WALL, BRIAN; O/ark AL 
WALL, MICHAEL Cuthbert, GA 

w mi M i i ance lake Wales Fl 
W AlkER DAWN; Clio, AL 
WALKER ( AROL. Samson, Al 
W ALKER, IODIE; Enterprise Al 
W MkIR KRlsTI Tro\. Al 
W AlkER TOBN leroy Al 

v\ Aiif R mmberly. Brewton Al 

w ARD, CARVIS; Peachl CA 

WARD, |AMES Fl Walton Beach, FL 

WARD |OAN. Montgomery Al 
W ARD SHAWN TrOJ Al 
W ARRIN C IND\ Troy; AL 
WARRICK IE FEE RN Tros Al 
WATERS DANA Montgome- 

w MkiNs mrrv Madisonville, k> 

W ATson (AMES Headlano 

w VTSON (AMES Montgomer) ^L 

W VTSON |OHN I nk AL 

w \Tso\ MELISSA Port St |oe Fl 

W ATT IKs DANA Sdmi Al 

Wl ATHIREORD BRADIE> L nah. AL 



Freshman 95 



WEATHERMAN, ELIZABETH; Montgomery, AL 

WEATHERMAN, NANCI; Montgomery, AL 

WILLIAMSON, MARCELLA; Montgomery, AL 

WEAVER, KELLIE; Clayton, AL 

WEBSTER, CHRISTOPHER; Ft Walton Beach, FL 

WEFING, HATCH; Apapachicola, FL 

WEHNER, ROGER; St Cloud, FL 

WEITH, JOHN; Albany, GA 

WELLS, FAYE; Eufaula, AL 

WELLS, JENNIFER; Troy, AL 

WERTZ, KRISTIN; Marlitta, GA 

WESPISER, KATHERINERA; Venice, FL 

WESTON, MICHELLE; Longwood, FL 

WHIDDON, PAMELA; Honoraville, AL 

WHITE, AMANDA; Fairhope, AL 

WHITE, MONICA; Pensacola, FL 

WHITE, ROBIN; Eufaula, AL 

WHITE, THOMAS; Troy, AL 

WHITEHEAD, BENNY; Eufaula, AL 

WHITEHEAD, JAMES; Troy, AL 

WHITEHEAD, LESLIE; Eufaula, AL 

WICKERSHEIM, MICHAEL; Ft Meade, FL 

WIGGINS, RONALD; Sparks, GA 

WIGGINS, SAMMY; Eufaula, AL 

WILBORN, BEVERLY; Eufaula, AL 

WILD, STEPHEN; Vero Beach, FL 

WILKERSON, ROBERT; Tampa, FL 

WILLIAMS, CATHY; Eufaula, AL 

WILLIAMS, CHRISTY; Dothan, AL 

WILLIAMS, DARLENE; Troy, AL 

WILLIAMS, JEFFREY; Enterprise, AL 

WILLIAMS, EVERN; Montgomery, AL 

WILLIAMS, MARK; Rentoul, KS 

WILLIAMS, MYRON; Elba, AL 

WILLIAMS, SHARON; Georgetown, GA 

WILLIAMS, VERNON; Vienna, GA 

WILLIAMSON, AL; Jack, AL 

WILLIAMSON, MELISSA; Mobile, AL 

WILLIAMSON, ROBIN; Montgomery, AL 

WILLIAMSON, ROSS; Pensacola, FL 

WILLIS, BARRY; Tallassee, AL 

WILKINSON, SHIRLEY; Crestview, FL 

WILMOTH, BRYAN; Brooks, GA 

WILSON, JOSEPH; Perry, FL 

WILSON, LARRY; Elba, AL 

WILSON, RALPH; Tuscumbia, AL 

WILSON, SELENA; Florence, AL 

WILSON, SHARON; Goshen, AL 

WILSON, WENDY; Fairhope, AL 

WILLOUGHBY, PAUL; Ariton, AL 
WINDHAM, BEVERLY; Troy, AL 
WINGARD, JANET; Goshen, AL 
WINGARD, SHARON; Troy, AL 
WISCHMANN, ERIC; Burke, VA 
WOOD, DARREN; Pensacola, FL 
WOOD, MONIQUE; Georgiana, AL 

WOOD, TATIA; Titus, AL 

WOODALL, JAMES; Tallassee, AL 

WOODCOCK, JEFFREY; Fayetteville, GA 

WOODS, RODNEY; Mobile, AL 

WOODS, ROBERT; Auburn, AL 

WORD, LEIGH; Troy, AL 

WORTHINGTON, JENNIFER; Luverne, AL 

WORTHY, GREGORY; Alexander, AL 

WRIGHT, BRUCE; Troy, AL 

WRIGHT, ELIZABETH; Sarasota, FL 

WRIGHT, JENNIFER; Dadeville, AL 

WRIGHT, TODD; Orlando, FL 

WRIGHT, WADE; Auburn, AL 

WYNN, CAROLYN; Farihope, AL 




96 Freshmen 



T\ ft fl>i « 




H)( \(, BOBBY; Greenville, AL 
VOI NG, GWENDOLYN ' 
youm.. rERESAj Greenville, AL 
YOUNG, rONY; Weaver, AL 

/isok ]on\. tuburn, \i 
ZIEGLER, mk mil. ripton, is 
ZWAYIK. kobiki ( ape I oral, FL 




%C<pA,-£Cyc*iy *P%Ofi44<U 



October 29, 1988, Troy 
State's Homecoming, is a 
day Mary Carol Moss will 
never forget. Her boy- 
friend and now finance, 
Gerarad Holzmann 

showed his love at a new 
height - literally. He want- 
ed his mariage proposal to 



be different and very spe- 
cial, something both of 
them would never forget. 
Gerard Holzmann, a 
1984 graduate of Troy 
State, hired a pilot to fly an 
airplane above Memorial 
Stadium trailing a banner 
that read "Mary Carol, will 



you marry me? Love Ge- 
rard." The proposal 
caused excitement in the 
crowd. For a moment ev- 
eryone in the crowd for- 
got about the football 
game being played. 

"I had to repeat the pro- 
posal three times before 



Mary Carol ever heard me 
because of the noice of 
the crowd, " Holzmann 
said. 

The wedding is sched- 
uled for Jul\ 1. 1989, in 
Melbourne, Florida. 



Frrshmen 97 



SOPHOMORES 




ABERCROMBIE, WILLIAM; Troy, AL 

ADAMS, PATRICIA; Brundidge, AL 

ADAMS, ROBERT; Venice, FL 

ADVANI, CAUTAM; Troy, AL 

ALEXANDER, BARRY; Valparaiso, FL 

ALEXANDER, FELICIA; Montgomery, AL 
ALEXANDER, JEFFREY; Tipton, CA 

ALLEN, BRIDGETT; Opp, AL 

ALLEN, JEFFREY; Brundidge, AL 

ALLEN, KATRINA; Montgomery, AL 

ALLISON, EDWARDS; Troy, AL 

ALLRED, NATOSHA; Andalusia, AL 

ANUSZEWSKI, ALIS; Prattville, AL 

ARD, PAMELA; Webb, AL 

ARD, STACEY; Dothan, AL 

ARD, TRACEY; Dothan, AL 

ARMSTRONG, SHAYNE; Greenville, AL 

ASKEW, ELIZABETH; Dothan, AL 

ATES, AMANDA; Andalusia, AL 

ATKINS, ALISON; Clio, AL 

ATKINS, SYLYVESTER; Greenville, AL 

ATKINSON, JENNIFER; Greeley, CO 

AUSBORN, JEFFREY; Gadsden, AL 

BAAS, TROY; Mobile, AL 

BABB, MALCOLM; Daphne, AL 

BACKENSTO, PARTICIA; Orlando, FL 

BAILY, JENNIFER; Pensacola, FL 

BAILEY, PATRICK; Atlanta, GA 

BALLARD, WENDY; Luverne, AL 

BAKER, BEVERLY; Birmingham, AL 

BAKER, MATALIE; Montgomery, AL 

BAKER, RUSSELL; Brundidge, AL 

BALLARD, RAY; Tuskegee, AL 

BANKS, WILLIE; Dothan, AL 

BANKSTON, LESLIE; Niceville, FL 

BARKETT, MARY; Ozark, AL 

BARNES, MATTHEW; Dothan, AL 

BARNES, RANDALL; Bonifay, AL 

BARNES, ROBERY; Troy, AL 

BARNES, TIM; Troy, AL 

BARRON, GWENDOLYN; Pace, FL 

BASS, VALARIE; Lockhart, AL 

BATIE, FATIMA; Troy, AL 

BAXTER, DEANNA; Louisville, AL 

BAYLES, PAMELA; Union Springs, AL 

BEARD, LEANNE; Brundidge, AL 

BECKMAN, TONI; Grand Bay, AL 

BEERMAN, MICHELLE; Pensacola, FL 

BELL, ROBBIE; Montgomery, AL 

BENNETT, ERICK; Miami, FL 

BERRY, CHARLES; Troy, AL 

BENNETT, LARTON; Selma, Al 

BENNETT, WILLIAM; Hiancity, Fl 

BLACK, GREGORY; Florence, AL 

BLAKELEY, ANGELA; Panama City, FL 

BLASCHKA, ASTRID; Troy, AL 

BLAZEK, TODD; Monroeville, AL 

BLOCKER, LORIE; Sylacauga, AL 

BOATNER, TRACY; Elberta, AL 

BOLER, MURRAY; Pine Hill, AL 

BONNER, FREDRICK; Atmore, AL 

BOOKER, REBECCA; Troy, AL 

BORNTRAGER, CINDY; Montgomery, AL 





22-tffl 




L * * \ 




98 Sophomores 







BOTTS. iikki. l"roy, Al 
BOl < HI i noiiii. Vincent, al 
BOWEN BOBBII Wintei Haven FL 
BOWIV WENDY; Portal, CA 
BOVVENS, WONNE; l j • 
BOWERS, DANIEI Doziei Al 
BOWMAN JfKK>. Birmingham, Al 

BOYD, IEFFERY; Newton, AL 

BOYKls. mk Ej Loxley, AL 
BOZEMAN. Hi MSI. rroy, AL 

BRANan PENNY; Valdosta GA 

BRANTLEY, VIVIAN; Selma. Al 
BREWER, CHERYL; Birmingham, Al 
BROCK, JOHN; Evergreen, AL 

BROUN, ANUl a |ay, FL 
BROWN, JEFFREY; Ramer, AL 
BROWN, JIMMY; Live Oak, FL 

BROWN, VEETA; Montgomery ai 
BROXSON, JERRV Milton, FL 
BRUNS, HENRY; Eustis, FL 
BRl NSON, JAMES; Baker, FL 

BRYAN1 MARENDA; ; Dozier, AL 
BL OL, BONNIE; Auburndale, FL 
BLRCH, NICOLE; Tampa, FL 
BUTLER, KIPP; Tallassee, AL 
BYNUM, DAM V lufaula, AL 
BYRD, ADAM; Auburn, AL 
BYRD, ALPONSA; Troy, AL 

BYRD, DONNA; Troy, AL 
BURKE, SISSY; Port St. Joe, FL 
BLRNETT, SYLVIA; Monroeville, Al 
BLRTON, GINGER; Montgomery AL 
Hi mi. |l LENE; Opelika, AL 
CADY, MARK; Geneva, AL 
CALDWELL, BONITA; Tallassee, AL 

CALLANS ANCH A Newville Al 
CAMPBELL WINSTON, Brundidge, AL 
CANNON, JEFFERY; Andalusia. AL 
CANTY, DONNELLA; Trov, AL 
CAPPS, AMANDA, Dothan, AL 
CARLISLE, CARLA, Dadeville. AL 
CARPER, LAURA; Niceville FL 

CARROLL, DAVID; Dothan 
CARTER. MARTIN, Albany GA 
CASEY, STEVEN; Montgomery Al 
CASON RICKN Cairo GA 
CASSELLS, TAMMY; Enterprte 
CASTILLO, THOMAS Pensacola, FL 
CASTLE, CHARLES; Bushnell, FL 

CASTLEBERRV TERRV Andalusia Al 
CATE tamara Mtamonte Sprgs, FL 

< AUR PAMEI V Anniston. Al 

CER\ERA, RICK Tu>\ Al 

( HAPMAN JOHN; Brewton Al 

( HAPMAN I AMAR; Brundidge Al 

CHESNUTT, BETs> Montgomery M 

CHESTEEN, LARRV Dunnellon Fl 

CHITWOOD rand mi Montgomery Al 
CHOQLETTf MICHELLI Montgomery ai 
CHI nn MARY; I nan Al 

C 1 \RK AMI Louisville Al 
l I VKK I HRIST) Tun Al 
CLARK DAMD fehford Al 



Sophomon 



CLARK, THOMAS; Wetumpka, AL 

CLAY, BENJAMIN; Georgiana, AL 

CLAY, TRACY; Titusville, FL 

CLECKLER, DANI; Childersburg, AL 

CLECHORN, JAY; Arley, AL 



CLOUD, MICHAEL; Troy, AL 

COGGINS, SARA; Luverne, AL 

COKER, GEORGE; Monroeville, AL 

COLE, CARLA; Eufaula, AL 

COLEMAN, CHARLES; Brewton, AL 



CONNER, JAMES; Hawkinsville, GA 

COOK, JAMES; Brewton, AL 

COOK, LAURIE; Union Springs, AL 

COOPER, VIVIAN; Montgomery, AL 

COSBY, CHRIS; Rutledge, AL 



COTTON, JEFFREY; Chamblee, GA 

COVINGTON, ARCHIE; Uriah, AL 

CRAWFORD, JAMES; Jacksonville, FL 

CRAWFORD, MARGARET; Montgomery, AL 

CRAWFORD, MARTHA; Elba, AL 

CRAWFORD, STAGE; Dothan, AL 

CROOK, STEVEN; Gadsden, AL 

CROZIER, TERESA; Fort Gaines, GA 

CRUMBLY, CHRIS; Eufaula, AL 

CRUMPTON, CHARLES; Crestview, FL 

CUMMINS, ASHLEY; Eightmile, AL 

CURENTON, DAVID; Daphne, AL 

CURRY, CHRISTOPHER; Panama City, FL 

CURTIS, LAURA; Huntsville, AL 

CURTIS, RANDALL; Troy, AL 

CUTLER, ALAN; Dothan, AL 

DADE, THOMAS; Lafayette, LA 

DAHL, MIKE; Spring Hill, FL 

DANIEL, MATT; Satellite Beach, FL 

DANIELS, BILLY; Abbeville, AL 

DANIELS, DONNA; Glenwood, AL 

DANIELS, MICHELLE; Dothan, AL 

DANSBY, JASON; Troy, AL 

DAUGHERTY, JANET; Mobile, AL 

DAVIS, BENJAMIN; Goshen, AL 

DAVIS, MELANIE; Newton, AL 

DAVIS, STEPHEN; Wauchula, FL 

DAVISON, GWENDOLYN; Fort Deposit, AL 

DAWSON, KNOWLAN; Troy, AL 

DAY, CRAIG; Fairhope, AL 

DEAN, KEVIN; Alexander City, AL 

DEAN, ROBERT; Hope Hull, AL 

DEARMON, TERRI; Montgomery, AL 

DEBROSSE, THOMAS; Sarasota, FL 

DEFALCO, CAPRICE; Nokomis, FL 

DEMPSEY, MARK; Florence, AL 

DENDY, THOMAS; Jacksons Gap, AL 

DENNIS, JAMES; Troy, AL 

DENNY, BRYAN; Milton, FL 

DESHIELDS, CHARLES; Greenville, AL 

DEVER, EMILY; Troy, AL 

DEWBERRY, NEREIDA; Atmore, AL 

DIXON, CATHY; Troy, AL 

DONALDSON, ROBERT; Opp, AL 

DOTY, STEVEN; Troy, Al 




100 Sophomores 




s4 *7<X4te *£ (2&i*ui 



Tsing Chen, <m cx( hange 

student from Hong Kong, 
China, is a very competitive 
lady who came to America to 
get a better education which 
would put her ahead of the 
rest and allow her to make 
more money. Business man- 
agement, her major, is a very 
popular and competitive 
field in China, and she wants 
to learn all she can. Even 
though expenses are high, 
Tsing believes America is the 
best place to study. "The 
openness and friendliness 
that America students share 
is a major differece from Chi- 
nese students, " she said. 
Observing American stu- 
dents, she noted that they are 



not afraid to speak out about 
theii feeloings or to talk 
about themselves. 

A new ex per irn< e for 
Tsing was American food. 
She still likes r»< e, but she 
also enjoys peanuts , "the 
nuts in the ground." Tsing 
added that she really hates 
mashed potatoes and cannot 
quite seem to eat them 

Even though she misses 
her friends and family in 
Hong Kong, she loves the 
Alabama "country" - trees, 
plants and grass. "I feel that I 
am in the best place to study, 
and I love the friends I have 
made here in Troy," Chen 
said. 



T!£fR 




DOWl, ANGIE; Montgomery , AL 
[)()\\\s DONALD; Ozark, AL 
DOZIER, MICHELLE; Trov M 
DRIGGERS, DOw-v Montgomery 
DUBBERLEY, ERA\K; Auburn. W 
DUBOSE, CHRISTOPHER; Brundidge, AL 
DUKES, DEANA, Dothan, M 

DUNN, COSSOSDRV Uriah, M 
MICHAEL, DL WW \\T. Elba, AL 
DYBALA, THOMAS; Enterprise \l 
DYKES, JEWIMR. Troy M 
)YKES, kimbiriv Sylacauga M 

ADY, RENEE; Ozark \l 
DELBERG. |L 1 1 \NM Monticeilo, GA 
GGLESTON, TERRELL; Florence M 
ISHEN, IMAN< V; Dothan. AL 
LDER, KENNI TH Lithonu 
LKINS MAR\ Ml Vernon, OH 
LLENBl RG, LORI; Bellvsood M 
LLIS, CECIL; Atmore VI 
ins mi Mmore M 

wis LISA Opp -M 
\ well isi v BERNARDINO Mian 
V \\s SHARON Montgomery M 
mrs DIXII Georgians M 
MKENBERR> 5TEPHANII i"roy M 
AIRCLOTH. IULIE; Grady M 
MTH M.EXIS 51 Stephens m 

M LKNER kiM Goshen \i 
M I KNER rONI Wetumpka \l 
\\ \RULO i M RA Pembroke r<n<-^ Fl 
ERNANDEZ ROBYN Miami Fl 
IELDER \m> Moi • M 

INN Ml< mm I Satellite Beach Fl 
ITZPATRICK (AMES Bonrfay H 



Sophomore. 101 



FLOWERS, DEBRA; Ocala, FL 

FLOWERS, LISA; Florala, AL 

FLOYD, CHARLES; Merritt Island, FL 

FLOYD, HOLLY; Merritt Island, FL 

FOLCER, CHADWICK; Headland, AL 

FORD, KRISTY; Montgomery, AL 

FRAZIER, WENDALL; Montgomery, AL 

FREDERICK, ELIZABETH; Americus, GA 

FROST, BOBBIE; Greenville, AL 

FULLER, JOHN; Enterprise, AL 

FUNK, HOLLY; Montgomery, AL 

GAMBINO, MATTHEW; Okeechobee, FL 

GAMBRELL, CLYDE; Perote, AL 

GAINES, KENT; Troy, AL 

GARRETT, BRONDA; Brundidge, AL 

GARTMON, ROBIN; Eightmile, AL 

GAYLARD, MICHAEL; Montgomery, AL 

GEMME, CHRISTOPHER; Fairport, NY 

GEORGE, ROBERT; Midland, AL 

GIBSON, ANGELA; Selma, AL 

GIBSON, NANCEY; Jemison, AL 

GIBSON, SANDRA; Greenville, AL 

GILLESPIE, VIVIAN; Montgomery, AL 

GILLILAND, BRIAN; B II n sleob, AL 

GILLILAND, TRACI; Prattville, AL 

GINGRAS, PETER; Bedford, TX 

GIORDANO, JOHN; Holiday, FL 

GODWIN, STEPHANIE; Huxford, AL 

GOOD, PUDONA; Montgomery, AL 

GOODWIN, CHARLES; Fort Deposit, AL 

GOODWIN, PAMELA; Grand Ridge, FL 

GRACE, JASON; Troy, AL 

GRACIE, KENNETH; Demopolis, AL 

GRANTHAM, ANGELIA; Eufaula, AL 

GRANTHAM, RITA; Newton, AL 

GRAVES, CYNTHIA; Troy, AL 

GRAVES, DONNA; Opp, Al 

GRAVES, JANICE; New Brockton, AL 

GRAY, MARINA; Thomasville, AL 

GREENE, DAFNI; Florala, AL 

GREEN, KIMBERLY; Union Springs, AL 

GRIGGS, BENJAMIN; Notasulga, AL 

GRIGGS, CHARLES; Ozark, AL 

GROOME, JOHNNIE; Montgomery, AL 

GROSS, TRACEY; St. Petersburg, FL 

GUNTER, TRONYA; Perry, FL 

GUTHRIE, BRIAN; Panama City, FL 

GWIN, DEAN; Monroeville, AL 

HAGAN, TERRA; Milton, FL 

HAGIN, GREGORY; Clearwater, FL 

HAKLIN, DEBORAH; Douglas, GA 

HALL, ALBERTA; Selma, AL 

HALL, JEFFREY; Brewton, AL 

HALL, VERONICA; Troy, AL 

HAMILTON, KAREN; Montgomery, AL 

HAMMOND, SUSANNE; Dothan, AL 

HAMPTON, PATRICK; Troy, Al 

HANSON, KATHRYN; Dothan, AL 

HARDEN, DALE; Banks, AL 

HARRIS, EDDIE; Dothan, AL 

HARRIS, LORRIE; Dadeville, AL 

HARPER, BRIAN; Sarasota, FL 

HART, JILL; Troy, AL 

HART, ONDREA; Dothan, AL 

HARTLEY, BENNY; Dadeville, AL 

HARTZOG, SABRINA; Dothan, AL 

HASLEY, MONICA; Georgiana, AL 

HATFIELD, MIKE; Banks, AL 

HATHCOCK, EVELYN; Montgomery, AL 

HATTAWAY, DEANNA; Troy, AL 













102 Freshmen 




HAI PI dar>i Sarasota, n 
HAUPl. DlRlk. Sarasota, Fl 

HAVAK. s( HIKII I II 

misiK. s( 01 1 Vero Be* h Fl 
nil MS, M an Brundidge, M 
mi MBY< ions. Keeslei KFB 
HENDLEY, DONALD am,.-. • 

HERBERT, mi< HAEI Brewton, Al 
HERRING, DEBRA i nlon Springs, Al 
HERRING, PAICI . Montgi 
HERRMANN, IONATHAN AL 

HIGGS, wdkkv Lawn ■ • GA 
Mill, kimbiri v Harpersvllle ai 
mil . iikki. Montgon ery, AL 

MILLER, WENDY; luuisville, AL 
mix. in . Mbertville, M 
HOFFMAN rHERESA; Dothan, AL 
HOL1 and anui Dothan, ai 
MOLIIK Jl ANITT, Auburn. AL 
MOLLIV. JOHN. Ilbd, AL 
HOLLl V RANDALL; Sprague. AL 

HOLLI1 rONY; Panama City, FL 
MOLLINS, SHERRELL; Montgomery, AL 
HOLI is. DAVID; Brundidge. AL 
HOLMAN DOROTHY; Montgomery, Al 
HOLM AN TIM; Troy, AL 
HOLMES, GALE; Estmen, GA 
HONEYCl TT. PRISCIU A. Birmingham. Al 

HORSLEY, JERWANDA; Abbeville, AL 
HORTOV |OHN; Satellite Beach, FL 
HOWARD, JAMES; Pensacola Fl 
HOWARD. JASON Newton, ai 

HOWELL, CHRISTOPHER; Enterprise Al 
HOWELL, DAWN; BIjc kshear, GA 
HUDSON, DAVID; Marietta, GA 

HUFF, STEPHANIE; Camden, AL 
HUGHES, CANDACE; Edectk Al 
HUGHES, LEE; Ozark Al 
HUGHES, SUSETTE; Ft. Payne, Al 
HUGHES, TAMMY, Glenwood. AL 
HUGHES, TRACY; Ozark Al 
HUNT, AMY; Talahassee. FL 

HUTCHINS, REGINALD. BlakeK, GA 
HUTCHINSON M DRH Dothan Al 
INGRAM \\ AND V t>0) Al 
IRBY. REBECCA; Dothan Al 
ISABEL! mmbiriv Marbur) Al 
JACKSON, EMMA; Montgomerv Al 
JACOBS |OMN; Elba, AL 

JIMll, GAIL; Montgomery Al 
JENNINGS NANCY; Enterprise Al 
JINRIGHT, BETsV Tun Al 
JOHNSON KM\ Donabonville GA 
JOHNSON \ND>;Port tagetes \\ A 

Johnson ann Mex < it> al 

JOHNSON, CAROLYN; Goshen AL 

JOHNSON ( YNTHIA; Lakeland Fl 
IOHnson DAVID Newton ai 
Johnson DAVID Eufaula ai 
JOHNSON RACHEL; Trov Al 

IOHnson R|< k> Prichard al 

ionis \ni\i rroj ai 

(ONES ( ARIN. Dothan AL 

lONls ( HESTER. Chicago. IL 
lONls MI/ABJ TM rroj Al 

IONES ROi and Branrie) al 

lONls KOI WHO llki Al 
JOSLIN ME< Mllll Troy, Al 

IORDAN ( IMMII Trov Al 

KAlls Ml AMUR Dothan 



Sophmores 103 



KELLEY, STANTON; Florala, AL 

KETCHUM, MITZI; Clayton, AL 

KILLINCSWORTH, KEVIN; Jack, AL 

KING, CRYSTAL; Mobile, AL 

KING, JAMIE; Eufaula, AL 

KIRKLAND, PAMELA; Dothan, AL 

KISTNER, BRENT; Montgomery, AL 

KNIGHT, BURLYNDA; Camp Hill, AL 

KOCH, BRADLEY; Coral Springs, FL 

KOULOUKAS, MICHAEL; Miami, FL 

KRIST, MICHELLE; Dothan, AL 

KUPFERBERG, THERESA; Montgomery, AL 

LAGER, SEAN; Tallahassee, FL 

LAMB, PATRICK; Frostproof, FL 

LAMB, TRACEY; Winfield, AL 

LAMBERTH, JANA; Tallassee, AL 

LAMPLEY, CLARISSA; Brundidge, AL 

LANDRUM, SLATER; Wetumpka, AL 

LANE, DAWN; Montgomery, AL 

LANGDON, MELISSA; Birmingham, AL 

LANGFORD, CARL; Daleville, AL 

LAPP, STACEY; Ozark, AL 

LAWAL, LOLA; Troy, AL 

LAWERENCE, JAMES; Brundidge, AL 

LAWSON, TREMELA; McKenzie, AL 

LEAVINS, JENNIFER; Spanish Fort, AL 

LEE, GEORGE; St. Petersburg, FL 

LEE, JACK; JACK, AL 

LEE, ROSIE; Troy, AL 

LEGG, SHANNON; Knoxsville, TN 

LEHMAN, LAURA; Eufaula, AL 

LEMARI, EVANGELINE; Phenix City, AL 

LEONARD, DONAVAN; Middleburg, AL 

LETSON, LORI; Geneva, AL 

LEWELLEN, PAUL; Selma, AL 

LEWIS, JOSEPH; Geneva, AL 

LEWIS, PENNY; Pelahatchie, MS 

LEWIS, SHANE; Pensacola, FL 

LIVINGSTON, KERRY; Troy, Al 

LIVINGSTON, PINKEY; Jacksonville, FL 

LOTT, LORI; Mobile, AL 

LOTT, TONYA; Citronelle, AL 

LOVELACE, TAMMY; Brewton, AL 

LOVVORN, CAROL; Birmingham, AL 

LUCAS, WESLEY; Prattville, AL 

LYNN, TAMMY; Troy, AL 

MADDOX, DAWN; Andalusia, AL 

MADISON, BATHONIA; Montgomery, AL 

MAHADY, MIKE; Brielle, NJ 

MAHAFFEY, ELIZABETH; Troy, AL 

MAJOR, MARSHALL; Ft. Meyers, FL 

MAJORS, JOY; Troy, AL 

MANNING, MARCUS; Monroeville, AL 

MANNING, THOMAS; Jay, AL 

MARSHALL, JAMES; Brandon, FL 

MARSHALL, MICHAEL; Lakeland, FL 

MARSHALL, STERLING; Montgomery, AL 

MARTIN, JENNIFER; Talladega, AL 

MATTHEWS, TAMARA; Phenix, AL 

MARTIN, KIMBERLY; Troy, AL 

MARTIN, SONIA; Dothan, AL 

MARTY, ANGELA; Opp, AL 

MASON, JOSH; Brantley, AL 

MATTHEWS, HOLLY; Holiday, FL 

MAUK, FRED; Sarasota, FL 

MAY, SHARON; Union Springs, AL 

MAYS, CARLOS; Tuskegee, AL 

MAXWELL, FRANK; Lakeland, FL 

MCCLAIN, JIMMY; Troy, AL 

MCCARTHY, VICKI; Rutledge, AL 










Tl£ - 



f 



* o ft A - mi 




104 Sophomores 




Ml ( I MN ( HANDR * I ■ H 

MCCLELI KN, ' MIA !'<••■ 

\u ( OOI ,ERI( 'I 

\K ( k\ki ( MtSON; < jthbert, GA 

M< ( RARY, |OI Ml.ii.ij, GA 

Ml ( K-\\\. mk HAEL; I'- M 

Ml DANIEI . HI miiir Fairhopi M 

Ml DANIEL, MICHAH. RobertsdaJe, M 
Ml DOVVELL, BRAD • M 

\u DOWELI kohiki Frostproof Fl 
Ml GEI , DONALD; ' enterville, M 

m< GINTY, m-\kk, Brantley, m 
MCKH, M\IN. Mljnta, GA 
MCKlNNiv rERESA; Anderson, SC 




7^e Ti/osiid (2<wie& fo *7*<Mt 



Many students live and 
grow in a world whose 
boundaries seldom extend 
beyond the Southeastern 
United States. Others, how- 
ever, have the great fortune 
to travel and experience the 
world with their own senses 
and are not resigned to sit 
and see the world on MTV or 
some other television net- 
work. 

Ian Hunt is one such stu- 
dent whose priveledge in life 
has been to fit into the "oth- 
er" category. As the son of 
the American Defense and 
Army Attache stationed in 
the American Embassy in 
New Delhi, India. Living in 
India since his father's appoi- 
tent in 1986, Ian spends three 



to four months of each war 
in India. 

"Living in India has 
amounted to an incredible 
opportunity to learn and 
grow in a foreign culture," 
Hunt said. 

The Himalayan mountain 
range, the "mother" Ganges 
River and historical monu- 
ments like the Taj Mahal and 
the Holy Cows have all be- 
come common-place to Ian. 
Through all of his exper- 
iences, he has learned that 
this is a fascinating world and 
ea< h of us should make e\ er\ 
effort to learn what other 
people, those people be- 
yond our horizons, think and 
know and do. 




MCLAIN, ROCIR TrO) M 

MCLAUGHlls 50NYA taington M 
\u LENDON DONNA l>o> M 

SKI I NOON IVMMi froy M 
MCLEOD. BRIAN TrO) M 

\k iin ui\i» FaJrhope M 

MCNABB MJDRA Fl \\.)im%rik:hl VK 
MCQUAGGE. I Mil. Tun M 

\K V \i MARK Brewton M 
\u \\ mi K^ Mil HAEI Enterpi se M 
miredith, ion froy M. 
mirriii \m anda Florala Al 
MEYER 51 5AN Panama Cit) Fl 
MIKKELSEN PAMEI A Fotej M 

MILBR\- CANDACI Dayton, OH 

Mills FRANK Marietta 

MIIIIIH.I CYNTHIA Montgomery Al 

MILLER ( HRISTOPHEH A Haven, Fl 

Mill IR II IZABI in. Prartvilh 

MILLER IliiRn Hawkinswille I 

Mil 1 1 R iohn n, .-. Port Riche) Fl 



Sophomore^ 105 



MILSTID, WANDA; Montgomery, A 

MILTON, WANDA; Troy, A 

MIMS, ANGELY; Evergreen, A 

MING, DANIEL; Brundidge, A 

MINGUS, MATTHEW; Enterprise, A 

MITCHELL, JOYCE; Montgomery, A 

MITHIKA, CAROLINE; Troy, A 

MIZELL, TRACI; Newton, A 

MONEY, JOHNNIE; Troy, A 

MONEY, REBECCA; Troy, A 

MONROE, VALERIE; Brewton, A 

MONTGOMERY, RICHARD; Boca Grande, F 

MOORE, CARLOS; Tuscaloosa, A 

MOORE, GORDON; Altamonte Spring, F 

MOORE, SHIRLEY; Roosevelt City, A 

MOORE, TONI; Okeechobee, F 

MORAN, LISA; Troy, A 

MORIN, STEPHANIE; Troy, A 

MORRISON, SCOTT; Lapine, A 

MORROW, ANISSA; Elba, A 

MOULTRIE, MICHELLE; Fitzgerald, GA 

MOULDS, CAROLYN; Montgomery, A 

MUNDY, CAROL; Mobile, A 

MURDIX, JOHN; Phenix City, A 

MURPH, JAMES; Brewton, A 

MUSSLER, EDWARD; Troy, A 

NAFTEL, KELLY; Auburn, A 

NELSON, KATHY; Montgomery, A 

NEWSOME, JOHN; Dothan, A 

NEWTON, PATTY; Eufaula, A 

NOLAN, JULIE; Panama City, F 

NORTON, CHARLES; Port St. Joe 

NORTON, SONYAL; Troy, A 

ODANIEL, MICHAEL; Pensacola, F 

ODEN, DEXTER; Sylacauga, A 







During the 1989 school 
year, several students from 
the Education Department 
volunteered to be weekend 
counselors at the world's 
largest handicapped camp, 
Camp ASSCA. Camp ASSCA 
serves children and adults 
with both physical and men- 
tal disabilities from all over 
the Southeast. 

Camp ASSCA is located in 
Jackson Gap, Alabama on 
beautiful Lake Martin. The 
goal of the camp is to give the 
disabled a real-life camping 
experience. While at camp, 
the campers participated in 
fishing, tree climbing, horse- 



back riding, canoeing, and in 
arts and craft with the assis- 
tance of weekend volun- 
teers. 

Being a weeked counselor 
can be scary at first because 
of the insecurity of the 
campers and their disabil- 
ities, but the tension is soon 
released after realizing that 
the shell does not make the 
person. 

These weekends were 
special to the campers and 
the counselors because they 
became the best of friends. 
Why don't you find a friend, 
he or she is only a weekend 
away. 




106 Sophomores 



US r "& 




OHMAN, M ISON Dothan, -m 

OPM HKA, DANIEI . Daniel .'. 

okK. 1 1 k i *SA; Eufa ila, AL 

OSBI kn |OHN III-.. M 

OUT! -UV -\m- AL 

Ol 11 \W, Kin 1 1 Br indidge, M 

OMKsiKH r, LONNII Grove Hill, AL 

OWENS, < H-VKIls Opdika, AL 
OWENS, MAR< US Pln< \pp ■ 
owens, pamii v Headland, al 
OWENS, 51 SAN P i ■ \pple, M 
I'M MER, ii mi, lallahassee Fl 
I'M mi K PATRK k, Contonment, Fl 

PALMER, SARA; Trcn M 

PALMISANO, LISA; Melbourne Beach, il 

CM mori RA< nil, Anniston, AL 
PANHORS1 H snv Mi AL 

PANTON, IENNIFER Laurel Fl 
PANTON, rHOMASj Wesl Palm Beach, FL 
PARRis, DOUCI w < lewiston, FL 
PARRlsil |EREMY; Elba, M 

PASCHAL, TANQl II I '• M 

PATTERSON CERALDINI \ndalusia. AL 
PAYNE, PAUL, Skipperville, m 
PEACOCK, tammv Montgomery, M 
PEACOCK, STEPHANIE; Samson. M 
PECCI, STACY; Orlando, FL 
PELTON, DERRICK; Goshen, AL 

PERRY, ROB; Tuskegec, AL 

PI MNINCTON, ROBERT. Bainbridge, GA 

CI NNINGTON, \\ Vi\l Troy, M 

I'l I LIS, DAVID; Panama City, Fl 

PI I ELS, WARRICK; Montgomery M 

PHILLIPS, CATHARINE; Chapel HI 

PHILLIPS, CRAIG, O/ark, AL 



PHLIPOT, BEVERLY; Greenvilli 
PICKETT, BENITA; Montgom. 
PIERCE, SANDRA, Childersbur* M 
PITTMAN, GREGORY; LuverrK 

PITTMAN, JULIUS; Troy, AL 



PITTS, THERESA; Trov, AL 
POLK, CHARLES, For! Meade, FL 
POLL \k DIANNE; Huntsville M 
POKE, WILLIE; Ashford M 
POPE \\\\ rroy, AL 



POPE, M\RV rroy, M 
PORTER W M I1R Montgon • 
POI N( 1 IAMES Gosrx 
PRATIR MARK Prattville M 

PRICE, VICTORIA, jem.son M 



PRIDGEN, SHERRl. Deruniak Spring! H 

PI CKETl SALLII Blakel) 

PUGH, GREGORY; Unkw M 

Ql INN ZAN Mban) M 

RACH HMOiin Bloomingdale, IL 



RAMSE\ kobiri Port Saint Joe, Fl 
REDOING ik\nk EufauU M 
REDDOC H DONNA rro> M 
rum GREGORY rroj M 

Rllin uws-v Dalevilk 



Sophomore". 10" 



RENFROE, ROBERT; Montgomery, AL 

RIALS, LISA; Grady, AL 

RICE, KIMBERLY; Brundidge, AL 

RICE, TOBERT; Troy, AL 

RICHARDSON, CINA; Marianna, FL 

RICHTER, LOUIS; Sarasota, FL 

RIDDLE, JEFFREY; Jupiter, FL 

RIDCEWAY, DAVID; Enterprise, AL 

RIGGS, ROBIN; Lakeland, FL 

ROACH, JILL; Andalusia, AL 

ROACH, VICKI; Montgomery, AL 

ROARK, MARSHA; Mobile, AL 

ROBINSON, LISA; Venice, FL 

ROGERS, CHARLES; Montgomery, AL 

RODGERS, DAPHNE; Brundidge, AL 

ROMANO, SUZANNE; Cocoa Beach, FL 

RUDOLPH, ERIC; Luverne, AL 

RUSHING, GARY; Goshen, AL 

RUSSELL, STEPHANIE; Millbrook, AL 

RUTHERFORD, ANGELA; Duncanville, AL 

SALLAS, CYNTHIA; Dothan, AL 

SALTER, WENDY; Union Springs, AL 

SANDERS, AMY; Luverne, AL 

SANDERS, BARBARA; Banks, AL 

SANDERS, ELIZABETH; Columbia, AL 

SANDERS, KELLI; Montgomery, AL 

SANDERS, ROBERT; Enterprise, AL 

SANDERS, STACY; Troy, AL 

SASSER, TOMMIE; Brantley, AL 

SCARPINATO, SANDRA; Sarasota, FL 

SCHORN, SHERI; Ft. Lauderdale, FL 

SCOTT, MARTHA; Montgomery, AL 

SCOTT, SUVAUGHN; Troy, AL 

SCOTT, TINA; Troy, AL 

SCOTT, WILLIAM; Montgomery, AL 

SCRUGGS, BRYAN; Quincy, FL 

SEARCY, MILDRED; Montgomery, AL 

SEAY, JANET; Banks, AL 

SELLERS, KATHARINE; Holiday, FL 

SEXTON, FAYE; Strarke, FL 

SHAHADY, JOSEPH; Plantation, FL 

SHAMBURGER, STEVEN; Montgomery, AL 

SHARP, PATRICK; Leeds, AL 

SHEPHERD, THOMAS; Apopka, FL 

SHIVER, NANCY; Dothan, AL 

SHOEMAKER, MARK; Eufaula, AL 

SHORTER, DANIEL; Birmingham, AL 

SHOWS, MARY ASHLEY; Luverne, AL 

SIGERS, JERRELL; Brantley, AL 

SILCOX, GREGORY; Frisco City, AL 

SIMMONS, HERMIA; Atlanta, AL 

SIMS, DAVID; Auburndale, FL 

SIMS, KIMBERLY; Dozier, AL 

SIMS, SUSAN; Brantley, AL 

SIMS, TERESA; McKenzie, AL 

SIMS, TRACI; Luverne, AL 

SIRMON, LISA; Silverhill, AL 

SMELTZER, KARL; Middleburge, AL 

SMITH, AMY; Andalusia, AL 

SMITH, BARRY; Blountsville, AL 

SMITH, BURTON; Huntsville, AL 

SMITH, DAVID; McKenzie, AL 

SMITH, DEBRA; Americus, GA 

SMITH, EVA; Georgiana, AL 

SMITH, KIMBERLY; Brantley, AL 

SMITH, KIMBERLY; Prattville, AL 

SMITH, MICHILE; Hinesville, AL 

SMITH, TIM; Daleville, AL 

SMITH, TOBEY; Daytona Beach, FL 

SNODGRASS, MARK; Brundidge, AL 




108 Sophomores 



WASHINGTON 




firt^S 




sons, iismiik. Lake I'Ij< Id, it 
sim ar, I aw \s\ c. dn ont, ai 

SPIRIS Q( IS". I Al 

5PIVI V Ml< HAEI ' ' 
SPOONER MARY; Way< 

si abiir ikmsi Greenvilk 

Si All WOR III Will lAMj -VI..' ita, CA 

sll \RNs s II I'M AMI. V. AL 

STEPHENS, DEBORAH; llorala, AL 
STEPHI \s k M I •• 
STEPHENSON, ( INDY Fray, AL 
STEPTOE, Bki ( I Cainsville, Fl 
STEWART, \siss.\ Moi AL 

STEWART, kOBfk ; M 

sii wart, SUSAN; rroy, AL 
STONE, LAMES; ( hildersburg, ai 
siklll andriw, Prattville, M 
STROTHER, MARK; Opelika, AL 
STURDIVANI |ESSI< A 
SUJAV HARESH Lroy, AL 
SULLl\ an. rHERESA Brantley, ai 

SULLI\ ANT JULIE; Elba, Al 
SUMMIRIIN LORI; Andalusia. Al 
SI MMERS IOHANNA; rroy, AL 
SUMMIRs STEVEN; Paris, Tn 
SW ANK.AN \sKlk: Cuin, AL 
I ANNIR ANCII A. Troy, AL 
rANNER, CHARLES. Mhens, GA 

TAYLOR di IDRA; Phenb 
TAYLOR, Jl ANNII rroy, AL 
TAYLOR, SAMANTHA, Luverne, AL 
I AMOR TIRRV Tro\, AL 
TAYLOR, WILLIAM; Tros Al 
THIGPEN, FRANK; Greenville, AL 
THOMAS, BESSIE; O/ark VI 

THOMAS, RUSSELL; Goshen, Al 
THOMAS. Will 11 T r ... Al 
THRASH. SON\ A rroj Al 
DDWELL, DONNA Highland Horr. 
TILLERV CYNTHIA; Greenvill) 
TIMBERLAKE, RONALD; Lehigh Acrrs, FL 
TIPPITI DONNA; Clanton, AL 

TIRADO, DONNA Brooksvilk Fl 
riSDALI illllk'i Andalusia, Al 
TISDALE, SANDRA; Goshen Al 
rOLVER MARCELI ar Sdma, AL 
TREAD aw a> CYNTHIA tndalusia, ai 
rROMBI ITA Mil ami rallahassee H 
TUCKER, GEORCI, Brenl AI 

URBIRUltl KRISTA Monroeville, AI 
U rnir KELLY; Vincent ai 

Tl RNIR KIMHIRIV B.n Minette AI 

T i rnir LOIS Luverne ai 
TYLER, Christina Brewton AI 
USSER> ami rroy Al 

V MM Bl sklRK h Walton Braih. FL 

\ arnir KATH\ Moi M 

V \ss \.\SC 'I HdlllvKT II 

VENABLI I ami Ron rallassee ai 
\ k i ( hip Linden ai 
VICK DARRON Pine Hill, AL 
Vl( klR> ( HRISTI McKenzie ai 

\ORRIMR DI BORAH Ozark Al 

w aidin IOSEPH Gadsden Al 

W AIDIN RIBIC < A I lira GA 

WALKER SANDRA Montgomery AL 
w ai HRs KATHY Blaki 
WARR GREGORY AL 

w \RR rOB> Banks M 

W AslllNCTON ANDRI A D.iphr-. 



Sophomon 



WATKINS, MARK; Lake Mary, FL 

WATKINS, PAMELA; Dothan, AL 

WATSON, JAMES; Eufaula, AL 

WATSON, JENNIFER; Cottonwood, AL 

WATSON, JOSEPH; Troy, AL 

WATTS, GARY; Daleville, AL 

WATTS, TIFFANY; Bay Minette, AL 

WEAVER, HARLIN; Clayton, 

WEBB, NINA JO; Prattville, 

WEST, CARLETTE; Selma, 

WESTBROOK, JANA; Elba, 

WESTMORELAND, SAMUEL; Beaumont, 

WHATLEY, SHERRY; Andalusia, 

WHITE, CARL; Port St. Joe 

WHITE, JOHN; Ozark, 

WHITE, SHEREE; Troy, 

WHITEHEAD, MISTY; Elba, 

WHITEHEAD, RHONDA; Dothan, 

WILKES, MICHAEL; Troy, 

WILKINS, ROBERT; Troy, 

WILKINSON, JEFF; Brundidge, 

WILLIAM, JACK; Chipley 

WILLIAMS, ANTHONY; Troy, 

WILLIAMS, DOTTIE; Montgomery, 

WILLIAMS, DOUGLAS; Titusville 

WILLIAMS, FELDMAN; New Augusta, 

WILLIAMS, LISA; Semmes, 

WILLIAMS, MARLA; Clayton, 

WILLIAMS, SHIRLEY; Blakely, 

WILLIAMS, VIVIAN; Milton, 

WILLIAMSON, YVETTE; Labelle 

WILLIFORD, ALISON; Troy, 

WILSON, ANTHONY; Frisco City, 

WILSON, KIMBERLY; Tifton, 

WILSON, MARIE; Goshen, 

WILSON, SHARLA; Brundidge, AL 

WINDHAM, PAMELA; Elba, AL 

WINDHAM, THOMAS; Luverne, AL 

WISE, JAMES; Elba, AL 

WISMER, SUSAN; Opp, AL 

WOLFE, JOHN; Union Springs, AL 

WOLFORD, MIKE; Flomaton, AL 





110 Sophomores 







Lisa Palmisano has been 
running competitively since 
she was a sophomore in high 
school. Running comes easy 
to her. Between her sopho- 
more and senior years, she 
competed in short races, 
from the mile to the 10k (6.2 
miles). She wanted to know 
what running a marathon was 
like, and in December 1986, 
she found out! 

After running the 26.2 mile 
run in three hours and 52 
minutes without stopping, 
she felt great! But vouched 
that it was one thing she 
would never try twice! 

Almost three years later, 
Lisa found herself filling out 
an application to run the 
New York City Marathon. 
This race attracts runners 



from over 80 countries and 
has about 25,000 entries. "I 
asked myself if I was being re- 
alistic about my decision. I 
knew I would have to train 
specifically for this race, and 
with the shape I was in, I was 
skeptical, " she said. 

The New York City Mara- 
thon was on November 6, 
1988. Her boyfriend, Kenny, 
was making the trip with her. 

Lisa had everything 
packed, or at least she 
thought she did. At Mont- 
gomery Airport Lisa realized 
that she had left a duffel bag 
in Troy. In this duffel bag 
were her running shoes!! Just 
the night before her parents 
joked with her about forget- 
ting her running shoes - and 
she just laughed at them. 




i-^ 



wood, brias, Eufaula 
WOOD. WILLIAM; Hi i 




WOODHAM, SAMANTHA. Monty 
WOODHAM, KRYSTAL; Dothan, -VI 



WOODS, THOMAS; Panama ( 
WOZNY, JAMES; Randolph. Al 



WRIGHT, CATHERINE; Montgomery M 
YOUNG, BARBARA; Montgomery, AL 



ZIMMERMAN, MICHAEL; Ozark. M 



Kenny's mom and Jason 
Stephenson made sure she 
had her shoes "overnight". 
Now what else could go 
wrong? 

Anxious to run on Sunday, 
Lisa rose at 5:00 am. She had 
to be at the New York Public 
Library by 7:am to catch the 
bus to Staten Island. 

Finally at 10:30 am, 25,000 
runners piled together at the 
start, and Lisa was crunched 
between six foreign runners 
that did not use Dial. The 
cannon went off, and Lisa fi- 
nally started to run. "Some 
runners were dressed in cos- 
tumes. One runner carried a 
birthday cake and another 
was even painting an oil pi< - 
ture," Palmisano said. 

Lisa started feeling pain at 
about the 15th mile. Her 
knees were numb and her 
feet were r.m. \t the 18th 



mile, she started to feel de- 
pressed and wanted to qui- 
t."All I wanted to do was eat a 
hot pretzel and lie down, 
she said. 

She entered Central Park 
with only three miles left in 
the race. Passing a guy run- 
ning with his dog, Palmisano 
remembers thinking, "It that 
dog could make it on four 
legs, I knew I could make it 
on two." 

As she sprinted across the 
finish line and almost col- 
lapsed, she received a medal 
and a bottle of cold water. 

Although her time ot five 
hours and 28 minutes was 
way ott her goal of four hours 
and 30 minutes, she accom- 
plished a feat that not many 
people could evei dream ol 
doing. As for running an- 
other marathon - FORGET 
IT!! 



Sophomore 1 1 1 



JUNIORS 




ABERCROMBIE, WILLIAM; Troy, AL 

ADAMS, ROWENA; Goodwater, AL 

ADAMS, SUZANNE; Gulf Shores, AL 

ADAMS, TAMMY; Fort Deposit, AL 

AGEE, LOUIS; Daphne, AL 

AIKEN, FRANKLIN; Mobile, AL 

ALAND, BEVERLY; Largo, FL 

ALEXANDER, DEAN; Caiera, AL 

ALDRICH, JERRY; Phenix City, AL 

ALICEA, ALBERT; Miami, FL 

ALLEN, PAT; Troy, AL 

ALSUP, KEVIN; Winter Haven, FL 

AMISON, SONYA; Elba, AL 

ANDERSON, DONNA; Bellwood, AL 

ANDERSON, ERIC; Chancellor, AL 

ANDERSON, GARY; Orange Lake, FL 

ANDERSON, JASON; Enterprise, AL 

ANDERSON, JULIE; Thomasville, AL 

ANDERSON, SHARHONDA; Grady, AL 

ANDERSON, TAMMY; Whigam, GA 

ANDERSON, TRINA; Bainbridge, GA 

ANDREWS, CELESTE; Dothan, AL 

APLIN, DEBORAH; Andalusia, AL 

ARMSTRONG, WILBURN; Ramer, AL 

ARNOLD, SHERYL; Montrose, PA 

ARTHUR, DONALD; Niceville, FL 

ATES, SCOTTIE; Andalusia, AL 

ATKINS, TIMOTHY; Pelham, AL 

ATKINSON, THOMAS; Birmingham, AL 

AULTMAN, MARY; Troy, AL 

BAKER, DEBBIE; Ariton, AL 

BAKER, RANDAL; Childersburg, AL 

BARBER, DEBORAH; Gulf Breeze, FL 

BARBOSA, VICTOR; Framingham, MS 

BARRETT, JEFFREY; Mesa, Ml 

BATES, RICHARD; Lakeland, FL 

BATTISSTELLI, FRANK; Satellite Beach, FL 

BAXLEY, JENNIFER; Montgomery, AL 

BELL, DANA; Montgomery, AL 

BELL, DOUGLAS; Donalsonville, GA 

BELL, JOHN; Troy, AL 

BELL, JUDY; Troy, AL 

BENDER, JANET; Greenville, AL 

BENN, ERIC; Selma, AL 

BENTKOWSKI, GENA; Aiea, HI 

BETZOLD, PETER; Southington, CT 

BLACK, CAROLYN; Troy, AL 

BLACKMON, ELIZABETH; Grand Bay, AL 

BLAIR, DEBRA; Elba, AL 

BLOODWORTH, SHARON; Leary, GA 

BLUE, KELLI; Tampa, FL 

BOATNER, PHILLIP; Columbus, GA 

BOLES, JEFFREY; Alexander City, AL 

BOOTH, REGINA; Troy, AL 

BONCE, GILBERTO; Miami, FL 

BOSHELL, ALVIN; Ft. Lauderdale, FL 

BOSHELL, CHERIE; Haleyville, AL 

BOUTWELL, ELECIA; Brundidge, AL 

BOUTWELL, RICHARD; Greenville, AL 

BOWDOIN, GARY; Louisville, AL 

BOWEN, CAROL; Ashford, AL 

BOZEMAN, STEPHEN; Georgiana, AL 

BRACKIN, JUDY; Dothan, AL 








mm. 



112 Juniors 








ftHtfirl 




IP'A 



hkmji n. BRIAN; I nterprise, AL 
BRADI EY 5ARAH Pens* ola, fi 
BRAN( Mil IZABI IH Montgom. ■ 
BRAY BONNII r roy M 

uKii r, judith r» ai 

BRITTON DAVI ; M ry, AL 

BROCiKs. FREDDIE; r ro> M 

BROUSSARD, IE AN; Tro\. M 
BROUs DONNA; Dothan, M 
brown MIRIAM; Opelika, Al 
BROWN PHYI \M< ' 
BROWN RIBK.C K, W< M 

BROWN, TAIRITA; Cavendish. \ T 
bri ( I robirt. Enterprise, M 

bry \nt. \i \n Leeds M 

BRYANT, IANICE; Troy, AL 

BRYANT, PENNY Troy, AL 

Bl ihiir GINA; Enterprise, AL 

BUIS, PAULINE; O/.irL M 

BUSH, JACQUHIM Monroeville M 

BUSH, JONATHAN; Jackson, AL 

BURKHALTER, APRIL; Auburn, AL 
( MN BRIAN; Grand Ba\. M 
( ms irk Wetumpka, M 
CALl \ns mi i y Newville, AL 
CAMPBELL, |AMES; Louisull. 
CAMPBELL-DANSBY, PAILV Troy, M 
CAMBELL 1 \MMY; Georgiana, M 

CANNON, MICHAEL; Ozark M 
CAPPS, hinry i nion Springs AL 
CAPP^ ION Headland, M 
CAPPS, MELANIE; Camden, \l 
( \RMACK, D( \w \ Notasulga m 

( \RNEGIA, PAMII \ Monigorru 
CAROL, BROWN Tro) M 

CARPI Nil R, SCOTT; Louisville, \L 
CARPIntir STEVEN Brantley *L 
( \rriir iiwiiir Evergreen M 
( -\RROU Kl\ IN Columbu- 
( \RIIR DERRICK Trcn M 

CARTER GARY Mabeville, M 
CASH i NTAK; Daleville, M 

CEASE, DIANE; Harrison. TN 
CELKA CHRISTOPHER Wetumpka, Al 
CHAMPION BRADLEY Marietta, GA 
C HANDI IK t HERYL; Goshen M 
CHEHY VNDRIW Birmingham \L 
CHFMM 1 c KSSANDR \ lr< • M 
CLARK PAME1 \ Lake Cit) fi 

CLEMENTS, PEGGY; Montgomer . 

COMh (AMES; Eeds M 

COMh SI \t l> BomUs FL 

COBB BRENDA lallassee M 
COBB WENDY Ozark M 
COE Kim Tro) M 
COLEY LAMES Montgomer) M 

COLLINS MICHELLE; Dothan, Al 
c OMPTON Ti \ i jveri 
( ook GLEN Farmersville, *L 
cook TIMOTHY Brewton M 

C OOPIR SI W y Columbia 
COPI1 \nd \Ni.n \ Brun 
COPII \NI) mmimiw LaGrai •• I v 



Juniors 113 



CORBITT, KARA; Crestview, FL 

CORDREY, STANLEY; Haleyville, AL 

CORRIDORI, DESA; Ozark, AL 

COTTINCHAM, GENE; Jay, FL 

CRAWLEY, JAINE; Ariton, AL 

CREEK, GLORIA; Troy, AL 

CRISWELL, RODNEY; Bay Minette, AL 

CROWSON, NORMA; Montgomery, AL 

CROWSON, LEXIE; Tallassee, AL 

CULPEPPER, ART; Andalusia, AL 

CUMMINGS, STACEY; Daphne, AL 

CURRY, BETH; Fort Myers, FL 

CURRY, STEVE; Opelika, AL 

CURTIS, PHILLIP; Huntsville, AL 

DAILEY, THOMAS; Pensacola, FL 

DAMREN, JOHN; Elba, AL 

DANEK, DANA; Homosassa, AL 

DARBY, LATONYA; Frisco City, AL 

DAVIDSON, SARAH; Montgomery, AL 

DAVIS, CHERINA; Andalusia, AL 

DAVIS, DEMEA; Highland Home, AL 

DAVIS, HARRY; Niceville, AL 

DAVIS, LISA; Ft. Deposit, AL 

DAVIS, RODERICK; Mobile, AL 

DAVIS, STEPHEN; Elba, AL 

DAW, ANGELA; Monroeville, AL 

DAWSON, DAVID; Ozark, AL 

DEAN, JACK; Mobile, AL 

DEESE, SCOTTY; Dothan, AL 

DEHLIC, CHRISTOPHER; Paola, KS 

DIMISA, JOSEPH; Tampa, FL 

DINSMORE, GEORGE; Cape Coral, FL 

DOWNING, DAVID; Monticello, FL 

DOZIER, LESLIE; Hurtsboro, AL 

DUGGAN, ELIZABETH; Andalusia, AL 

DUNCAN, HELEN; Troy, AL 

DUNN, BRIAN; Gadsden, AL 

DUNN, ERIC; Jesep, GA 

DUNN, LORI; Atmore, AL 

DUTTON, SABRINA; Phenix City, AL 

DWYER, DANIEL; Troy, Al 

DYE, ELIZABETH; Tallahassee, FL 

DYESS, KRISTA; Elba, AL 

DYKE, RICHARD; Fairhope, AL 

EDWARDS, DANIEL; Crestview, FL 

ELLIS, DAYNA; Troy, AL 

ELLIS, JEFFREY; Mobile, Al 

ELLISON, JAMES; Eufaula, AL 

ELLSWORTH, ROXANNE; Troy, AL 

ELMORE, SHEILA; Slocomb, AL 

ENGLISH, CARA; Elba, AL 

ENGLISH, JAMES; Elba, AL 

ETHERIDGE, JOHNNY; Evergreen, AL 

ETZWILER, NAOMI; Ft. Walton Beach, FL 

EVERETT, CATHY; Greenville, AL 

FARMER, CHARLA; Troy, AL 

FARMER, CYNTHIA; Dothan, AL 

FARMER, KIMBERLY; Abbeville, AL 

FARRIOR, GAYLEN; Eufaula, AL 

FENN, JAY; Louisville, AL 

FIVIAN, MICHELLE; Dayton, OH 

FLOWERS, SCOTT; Elba, AL 

FOOTE, ANDRIA; Ozark, AL 

FOUNTAIN, SUSAN; Evergreen, AL 

FOURNIER, ANDREA; Troy, AL 

FRANKLIN, LAURA; Enterprise, AL 

FRAZIER, CURTIS; Enterprise, AL 

FREE, TONYA; Luverne, AL 

FRYE, DIANA; Enterprise, AL 

FULLER, KIMBERLY; Montgomery, AL 









>ft f> ft & fi *- K 

flP^ T£j* ft to i<r 



114 Juniors 




fi © 0i 



w +™L<m 











ft £!<>.£<* A£ 




FULLIK Usui. Marion, ai 
FUQl -V JOSEPH; Brewtoi Al 
CADDIE, MAR\ Panan 
CAMBLI Rohiri Wd ■ 
GAMMII i AMY; Enterprise ai 
CANT, CYNTHIA; R fi 

GANTT, MAR\ LEIGH Andalusia, AL 

CAV I aw rim i, Sarasota, H 
GEORU joni. HunUville, AL 
CHEE, BRENDA; Beatrice, M 
GlBHs KEVIN; Florala, ai 
GILES, jenniiir rroy, AL 
CILIls STEPHEN; Montgon ery, AL 
CIRDNER, MIRIBI TH. Troy, AL 

CLADWELL, CLAUDE; Iro) U 
CLASS, CAR 1 . • Al 

GLOVER, |APOM( \; Mobile, AL 
GOEBEL, DAVID; Ocala II 
GOODWIN, APRIL, Grand Rid*.-, FL 
GORIY MK MFLLE; Plantation, FL 
GOREY, STEPHEN; Plantation, FL 

GRAHAM, AMY; Mpine, AL 

GRAM, VOLANDA; Montgomery, AL 

GRAYSON, \ AIIRII. Mobili 

GREEN |OHN; rroy M 

GREGORY ANDREW Treasure Island, FL 

GULLEDCE, VONDA; Clayton AL 

GUNTER, WILLIAM; Perrj 

HAGADORN. TAMMY; Ml Dora, FL 
HALL, PAMELA, Milton, FL 
HAMMONS, ANGELA. Scottsboro. AL 
HANCOCK, LARRY; Tro. AL 
HAND, MICHAEL; Folev. M 
HARBIN, LEE ANN; Panama Citv. FL 
HARP, THOMAS; Brewton, AL 

HARRELSON. JERRY. Evergreen, AL 
HARRIS. ALDREY, Monroeville Al 
HARRIS, RALPH; Albans. GA 
HARRISON RICHARD Tuskegee. AL 
HARRISON ROLAND Tuskegee, AL 
HARWOOD. BRENT; Pensacok- rL 
HASLEY. RITA; Georgianna. AL 

HASSEY, SHERRY. Grad\. AL 
HAYES. BARBARA. Coral Gables. FL 
HAYNER. ALISA; Tro*. AL 
HEAD. ROLAND; Niceville, FL 
HEARD. LISA; Smiths AL 
HEATON, KIMBERLY; Thomassille AL 
HELMS, JAMES; Brundidge, AL 

HELMS, JANE Milton. FL 
HENDERSON STARLA, Elba AL 
HERRING. JAMES. Ozari 
HICE, RICHARD Lakeland, FL 
HILL, MICH AIL Elba Al 

HlPPS. Darren Sarasota, FL 
HIVES, REHOBETH; Mobile Al 

HIXON I AL RA; Banks Al 
HOFFMAN kinnith Coral Spring 

HOG AN ANITA Dothan. AL 
HOLLAND MARC I >< ( entur) D 
HOLLAND TAMMII Eufaula, AL 
HOLLEY PIRRY Lockhart AL 

HOLLiNC, mari! Montgomer) al 

HOLMfs SONDRA rroj m 

HORN! REGINA Marion AL 
HOC CH RANDALI Orlando FL 
HOLSER, JEFFIRY Moffl AL 

HOW ARD TODD C rosin TV 
HOWELI MMBFR1Y Chancellor AL 
HOWES. ERIC; Sarasota. FL 



Juniors Hi 



HOVEY, WILMER; Camp Hill, AL 

HUDON, SENECAL; Luverne, AL 

HUDSON, ANN; Boca, Grande, FL 

HUDSON, STARLA; Freeport, FL 

HUGHES, DEANNA; Eufaula, AL 

HUGHES, JOSEPH; Panama City, FL 

HUGHES, SELINA; Ozark, AL 

HUGHES, STEPHANIE; Goshen, AL 

HUGHEY, ANGELA; Marion, AL 

HUNT, TODD; Bradendton, FL 

HYDE, STEPHANIE; Andalusia, AL 

IRVIN, DAVID; Cussetta, AL 

ISOM, CAROLYN; Abbeville, AL 

JACKSON, ANGELA; Ariton, AL 

JACKSON, JANE; Dothan, AL 

JACKSON, MARY; Montgomery, AL 

JACKSON, STEPHEN; Bay Minette, AL 

JACKSON, TONY; Blakey, GA 

JACOBS, TIMOTHY; Warrior, AL 

JAMES, JUNIOR; Troy, AL 

JAMES, TIMOTHY; Troy, AL 

JAMES, VALERIE; Troy, AL 

JINRIGHT, WILLIAM; Troy, AL 

JINRIGHT, YVETT; Grady, AL 

JOHNSON, ALICE; Coden, AL 

JOHNSON, DARLENE; Mobile, AL 

JOHNSON, EDWIN; Grand Ridge, FL 

JOHNSON, KIM; Cairo, GA 

JOHNSON, RONNIE; Georgianna, AL 

JONES, BRETT; Pelham, AL 

JONES, GARY; Greenville, AL 

JONES, KENNETH; Northport, AL 

JONES, LESLIE; Jacksonville, FL 

JONES, MARILYN; Troy, AL 

JONES, TIMOTHY; Greenville, AL 

JONES, TROY; Dothan, AL 

JORDAN, TAMMY; Troy, AL 

JORDAN, THOMAS; Troy, AL 

JOSEPH, PIERRE; Tampa, FL 

JUSTICE, ANGELA; New Port Richey, FL 

KEEL, MARY; Dothan, AL 

KELLY, DEBRA; Troy, AL 

KELLEY, DENNIS; Chancellor, AL 

KELLEY, JAMES; Elba, AL 

KELLEY, MARIAN; Troy, AL 

KELLEY, YOLANDA; Montgomery, AL 

KENNEDY, ALLEN; Luverne, AL 

KING, JENNIFER; Rolling Meadows, IL 

KING, SHERWANNA; Marlon, AL 

KING, TROY; Montgomery, AL 

KIRBY, SHARON; Valley, AL 

KIRKLAND, MONTY; Opp, AL 

KNIGHT, JOSEPH; Zephyrhillis, FL 

KNIGHT, KIM; Prichard, AL 

KNIGHT, STEPHANIE; Newton, AL 

KNIGHTEN, ROBERT; Goshen, AL 

KOBET, CYNTHIA; Scottsboro, AL 

KREBS, CHRISTOPHER; Kenosha, Wl 

KUMMEL, ANTHONY; Troy, AL 

LAGUARDIA, MARK; Florala, AL 

LAMBERT, CHARLES; Troy, AL 

LAMBERT, ROBERT; Dothan, AL 

LARIMER, AMY; Coshocton, OH 

LARRIMORE, DAVID; Thomasville, AL 

LARUE, SHARI; Enterprise, AL 

LAVERCOMBE, JILL; Birmingham, AL 

LAW, FRED; Union Springs, AL 

LAWS, DARCELLE; Troy, AL 

LEAVITT, JEWEL; Troy, AL 

LEDFORD, KIMBERLY; Ozark, AL 




l (/ I I ,,. A 




116 Juniors 




Siyma @ 6c fo t/ie TRe&ccie 



l raternity guys strike feai into 
the hearts of many. They stay 
out too late, drink too muc h 
and skip too many classes. 

I lowever, their image may be 
changing, thanks to at least 
three Sigma Chi brothers. Bill 
Gauspohl, Ken Merriman and 
Greg Willis are all helping citi- 
zens of Troy and Pike County by 
working with a local ambulance 
service. 

"Bill and I are drivers and Ken 
is an intermediate," said Willis. 
Drivers assist paramedics and 
intermediates, who are more 
advanced, work some with the 
patients, Willis added. 

"We must do whatever the 
situation calls for," Willis said. 
"Our basic duty is to work with 
paramedics to provide emer- 
gency medical care for the peo- 
ple of Pike County." 

"You have to have a strong 



stomach and enjoy helping 
people because the rewards 
definitely aren't monetary," 
Willis said. 
Wrecks involving friends are 

espe< Lilly diffk ult, said W ilhs 
"If a car looks familiar, I some- 
times (,it(h my breath, but I 
(.innot let it interfere with my 
work," he said. 

"Ungrateful people are also 
abundant," said Willis. "It seems 
people would be more appre- 
ciative." 

"It is sometimes difficult 
when I get an emergency call in 
the middle of the night, and I 
still have to make an early class 
in the morning," he said. 

Willis is currently taking man- 
agement classes. After he leaves 
TSU, he will attend school two 
more years to complete his fire 
engineering and safety techni- 
cian degree. 




LEDFORD, RICHARD; Ozark M 
LEE, DANIEL; Troy, AL 

LEE, VAUGHN; Ohatchee Al 
LEGC, DANIEL; Knoxulle, TN 
LEWIS, LISA; Eustis, FL 
LEWIS, WILLIAM; Jackson, AL 
LiDH, TODD; Andalusia. AL 

LINEBERCER, TRAVIS Fl Walton Beach. FL 
STACI, LINSEY; High Springs, FL 
LITTLE, LUTHER; Troy, AL 
LIVINGSTON, TAMMV Mathews. Al 
LOTT, M.LYSON; Montgomery M 
LOVFALD, KARi. si Petersburg Fl 
LOWE, \NGELA; Gordon Al 
LOWI. S\N( V Tun \[ 
LOZZl. [ENNIFER; Tampa M 
LUCK, STACI V Enterprise M 
LYNCH MICHAEL; Greenville M 
MACON, LADOSW VAelumpka M 

MAGLIONE, RICK. Plantation M 
MAHMin [AMES Union Springs M 
MARSHALL, RONALD; Midland Cits M 
MARTIN BOYD; Brewton M 
MARTIN I ammh ruskegee M 
MARTINSON (II f OlMlk M 
mm rHEWS (AMES Vero Beat h FL 
MA\ ROBER1 I olumbia \l 
MCALISTER I \Rl \ Dothan M 
McCALL, ALLIN Tro) M 
Ma mi K>HN Fitzgerald \i 
sue wis REGINALD Mmorc Al 
m>( \Rim RICHARD rroj M 
M( CLUNG, JOHN rrO) M 
McCONNELI MrCHAEI rote) Al 

McCORMICK DONN\ Goshen AL 



Juniors 113 



MCCRACKEN 



MCCRACKEN, CHRIS; Troy, AL 

MCCURDY, REESE; Troy, AL 

MCDONALD, RICHARD; Columbus, GA 

MCEWAN, PAMELA; Sarasota, FL 

MCFILLEN, PATRICIA; Dothan, AL 

MCCHEE, WENDY; Rutledge, AL 

MCGILL, DEBORAH; Alachua, FL 

MCCUIRE, FEBRA; Troy, AL 

MCHENRY, WILLIAM; Jay, FL 

MCKEOWN, WILLIAM; Quincy, FL 

McKETHAN, DARREN; Brooksville, FL 

MCKINNON, ROBERT; Clanton, AL 

MCLENDON, SHERI; Troy, AL 

MCLEOD, ROBERT; Troy, AL 

MCLEOD, WILLIAM; Troy, AL 

MCSWAIN, SHARON; Troy, AL 

MCWHORTER, SUSAN; Troy, AL 

MEADOWS, JULIE; High Springs, FL 

MEEK, PATRICK; Elba, AL 

MELTON, STONEY; Florence, SC 

MEREDITH, VOTIE; Enterprise, AL 

MERRILL, AUDREY; Heflin, AL 

MESSICK, RANDALL; Troy, AL 

MILAM, JOSEPH; Enterprise, AL 

MILES, PARALEE; Midway, AL 

MILLER, MICHAEL; Montgomery, AL 

MIMS, DOUGLAS; Dothan, AL 

MITCHELL, KENDRA; Bonifay, FL 

MITCHELL, SCOTT; Riverdale, GA 

MOBLEY, ANGELA; Brundidge, AL 

MOBLEY, KATHY; Brundidge, AL 

MONCRIEF, MARY; Mobile, AL 

MOORE, CARNETRIS; Athens, AL 

MOORE, PAULA; Marianna, FL 

MOORE, WANDA; Laurel Hill, FL 

MOREMAN, EDWIN; Opelika, AL 

MORGAN, CHRISTINE; Troy, AL 

MORGAN, MEREDITH; Camden, AL 

MORRIS, MELISSA; Troy, Al 

MORROW, KAREN; Elba, AL 

MORTELLARO, JERRY; Brantley, AL 

MORTON, MICHAEL; Jackson, AL 

MOTES, JANET; Troy, AL 

MOTON, GAIL; Dothan, AL 

MOYE, TAMMIE; Troy, AL 

MULLINS, RONNIE; Montgomery, AL 

MURPHREE, STEVE; Columbus, GA 

NEELY,CHARLES; Ft. Walton, FL 

NICHOLS, LOIS; Marion, AL 

NICHOLSON, HARLEY; Banks, AL 

NEWMAN, ROBERT; Montgomery, AL 

NOLIN, DALE; New Brockton, AL 

NORDMEYER, FREDRICK; Brewton, AL 

NORRIS, JACQUELINE; Andualusia, AL 

NORRIS, SCOTT; Lakeland, FL 

OATES, SHERRIE; Prattville, AL 

O'CONNOR, SHANNON; Fitzgerald, GA 

ODOM, SHERRY; Dothan, AL 

ODOM, SHONDA; McKenzie, AL 

OGBURN, GENA; Geneva, AL 

OROZCO, SONDRA; Montgomery, AL 

PADGETT, KELLY; Atmore, AL 

PAGE, ANGELA; Dothan, AL 

PANTON, JENNIFER; West Palm Beach, FL 

PARAMORE, MICHAEL; Ariton, AL 

PARRISH, KEVIN; Warner Robbins, GA 

PAYNE, ALICIA; Ozark, AL 

PAYNE, KEVIN; Troy, AL 

PAYNE, MICHELE; Troy, AL 

PEACOCK, ANGELA; Troy, AL 




r 



AffRRi'3 




118 Juniors 





p £>( P ffl 




PI \< o< k ( HARLES Planl ( ity n 
PI \< ()( k ! ammv lr. 
cm CI, rRACY; Orlando Fl 
PEOPLES kinm m. Slocomb, AL 
phiii IPs SAMI EL; Ozarl 
PHII I IPS, STA< II Sh» omb, AL 
PHILI IPS l -\mm> Triton, Al 

PIER( l . FELK IAj Fairhope, M 
prk I KELLY; Loganville, GA 

1*01 rHOMAS i iscal M 

coi ish, I mii \ Deei Lodge Ml 

f'OII \KD V AIIRI. Jr.,. 

POWELI DONNYj Andalusia, Al 

PUGH, ANGELA, Grow Hill Al 

PI CH LESLEY; rhomasville, M 
QUARLES. SUSAN, Troy. AL 
RAHMING, DIANNE; Nassau, Bahamas 
RAINES AMI Dothan, Al 
RAINEY, DAVID Brundidge, Al 
RAW l S, |AMES; Auburi 
Kliu ANTHONY Haynesville M 

REMUS. WILLIAM; Palatine, II 
RESPRESS In and a. Dothan, Al 
RHODES. |AMES; lr... AL 
RICHARDSON CHARLES; Rutledge Al 

RICHARDSON KIM It.,. Al 

RIDGWAY, m-\ris-\. Enterprise ai 
RILEY, BRIAN; Andalusia Al 

RILEVSHfRRV Durant, MS 
ROBIKis KATHY; El lectfa M 

ROBINI ITI TR A< I Anion Al 

ROBInsos EMMA Banks AL 
ROBINSON RECINA; rroy, Al 
RONEY, w M MR Selma M 
ROSE, mark Dayton, OH 

ROSE, MK HAEI Venice Fl 

ROSENIRM1R Rl TH O/jrk Al 
ROVVSER. RODNIN Drmopolis. Al 
Rl SNAK BELINDA; Easl Brevston. AL 
RUSSELL, DO! CI AS; Hi/abcThiovsn NC 
SANDIRV DON Ml > OH 

SANDERS I M RA. Mlanta, l 

SAUUs |OSH Guntersville, AL 

SAI ndirs i DDK. Atlanta, GA 

St ARBOROLUGH BARR1 Frostprool Fl 

St HERI w \Df rro> Al 

SCOTT. CHRISTOPHER, O/ark Al 

SCOTT hmm> Ozarfc AI 

SI \Rs. TOBI. Lake Placid N\ 

SEI l PATS\ Mexando I '• 
SELLERS ( vki Greenville Al 
SEWELI ANDREW Selma Al 

s|l\NK |ODI TtO) M 

SHARPI I ii H Andalusia M 

SHI PARD sMl ANII ( astleben • Al 

SHERIDAN BRENDA Rivet Falls Al 

SHOEMAKER MICHAEI ChiWersburf 
SHONK RHONDA Oari 

SHUMPiRi win n Paducah k> 
simpson kinn Newnan 
SIMPSON PAMI : ' M 

simpson PETER Pensaoola Fl 
sims i \iiii Enterprise M 

sims STEVEN CreenvH • 
SINGLETON iod\ Newville Al 
ski IN LISA Ozark M 

SKEI TON KIIIH > \l 

SKOWRON si SAN Fl 

SMELSER LYNNI Andalusia Al 
smith ( aRLOTI \ Mobile AL 



luniors 1 1 <=» 



SMITH, DEREK; New Brockton, AL 

SMITH, DONALD; Eufaula, AL 

SMITH, GLEN; Troy, AL 

SMITH, HEATHERLY; Kinston, AL 

SMITH, JEFFREY; Chattanooga, TN 

SMITH, KITTIE; Wetumpka, AL 

SMITH, LEE; Pine Hill, AL 

SMITH, MICHAEL; Enterprise, AL 

SMITH, PENELOPE; Opp, AL 

SMITH, TIMOTHY; Montgomery, AL 

SNIDER, CHRISTOPHER; Dothan, AL 

SOBOTTKA, DIANA; Troy, AL 

SOTO, GINA; Montgomery, AL 

SOUTH, CINDY; Bessemer, AL 

SPIVEY, ARTHUR; Charles Town, WV 

SPRACUE, LISA; Fort Walton, FL 

STAFFORD, GREGORY; Hudson, FL 

STANDERFER, WILLIAMS; Albany, GA 

STARCHER, RUSSELL; Venice, FL 

STEELE, SUZANNE; ENTERPRISE, AL 

STEVENS, ELEANOR; Troy, AL 

STEWART, CHRISTI; Pensacola, FL 

STEWART, SHANNON; Millbrook, AL 

STINNETT MELISSA; Ariton, AL 

STREET, HAROLD; Fairhope, AL 

STREETS, SHERYL; Birmingham, AL 

STEINER, JEFFREY; Erie, PA 

STEPHENS, LISA; Goshen, AL 

STEWART, TERRI; Ashford, AL 

STIVERS, CAROL; Andalusia, AL 

STRICKLAND, AMY; Newville, AL 

STRICKLAND, MARK; Eclectic, AL 

STUMP, JASON; Andalusia, Al 

SUMMERALL, DAVID; Vero Beach, FL 

SUMNER, ELIZABETH; Camden, AL 

SUTHERLAND, SUSAN; Haleyville, AL 

SVIGLIN, HELENA; Troy, AL 

SVOPA, STEVE; Coral Springs, FL 

SWEAT, LEWIS; Waxhaw, NC 

TARVER, MELISA; Montgomery, AL 

TAYLOR, DEANNA; Auburndale, FL 

TAYLOR, LISA; Kissimmee, Fl 

TAYLOR, JAMES; Tallassee, AL 

TAUNTON, RENA; Tallassee, AL 

TERRELL, ANDREW; Ozark, AL 

TEW, TIMOTHY; Echo, AL 

THAMES, MIRIAM; Beatrice, AL 

THOMAS, FLORENCE; Westville, FL 

THOMAS, LESIA; Geneva, AL 

THOMAS, SALLY; Goshen, AL 

THOMPSON, JULIE; Greenville, AL 

THOMPSON, KENNETH; Enterprise, AL 

THORPE, JULIE; Lakeland, FL 

TIMBS, TABATHA; Bessember, AL 

TIPTON, CHARLES; Dade City, FL 

TODD, ELIZABETH; Butler, AL 

TODD, STACY; Sebring, FL 

TOLBERT, ROBERT; Troy, AL 

TRATHOWEN, CARO; Valrico, FL 

TRAVIS, MARGARET; Sarasota, FL 

TREADWELL, MICHAEL; Brundidge, AL 

TRIPPI, MICHAEL; Lapine, AL 

TROMBETTA, MARY; Tallahassee, FL 

TRUESDELL, DENNIS; Seale, AL 

TRUCKER, AMANDA; Gadsden, AL 

TUCKER, ANGIE; Ariton, AL 

TUCKER, JILL; Honoraville, AL 

TURBERVILLE, CATHY; Monroeville, AL 

TURNER, AMY; Dothan, AL 

TURNER, ANGELA; Troy, Al 





120 Juniors 








\ M<MV SAMANTHA; ()/..rk, Al 
VINSON, |IMM ■ '.,11 

VINSON sl|| | .\ .Nf,j.,lusid, Al 

w addinmon. MK mil i Leawood • 
w \l)l w and a. Webb, Al 
w adkowsm PAI i •• n> 

w mi OKI) nNA B 

w 4GNER ROCER1 Birmingham, AL 

w aidin. SCOT! \ 
w mkik RAYMOND; Ozarf ai 
WALL\( I SHERRY; Enterpri • 
W Al 1 1 Rs, WIND'. Fl 

WALTERS, Rl hi rro> Al 

W Ml A< I MHKK1. MontgOl 

w \RRlv DANIELLE; Uexandei I •■ ai 
WASHINGTON, adrhnni. Mobile M 
w aiirs (,iok(,i Fairhope, ai 
WATIIV rHERON; Fairhope, AL 
WATSON. BELINDA; Andalusia. Al 
WATSON mark Monroeville, Al 
WATilRs |i smiir Selma, al 

WEATHERFORD, ELIZABETH; Lnah, AL 

WELCH riM Sarasota, n 
WHALEY, IOSEPH Port St )<•<• Fl 
WHATliV ROHIRI Montgon .-. Al 
WHELPLEV |AMES; Huntsville, Al 
WHETSTONE, KIMBERLON Montgotm 
WHIDDON IINNlfIR Idveitc. AL 

WHITE, REGINA; Troy, AL 
WHITE, Rl TH Rapid < Ity, SD 
WIGGINS miikri Kinston Al 
WILKINS GREGORY; Troy, Al 

WILKES, CHRIS; Goshen, AL 
WIIIIAMS, CASs\\|)K A Dothan, AL 
WILLIAMS CHARlll Fl W .ilton Beach, FL 

WILLIAMS, MICHELLE; Bowling Green tO 
WILLAIMS, Mil TON Troj Al 
WILLIAMS, SAMUEL; Andalus 
WIIIIAMS, SHERRY, Opp Al 
Will IAMS UNA; Eufaula M 

WILLIAMS. w Al tir Mobile Al 
WILLIS, anii \ Mobile Al 

WILSON, CHARlls m, \[ 

WILSON WILLIAM Mobile Al 
WIMBLE) KliTH Millry, Al 
WINBORNI RAYMOND Lear) GA 
WINDHAM IOHN rroj Al 
WINGARD i\( Qi h>n Mathews ai 

WISMIR SHARON Opp Al 

WOLF WILLIAM Naples Fl 
WOMACK \NTHON\ Frisco City, Al 
WOOD BRANTLEY; Dothan Al 
wool) nam \ Greenville, Al 
WOODARD CHRISTA Birmingham 
WOOLARD BARBARA Homestead, Fl 
WRic.m |AMES PensacoU H 



Wl TURK h DAVID c 
WYAT1 HR 1 * an Savanal 
WYNAN1 rHERESA Orlando H 

w>nn nun Hayside \ a 
WYROSDK K sti\i k nston Al 
V \N( n T ammii Leno> 
MllDiM. iunni n Smiths Al 



Fl 



.'(UK mhonii Robemdale, al 
/ORn FLORA Labdle n 



Junior-. 121 



SENIORS 




ABERCROMBIE, ALLISON; Louisville, AL 

ADAMS, AMY; Ozark, AL 

ADAMS, ELIZABETH; Blountsville, AL 

ADAMS, JAMES; Brewton, AL 

ADAMS, JON; Troy, AL 

ADAMS, RACHEL; Troy, AL 

AGEE, LISA; Andalusia, AL 

ALBURY, JACE; Troy, AL 

ALESSANDRONI, MARK; York, PA 

ALFORD, JESSE; Crestview, FL 

AMAN, DIANE; Troy, AL 

AMOS, CLIFFORD; Thomasville, AL 

ANDREW, BARRY; Brewton, AL 

ANGLIN, JOHN; Dothan, AL 

ANTHONY, CHERYL; Brundidge, AL 

APLIN, DONALD; Crestview, FL 

ARCHIE, CHARLES; Opp, AL 

ARNOLD, PAULA; Troy, AL 

ASHBY, MARSHALL; Troy, AL 

ASHMORE, WINFORD; Opelika, AL 

ASMUSSEN, TINA; Ft. Peirce, FL 

ATKINS, TONY; Eufaula, AL 

AUBREY, LYNNE; Troy, AL 

AVERETT, STEPHANIE; Daleville, AL 

AVERY, DIANA; Ft. Meade, FL 

BAILEY, CHRIS; Frisco City, AL 

BAKER, GINGER; Glenwood, AL 

BAKER, JOY; Decatur, GA 

BAKER, KEITH; Panama City, FL 

BAKER, REBECCA; Chipley, FL 

BAKER, RICHARD; Chipley, FL 

BAKER, TRAC1; Indialantic, FL 

BALDUCCI, LYNETTE; Sarasota, FL 

BANKSTON, MORRIS; Ozark, AL 

BARB, JAN; Troy, AL 

BARNETTE, EVERETT; Fairhope, AL 

BARROW, JAMES; Milton, FL 

BARTON, CHRISTINE; Rockledge, FL 

BARTON, KENNETH; Troy, AL 

BARTON, SHARON; Troy, AL 

BEASLEY, MARY; Troy, AL 

BECK, RONALD; Phenix City, AL 

BECK, TERESA; Lapine, AL 

BEDSOLE, DANNY; Kinston, AL 

BELL, ANNEMARIE; Florence, AL 

BELL, DAVID; Pensacola, FL 

BELL, DEBORAH; Brewton, AL 

BENEFIELD, LAURA; Graceville, FL 

BENNETT, IRENE; Miami, FL 

BENNETT, LESLIE; Miami, FL 

BESTE, CARA; Andalusia, AL 

BHALLY, IMRAN; Sind, Pakistan 

BIEGLER, MATTHEW; Titusville, FL 

BIRKS, JENNIFER; Seminole, AL 

BIRMINGHAM, WENDY; Wetumpka, AL 

BLACK, MIKE; Phenix City, AL 

BLACKMON, GLADYS; Montgomery, AL 

BLACKMON, BRYANT; Dothan, AL 

BLACKMON, GLENDA; Luverne, AL 

BLAIR, DONALD; Troy, AL 

BLALOCK, DAN; Abbeville, AL 

BLAND, LARRY; Troy, AL 

BLANKENSHIP; Millbrook, AL 




nwn 








122 Seniors 












BLEVINS, IOSEPH; s,-lma. AL 

mow DARYI Lakeland n 

BODIFORD, DAVID Mi ■ AL 

BODIIORI) sHIRRV Mi 

BOGG s. ( HARLESj w ntei Park, H 

BOI \nov Mil ISA; Miami, FL 

BOI EV* \RI -vmi -v. Montgon ery, M 

BOSTK K, rODD Enterprise M 

BOL Inoion MIT< Hill I' il 

BOL [Will LISA Troy, AL 

BOWES, REBECCA, Lakeland, FL 

BOYD, BOBBY; Troy, M 

BOYD, SAMI II Opp, AL 

BOYi I I KONMi ition, M 

BOWDoin SAMI EL; Durant Fl 
BRADFORD, IONATHAN; Sylacauga, \i 
BRANNON, KIM Donaldsonville. GA 
BRANTLEY, jo *NNA rroy M 
BRASWELL, JEANNIE; Birmingham, AL 
BRECK, KENNY; Bonifay, FL 
BRENNAN |OHN I Irfton, s) 

BREWSTER, JULIE; Dothan, M 
BRODERICK, P\TRI< k Pi ... htn ■ 
BRODERICK, PEYTON; Peach* CA 

BROOKS Ki KKY Smiths M 
BROOKS \()RRI\ Smiths M 

BROOKS SANDR v l riah, M 
BROWS CHRISTPHER; Mhens, GA 

BROWN. MYRA; O/ark. AL 
BROWN, STEPHANAS; Dothan M 
brown riMOTHY; I It).. M 
BR\ \ni GREGORY; Troy 
BUEHLI R BRl CE; Sarasota, FL 
BUFF, SCOTT; Marietta, GA 
BULLARD. GEORGE Nassau, Bahamas 

BULLOCK, DOUGLAS; Belles u«\ Ml 
BURKs ROSI MARY; Enl M 

BURKI TT |ANA New Brockton M 
BURDi 11 IINNIfiR, Florala. M 

BURMAN, BRIDGET Venice, H 
BLRRill WARREN lad 
BUSH, PHILIP; tadalusia 

BUSH. MIC HAEL; O/ark M 
BYRD SHI ll \ rroy M 
( vLDWELI CRYSTAI Elba 

( \nnon G \rk\ Andalusia M 
( \PRARA BR m>i n :■ . M 

( \ski\ mirri n • 

( \ss\d , i iiKinN Pace n 

CATRETI PAYTON 

c mki it iiioM \s rroy M 

( \KilR BRENDA ruskegee M 

( \KHR DEBOR \H \i 

I \riir KEITH Oaari M 

i \K1IK LATANYA Be* 

( \K1IK ROBIR1 M 

( \RTIR rHERESA I nt< •; •• te M 

( \MOK IIMM1 N M 

( HAMBERS IOK! N M 

CHANCI WALTER S 

( HAPMAN SIDNEY 

i HILDREI IENNIFI • U 

( Hlll)s K mmirini froy M 



- J 2 3 



CHRISTENSEN, RAEANN; Elberta, A 

CHAPPELL, ANITA; Enterprise, A 

CHAPPELL, JAMES; Dothan, A 

CLARK, BRYAN; Opp, A 

CLARK, DAWN; Largo, F 

CLARK, HENRY; Elba, A 

CLARK, STACEY; Milton, F 

CLARKE, THOMAS; Enterprise, A 

CLEMMONS, LISA; Chancellor, A 

CLICKNER, DAVID; Columbus, CA 

CLIKAS, CARRIE; Marianna, F 

CLOUD, BRENDA; Tuskegee, A 

CLOUD, LAWRENCE; Bonifay, F 

COATES, ANNA; Bonifay, F 

COATES, KENDALL; Eufaula, A 

COBB, HARRY; Evergreen, A 

COLQUETT, TRACY; Opp, A 

COMPTON, DEBRA; Brantley, A 

CONRAD, LARS; North Coast, West German 

CONNER, LLOYD; Troy, A 

COOK, CHARLES; Union Springs, A 

COOPER, DIANA; Enterprise, A 

COPES, MATTIE; Enterprise, A 

COUNCIL, SHARION; Daleville, A 

COURSON, RUSSEL; Phenix City, A 

COX, BOBBY; Ashford, A 

CRENSHAW, DEMETRA; Greenville, A 

CREW, LINDA; Enterprise, A 

CRIM, GRETCHEN; Alabaste, A 

CRISP, LAWRENCE; Troy, A 

CROSBY, MONICA; Brewton, A 

CROSBY, SCOTT; Ozark, A 

CROW, CATHERINE; Montgomery, A 

CRUTCHFIELD, SANDRA; Sandford, F 

CULVERHOUSE, JIMMY; Enterprise, A 

CURTIS, SAMUEL; Troy, A 

CURVIN, TIMOTHY; Okeeohobee, F 

DAUGHTRY, JENNIFER; Dothan, A 

DAUGHERTY, LEE; Crestview, F 

DAVENPORT, JAMES; Jemison, A 

DAVIS, ANISA; Montgomery, A 

DAVIS, BRIAN; Pace, F 

DAVIS, DAVID; Troy, A 

DAVIS, DONNA; Eclectic, A 

DAVIS, DORIS; Andalusia, A 

DAVIS, STANLEY; Troy, A 

DAVIS, STEPHANIE; Florala, A 

DAVISON, DEBORAH; Fort Deposit, A 

DAVIDSON, KAREN; Ft. Rucker, A 

DEAN, JOHN; Dothan, A 

DECKER, SHERRI; Margate, F 

DEE, HELEN; Opp, A 

DENNIS, FRANCI; Enterprise, A 

DENNIS, NAKITHIA; Prichard, A 

DENNY, CATHRYN; Troy, A 

DENSON, JAMES; Eufaula, A 

DERAMUS, PAMELA; Troy, A 

DESMOND, KIM; Warrior, A 

DEWD, JACKSON; Atmore, A 

DAWAR, BRENTON; Largo, F 

DEWBERRY, ALETA; Spanish Fort, A 

DECESARE, FRANK; Lakeland, F 

DIX, THOMAS; Troy, A 

DIXON, ANDREA; Jensen Beach, F 

DIXON, TITUS; Clewiston, F 

DOBBS, CARLA; Birmingham, A 

DONALDSON, ANTHONY; Samson, A 

DORELL, DORSEY; Demopolis, A 

DOSS, JAMES; Bessemer, A 

DOTHARD, GEORGE; Jacksonville, A 




f £ lm*E® 



124 Seniors 



GRANT 




DO>ll. VIRGINIA; |>0) \l 
DRIGGERS, ]l AS. HI,.,, AL 
DUKI. SHELIA I I M 

in KK. MADELI . tbbeville, M 
DYBAI K, I INDA; Enterprise M 
DYI MK HAEL; lallahassee m 
DYESS, ki 5SELL; Enterprise Ai 

DYESS, WILLIAM; Elba. AL 

DYKES, LINDA; Ozark, AL 

EA51 km hi Banks, M 

I \s I in. Jin , Huntsville, m 

t Mov sum. N Kingston, Ri 

EDELBERC, KATHARINEM; Montfcdlo, GA 

EDENFIELD, KENhft Can LA 

EDWARDS \NGIE; Abbrsillc M 

EDV\ \rds mk HAEL; rroy, AL 

\[)\\ \RDV rHOMAS Troy, AL 

EFORD, M , Louisville M 

ELLIS, -\mv Elba, AL 

111 is, MARK; Brundidge, AL 

ELLIS, STEPHEN; Brundidge AL 

ELLIS, IONI-V Troy, AL 
ELLISON, BEVERLY; Elba, M 
ELMORE, GARN . I ighl Mile, AL 
isiinger, JULIE; Sarasota, n 

l\ \NS. \\(,H \ s,.|ma, AL 
FAISON, SHAWN; Dothan, AL 
FALKENBLRRV WIILIAM; Trov AI 

FARABEE, LITTA; Andalusia, Al 
FAI IK BRENDA; Dothan, Al 
FEATHERINGILL, LORI; Sebring, FL 
FEITSMA l M RINDA; Chiple) Fl 
FERGUSON, GLORI. Enterprise, AL 
FERRY. DAYNAj Exeter, NH 
FINDLATER, |OHV Phemv City, AL 

FLETCHER, ALFRED; Indiantown, FL 

FLOYD, CARLA; Trcn Al 

FLOYD, ROBERT; Tro\, AL 

FLUITT, IRA; Miami f I 

FORTHMAN, MAUREEN; Cape Canaveral, FL 

l OX, MARGARI I Brantley Al 

FOX, ROBERT; Mt. Dora H 

FRANCIS, DALTON; EnterpriM 

FR \NCIS, DOUGLAS; Gainesville, FL 
IRA/IER, LEON Enterprise ai 
(RINC "II MAY; Dothan 
f RITH, ROBIRT Planters ille Al 

FROST. BARRN Elberta, AL 

FULLER KINBIRn Elba Al 

FULLER, PEBLEY . Defunial Springs FI 
\G SMBLI MICHELLE; Dothan Al 
GARRI 1 1 MAR< I S 1" 
GAI 1M^ SON\ \ Opp M 
GIBSON phii lip lemisori M 
GILBIRi ( amiron Tro) M 
GIIBIRT. GLOR> i ay) *1 Al 

GILDIR ( HARLES Entt rprise M 
GILGRisi rODD C4en Eltyn n 

(.11 in f'HIIHP, Dothan Al 

GILLIS < HARI (s Montgomery M 

Q M)[)IN I'M 1 A Birmingham. Al 

(,i \ss ( in) ELIZABETH Louisville Al 
GLOWR M\R> Eufaula M 

CORD AN IINNIMR Montgomery At 
(,()l)s|> ROBERT. Killen Al 
GODWIN kimn Gene* 
GOODnu.hi konnii Hartford ai 
GOODWIN kristv rallahassee n 
(,ori kimhirm Montgomery m 
GR vni iik.m Ozark ai 



Seniors 125 



GRANT 



GRANT, MARY; Bascom, FL 

GREEN, EMILY; Troy, AL 

GREEN, JAMES; Culloden, GA 

GREEN, WILLIAM; Billingsley, AL 

GREEN, MARJORIE; Selma, AL 

GREGORY, LAURA; Troy, AL 

GRESSEL, MARK; Tallahassee, FL 

GRICE, JOHN; Troy, AL 

GRIFFITH, DENNIS; Opp, AL 

GRIFFITH, GINGER; Gadsden, AL 

GRIGGS, IANTHIA; Montgomery, AL 

GRISSETT, LINDA; Gadsden, AL 

GUNN, MARY; Thomasville, AL 

GUNTER, DONNA; Troy, AL 

HADLEY, JOSEPH; Enterprise, AL 

HALE, TRINA; Goshen, AL 

HALL, DARRYL; Union Springs, AL 

HALL, DEBRA; Opp, AL 

HALL, JAMES; Brantley, AL 

HALL, LOVIE; Freeport, FL 

HALL, PATRICK; Ponce de Leon, FL 

HALL, RICHIE; Mariana, FL 

HALL, TAMMY; West Palm Beach, FL 

HARRELL, ANDY; Enterprise, AL 

HARRELL, SONYA; Atmore, AL 

HARRINGTON, DWAYNE; Troy, AL 

HARRIS, AL; Montgomery, AL 

HARRIS, CELESTE; Brewton, AL 





7fatibw<t CfdtA #, TftUUtm 



Bart Wigginton has a 
dream to become a foreign 
missionary on a college cam- 
pus. His dream came true, if 
only for a short time, when 
he went to Thailand as a sum- 
mer missionary June 5 
through August 8, 1988. Bart 
and eight other TSU students 
joined with several other 
college teams to be a part of 
The Cross Cultural Project 
sponsored by Campus Cru- 
sade for Christ. 

During their stay in Thai- 
land these students actively 
shared the gospel with Thai 
students on several major 
university campuses. Not 
only was the trip a missionary 
project but also a training 
project for the stu- 
dents."The trip encouraged 
me in my walk with the 
Lord," Wigginton said. 

Buddhism is the major reli- 



gion in Thailand with 95% of 
the country's people being 
followers. Bart and the other 
students were exposed to 
Thai culture and Buddhist 
viewpoint. Even though the 
Thais have very strict cus- 
toms and dress very moder- 
ately, "They are slowly show- 
ing skin," comments Wiggin- 
ton 

Wigginton, 23, is from 
Leeds, Alabama. Upon 
graduation from TSU, Bart 
will work toward making his 
dream become a reality by 
using the training he re- 
ceived in Thailand. 

The other TSU students 
that went on the Thailand 
trip were: Eric Anderson, 
Sam Bowdoin, Stacey Clark, 
Cathy Crow, George Doth- 
ard, Denise Hill, Michael Lee, 
and Charles Windham. 



126 Seniors 






j&dk 





nnmn 








HARRIS I \s|\|)\ Vinson, AL 

Harris SAMI II rroj M 
HARRIS, MHRRV Alma, CA 

m-\k r, EUGENE; Louisville, AL 
HARTLEY, lit IRI I Al 

HARVEY, KlMBIRi Y;Tusl ai 

HAT< HER, IRAQ I' R n ker, ai 

HAYls RHONDA; rroj M 
HAYIs rHERESA Fl Rucker, AL 
HI AD |AMES; Andalusia, AL 
HEATHON, I ISA; Pensacola, FL 
HERBERT, HI CH rroy, ai 
HICK, CHARLES; Ft. Campbell, K<i 
HENBY, DONALD • MS 

HENDRK ks, BART; lay, FL 
HENDRK ks rEENA; lay, n 
hinrv BRIAN; Hawkunsville, CA 

HERNANDEZ, JORU Wo,, AL 
Hf ndirson ( YNTHIA; rroj Al 
HENRY, LOI IS; Plttsb irg PA 
HETZEL, BERNADE; Inverse, FL 

HIBBARD, WILLIAM; Satellite Bch, FL 
hicks riNA; Montgomery, AL 
HICDON, KEITH; P.nnsacola, FL 
HILL, JFNNIFFR; Birmingham, AL 
HILL, TAMMY; Ozark, AL 
HINES, DEBORAH; Eufaula, AL 
HIPSHER, AMY; Marietta, CA 

HOBBS, BETTY; Andalusia, AL 
HOBBS, LISA; Troy, AL 
HOLLINCSWORTH, DARON. iutaula, AL 
HOLLON, KIMBERLY; Grad>, AL 
HOI MAN DONNA, Pensacola, Al 
HOLMES, JEFFERY; Trov, AL 
HOLMES, PHILIP; Brewton, AL 

HONL'iCLTT, MARTINA, Birmingham AL 
HOUGH, SCOTT; Orlando, FL 
HOWARD, TRACI; Chunchula, AL 
HIBBARD. BRN AN; Chatom. Al 
HUDLH DANIEL; BrundidRe. AL 
HUDSON, GERALD; Dothan. AL 
HUDSON, REGINA; Elba Al 

HUDSON, ROBERT; Opp, AL 
HUGHES, JAMES; Ariton. AL 
HUGHES, LYNDA; Ireland 
HUGHEY, EDWARD; Selma, AL 
HUNT CHRMOPHER; Enterprise Al 
HUNT. IAN, Washington, DC 
HUTCHINSON DARIEM Elba AL 

HYATT VICKI; Trov Al 
INGRAM, SHERRI; Davenport Fl 

IRVIN KIMBERLY Lakeland, FL 
ISAAC, LYNDON Yulee, FL 
IVE\ BARR\ Shitel 
IVEY, ROBERT. Richland Al 
|V\ DONNA Hope Hull, AL 

I AC KsO\ BRINDA Trov Al 

|A< KSON DEBR \ Opp Al 
|A< KSON HOPS s tdI k,- ii 

Jackson martha cienwood, ai 

JACOBS mickh Brundidge Al 
I S< OBS T ami Kinstoi 

LAMES IINNIHR M TS 

I amis mk HAEI Way< 
IAMES pamii a Weft 
H ssi vi( K1 Daleville ai 
JINRIGHI ( MtRII rroj ai 
IOHNSON ( YNTHI Ft Walton Bch FL 
JOHNSON DAVID rroj 
johnson doi a \s r, nsacola, fl 



Senior? 127 



JOHNSON, VANESSA; Brundidge, AL 

JOHNSON, JEFFERY; Troy, AL 

JOHNSON, JENNIFER; Andalusia, AL 

JOHNSON, JOHNNY; Dothan, AL 

JOHNSON, JONATHAN; Troy, AL 

JOHNSON, KARLA; Troy, AL 

JOHNSON, LASHAW; TROY, AL 

JOHNSON, LESIE; Troy, AL 

JOHNSON, LINDA; Atmore, AL 

JOHNSON, MICHAEL; Eufaula, AL 

JOHNSON, PAUL; Headland, AL 

JOHNSON, RACHEL; Coden, AL 

JOHNSON, TODD; Brantley, AL 

JOHNSON, PAUL; Atlanta, GA 

JONES, JANET; Freeport, FL 

JONES, JEFFREY; Tampa, FL 

JONES, JOHN; Goshen, AL 

JONES, MICHAEL; Selma, AL 

JONES, MARCIA; Tuskeegee, AL 

JONES, MARK; Enterprise, AL 

JONES, RENECER; Mobile, AL 

JONES, WILLIAM; Troy, AL 

JORDAN, GEORGE; Montgomery, AL 

KANTOR, GRETA; Troy, AL 

KELLY, BERTRAM; Franklin, GA 

KELLY, GARY; Elba, AL 

KELLY, KIMBERLY; Butte, MT 

KELLY, KIMBERLY; Midland City, AL 

KELLY, MARY; Samson, AL 

KELLY, MICHAEL; Troy, AL 

KENNEDY, BARBARA; Troy, AL 

KENNEDY, PATRA; Clayton, AL 

KERSEY, PAMELA; Phoenix City, AL 

KILGORE, KIRK; Dothan, AL 

KIMBROUGH, MICHAEL; Notasulga, AL 

KIRKLAND, BRETT; Headland, AL 

KLANG, JAMES; Enterprise, AL 

KLAVA, GLENN; DeFuniak Springs, AL 

KNIGHT, KENNETH; Blakely, GA 

KNIGHT, RODERICK; Birmingham, AL 

KNIGHT, SCOTT; Opp, AL 

KOZIOL, JAY; Mount Prospect, IL 

KRANZ, SHARON; Troy, AL 

KUNTZ, JAN; Seminole, FL 

KVALSUND, RONALD; Troy, AL 

LAMBERT, MICHAEL; Troy, AL 

LAMPLEY, SABRINA; Brundidge, AL 

LANE, STEVEN; Brewton, AL 

LANGFORD, ROBERT; Notasulga, AL 

LAROCHE, KELLY; Crestview, FL 

LARSON, JAMES; Andalusia, AL 

LAVENDER, JAMES; Troy, AL 

LEDBETTER, MICHAEL; Troy, AL 

LEHMANN, KELLY; Atmore, AL 

LEVERETTE, LAURA; Brundidge, AL 

LEWIS, MARY; Andalusia, AL 

LEWIS, MITCHELL; Brewton, AL 

LEWIS, VANESSA; Forest Home, AL 

LEWIS, WADE; Dothan, AL 

LINDER, JEFF; Geneva, AL 

LINTON, MARY; Goshen, AL 

LONG, JEFFREY; Florala, AL 

LOTT, JANET; Troy, AL 

LOUIS, PETER; Ipoh, Perek 

LOWE, PEGGY; Honoraville, AL 

LOWREY, DONALD; Zephyrhills, FL 

LOWREY, PAULA; Frisco City, AL 

LUNN, DALE; Troy, AL 

LUX, EDWARD; Spartanburg, SC 

MCBRYDE, FREDERICK; Troy, AL 




m*l M e, l 




128 Seniors 




fllfii^ 




\1( ( Mtikfv si SAN; Birmingham, AL 
M< < ML, BEVERLY; Elba, M 
M< < mi Kisv Fit; i IA 

m< ( Ml K>\-v Millbrook, AL 
M< CARTHA, JO ANN AL 

MCCARlnv ELIZABI ih. Brundid] 
MCCLUNG, UII1I If 

M< ( RIMON, w r\NDA; Vincent, m 

M< ( OLLOUGH RHI I I Elba, AL 
MCCOV IONATHAN; Lanetl m 
MCCRW REGINALD; lacksonville, fl 
M< ( RORY, I LINT; Panama I '. n 
MCCROR'i |A< KIE; Troy, FL 
MCCRORY, KIM; Brewton, AL 

mcdamiis KAREN; Stoi kbridge, CA 

MCDONMD. Illf -\NV In . 
MCDOWELL, CALMS. Tus< jloosa. AL 
MCFATTER, JILL, Bomtdv, FL 
MCGINTY, LESLII. Walnut Hill, FL 
MCKEE, MICHAEL; Opelika, AL 
MCKINNEY, PAMELA; Ozark, AL 

MCKNIGHT, ANITA; Newton, M 

MCLINDON. SHIRLEY; Clia, AL 
MCLEOD, RITM Luverne M 
MCLEROY, ( HRISTINA; Pace H 
MCMILLIAN, JACKIE; Repton M 
MCOHERSON MIK Hfll B.jirtcc, AL 
MACK, DEBORAH, Linden. AL 

MADDEN, KARMEN; Kissimmee, FL 
MADDOX, DAVID; Brewton, AL 
MADDOX, JAMES, Elva, AL 
MADDOX, KELVIN; Columbia, AL 
MADDOX, WILLIAM; Columbia, AL 
MADISON, PATRICIA, Luverne, M 
MALISHAM, PATRICIA; Greenville M 

M -\Nl V 1IR W( ! . Montgomery. AL 
MARAMAN, HERBERT; Georgunj M 
MARAMAN, HUBERT; Georgiana M 
MARINO, TINA; Ft Myers Fl 

M-\RKFRT r\MY; New Port Ridley, Fl 
MARKS K\RIN rroy, AL 
MARLOWI \NITV Tros M 

MARTIN. NATHANIEL; Luverne. M 
MASSFN I-wimi Blountsvillc M 
MATHFWs BRl CE; Honoraville, AL 
MATHIIl MARIANNI V. -cross, GA 
MAXWELI WILLIAM Brewton M 
MAYFIELD. VINCI NT sh.ilim.n II 
MAYS, BRENDA; Troy M 

MEACHAM -\MY. Dothan M 
MEDLEY, IONATHAN Brundidge M 
MEDLEY sin \mi Jacksonville, FL 

Mil TON TR \( > Fl ■ M 

MEREDITH TIMOTHY in!<-t ; .i se M 
MERKERSON mi\ko\ Wetumpka, AL 
MEILLEUR RON Troj M 

MFssK K WW l.i- \.w;jv N\ 

M|ss|( K LORI Opp M 

Ml MR C RAIG C assdbeiT) Fl 

MEYER IlilRn \\ Melbourne, H 

\ik me kmis \ i FS es, Al 

MIKEI |A> Opp M 

mkios MARK Seminole H 

MILLER KIMBERL\ Donabonville 

MIIMR MARK I 1 

MILLER PATRK k ( nk M 

misc n mii ISSA Palm b<-.h h n 

nunc I 'i MERIANNI requesta fl 

MIT< Hill BRIAN H 

mitc hiii <. \koi Mathewj 



s i;q 



MITCHELL 



MITCHELL, MATTHEW; Eufaula, 

MITCHELL, KRAIG; Troy, 

MIXON, JAMES; St. Petersburg 

MOON, JEFFREY; Daleville, 

MOONEY, LAURA; Excel, 

MOONEY, NATHAN; Selma, 

MOORE, FREDA; Laurel Hill 

MOORE, JUANITA; Andalusia, 

MOORE, OLA; Bessemer, 

MOORE, WILLIAM; San Angelo, 

MORGAN, CHRISTOPHER; Troy, 

MORGAN, JOE; Enterprise, 

MORROW, DORSEY; Montgomery, 

MORROW, KATHERINE; Ft. Rucker, 

MORROW, NELSON; Elba, 

MOSS, MARY; Satellite Beach, 

MOTLEY, EVA; Pensacola, 

MOULTON, ELIZABETH; Opp, 

MOULTRIE, SANDRA; Orlando 

MOULTRY, CYNTHIA; Highland Home, 

MOUNT, DARYL; Brantley, 

MURDEN, TAMMY; Bfloxi, 

MURDOCK, JAMES; Gadsden, 

MURRAY, CORNELIUS; Murfreesboro, 

MURRAY, DEBORAH; Elba, 

MURRAY, JOSEPH; Ozark, 

MUSICK, MICAHEL; Midland City, 

MYERS, CLARK; Huntsville, 



NEAL, TODD; Troy, AL 

NELSON, AUDREY; Gadsden, AL 

NELSON, CYNTHIA; Elba, AL 

NELSON, REGINA; Fairhope, AL 



NEWTON, KIMBERLY; Thomasville, AL 

NORDMEYER, MARGO; Brewton, AL 

NORRIS, CHARLES; Troy, AL 

NORSTROM, JAY; Jackson, AL 



NORSWORTHY, MARILYN; Glenwood, AL 

NORTON, LISA; Troy, AL 

NORTON, VIRGIL; Troy, AL 

OGDEN, LESLEY; Lake City, FL 



OHMAN, VALERIE; Dothan, AL 

OROURKE, WILLIAM; Troy, AL 

OVERTON, DELIA; Dothan, AL 

OWENS, ANGELA; Andalusia, AL 



OWENS, GREGORY; Opp, AL 

PADGETT, JOHN; Chipley, FL 

PADGETT, MELINDA; Evergreen, AL 

PARAMORE, BETHANY; Ariton, AL 



PARAMORE, BRADLEY; Newton, AL 

PARAMORE, MARCUS; Troy, AL 

PARHAM, MICHAEL; Troy, AL 

PARISH, JOSEPH; Clayton, AL 




130 Seniors 



1 




PARMR HKISI) \ M 

PARKER, H I J N 

PARMR KATHRYN; < <«<m Be* h, H 

PARKER PATRICM fti 

PANACI *S DANIELLI Dothui AL 

PARRISH, 5TEV an Moi Al 

PARshmi WILLIAM; Pi i, Fl 

PATfL, RITA, Tro>. Al 
PATTERSON M \\ IIR MoniKom. 
PAXTON I'lNM lupiter, Fl 
PAYSI, JIM\1- .ilk-, AL 

PI \( ()( K, ancii V Hartford, AL 

PERR<tMAN IR AN< Al 

PI MRS, RHONDA BrundidKc AL 
PETERSON rODD I 
PI I HI I IOANNA • AL 

PHELPS, MIKE, Tro. Al 
PHILLIPS ERNESTINI Ozart M 
PHILLIPS. SHIRLEY; Montgomery AL 
PIAZZA, VIRGINIA, Birmingham, AL 
PIMIENTA, GARRICK. Tampd. EL 
PIPPINS, MARY, Slocombe, AL 
PITTMan. andriw Brantley, M 
PLESS, KELVIN; Amencus. CA 
PLESLR Don. Enterprise M 
POLLARD, KELL\ Notasulga, AL 
POPE, DOUGLAS; Webb, AL 
POPE, ROBERT, Webb, AL 




&oMeye &£ tAe Stymie fceUne* 



Ben Baker, famous for his col- 
umn, "College of the Bizzare", 
is a person who is willing to 
stand up and speak out for what 
he believes is right. He is not 
afraid of critisicm or the atten- 
tion he receives. 

The idea for his column came 
from a contest co-sponsored by 
a South Florida and a Texan 
newspaper. The purpose of the 
contest was to find the largest 
cock roach. The contest came 
to the attention of Priscilla Teal, 
former editor of the Tropolitan, 
and Jim Joseph, who asked Ben 
to hold his own roach contest. 

Baker's contest was called 
"Centennial Roach Contest" 
with the Biggest Roach Award 
presented to the winner. The 
article lead to his regular col- 
umn, "College of the Bizzare' . 
In his first column he misspelled 
Bi/arre, unintentionally, and 



the misspelling has stuck. 

Ben's ideas for his column 
come from everywhere, but his 
best articles come "when he 
just sits down at the computer 
and writes, not reallv thinking 
about it first". His articles range 
from the dress code on the golf 
course to parking problems on 
campus, but he always reverts 
back to the raoches because 
that is where he got his start. 

"I write my art i< les w ith satire 
and humor, and I tr\ to look at 
life with a different view/ 4 Ba- 
ker said. 

Ben enjoys his job because 

he loves to talk and to meet 
people , but, at the same time 
he dislikes it because writing a 
column m\ oK es too muc h time 
and he runs out ot things to 
write about. 

"College of the Bizzare " ap- 
pears weekly in the Tropolitan. 



n 131 



POWELL 



POWELL, PAULA; Andalusia, AL 

POWELL, RONALD; Greenville, AL 

POWELL, TIM; Florala, AL 

POWELL, VINCE; Grove Hill, AL 

PRESTON, GUY; Tallahassee, FL 

PRESTON, JEFFREY; Ozark, AL 

PRICE, CARLA; Ariton, AL 

PRICE, DAVID; Louisville, AL 

PRICE, RAYMOND; Autaugaville, AL 

PRICE, TINA; Ozark, AL 

PUCKETT, KEN; Pensacola, FL 

PURIFOY, TANGELA; Atmore, AL 

RABREN, TONY; Andalusia, AL 

RADFORD, VIRGINIA; Troy, AL 

RAMSEY, ANGELA; Midland, AL 

RASH, KIM; Troy, AL 

REAVES, DONALD; Palmetto, GA 

REED, BERNARD; Mobile, AL 

REED, SHARON; Spanish Fort, AL 

REGISTER, TERESA; Troy, AL 

REISCH, ANGELA; Ariton, AL 

REYNOLDS, JACQUELINE; Troy, AL 

REYNOLDS, JOHN; Enterprise, AL 

REYNOLDS, SHELLIE; Defuniak Springs, FL 

RHODES, SCARLETT; Elba, AL 

RIBEIRO, ALMBITET; Andalusia, AL 

RICE, DEBBIE; Panama City, FL 

RICH, CHRIS, Bonifay, FL 

RICHARDSON, KRISTYN; Ft. Walton Beach, FL 

RICHARDSON, LANNIE; Troy, AL 

RICHARDSON, LYDIA; Ozark, AL 

RICHARDSON, MARTHA; Troy, AL 

RICHBURG, LORI; Luverne, AL 

RIDGWAY, BRIAN; Enterprise, AL 

RILEY, TERRY; Troy, AL 

RIVERS, NICKI; Camp Hill, AL 

ROBBINS, KATHY; Opp, AL 

ROBBINS, KIM; Valdosta, GA 

ROBERTS, ALLISON; Ozark, AL 

ROBERTS, HOMER; Troy, AL 

ROBERTS, JOSEPH; Eclectic, AL 

ROBERTS, VICTOR; Montgomery, AL 

ROBINSON, TONY; Campbellton, FL 

RODENBAUGH, JON; Troy, AL 

ROE, RODNEY; Pine Hill, AL 

ROLLING, RUBY; Luverne, AL 

ROOT, KATHRYN; Ozark, AL 

ROPER, MYRTLE; Honoraville, AL 

ROSHON, MICHAEL; Bonifay, FL 

ROUTZONG, ROBERT; Troy, AL 

RUMPH, GARRY; Troy, AL 

RUSSELL, THOMAS; Luverne, AL 

RUTLEDGE, RACHEL; Thomasville, AL 

RUTLEDGE, WILLIAM; Troy, AL 

RUSH, MICHELLE; Dothan, AL 

RUSSO, MARC; Glen Cove, NY 

RUDD, ALAN; Orlando, FL 

RYALS, WARREN; Wetumpka, AL 

RYAN, JODY; Orlando, FL 

SANDERS, ALAN; Andalusia, AL 

SANDERS, CHRISTOPHER; Eclectic, AL 

SANDERS, DANIEL; Troy, AL 

SANDERS, LYNN; Troy, AL 

SAUCEDA, JEFFREY; Niceville, FL 

SAVAGE, REGINALD; Montgomery, AL 

SCARBROUGH, VINCE; Clanton, AL 

SCARBROUGH, WILLIAM; Thomasville, AL 

SCHOFIELD, MELISIA; Luverne, AL 

SCHOFIELD, TAMMY; Greenville, AL 

SCOGIN, CYNTHIA; Atmore, AL 




C if Aflfl 




,^*\ ^ * *-?//,, flf 







d . (T 





w**m', 





e ~£ * ^n, 




132 Seniors 




SBLT1* o\ o ; 







SCOTT, ALICE; McK( 

s|ssio\s 5HENANDONI V IU.j. m 

si xi on BARBARA; Florala, Al 

SHARP < HRISTOPHER 

SHEPHERD ( HARI ES; O M 

SHERA RICHARD ' 

SHIRAH, IONATHAN; (,• 

SHORI S Dl BBII \<<>. M 
SHORES, LORI; Remlap, AL 

SHOWS Klkl In,. M 
SINK DELOIS fro) M 
SIKES, NAN< V Luverne, AL 
SIMPKINS W <WNI Dunnellon, H 
SKEEN ROSALINDA; P< H 

skliv STEVEN; Ozark, AL 
SKIPPER, jihirv Wintei Haven, AL 
SMALI ( HRISTOPHER; Atlanta. GA 
SMALLWOOD, LAMAR Selma, Al 
SMITH, < MMV Montgomery M 
SMITH, CHRISTOPHER; Clanion, AL 
SMITH, III \>M Dothan, M 

SMITH, LAURIE; Jacksonville 11 
SMITH MARGERI I AL 

SMITH mark Midland ai 
SMITH, MICHAEL; Andalusia M 
SMITH, PATRICK; Ormond Bch, H 
SMITH, RHENELIA; Dothan, M 
SMITH, TIMOTHY; Dothan, AL 

SMITHERMAN, kariv Montgomery Al 
SMEED, DELTR A Banks AL 
smi i DEVON Fairhope, W 
SOMERFORD, DEBRA; Midland Oty, AL 
SPANN Rl< HARD l"ro) M 
SPEAKMAS SONYA Montgomery Al 
SPEN< IK ( YNTHIA Beatrice Al 

SPIKES, TERESA: Geneva, Al 
SPIVEl KIMS. Louisville ai 
SPURUN SKIPPER Opp M 
SPURLIV riNA; Opp Al 
STABLER. KATHLEEN Greenville, Al 
STANLEY, IANEEN; I ;itaula, AL 
STARKS, CYSTHIA; Brundidpr Al 

STEPHiss PAl i iroy M 
STEPHENS S< OTI Dothan M 
STEW ART ( IND\ Tr<n M 
STEWAR1 m \k"> Brundidge, M 
STEW ART. ROBERT Ir,n \l 
slOKin LINDA Millr) M 
STONI IOANNI ( hiple) Fl 

sTORn MARK Elba ai 
STOR\ SI S VN Panama Cit\. H 

STOI GH \nm i ii Red Level, al 
STOUGH MARTHA Lapine Al 
STRINGFEU.OW MARK GuH Breeze H 
STROl SI rR u 1 Lakeland n 
SULLIV a\ DEBORAH Elba M 

SULLI\ KH |OHN East Is! p Kh 
si ni\ \\ PHllliP F Al 

s\\i u yvONNI Lake Wales Fl 
I \hh HAROLD Midal a i M 
TABLER |EFFRE\ Dalev i 
! \K\lK DEBOR \ Midwaj AL 
I \YLOR DAVII • n 

rAYLOR FREDDII Ozark M 

1 AMOK I ISA I* I 
THIERFELDER DANA Honorav k 
H-IOM \S ( MHlKiM Brantle) ai 
IXOMAS KURT; Mi . At 

IXOMAS LAURENCI Eufaula, Al 
mOMAS Mil AMI M« Al 



Seniors l ' ' 



THOMAS 



THOMAS, ZANETTA; Troy, AL 

THOMPSON, CARRIE; Troy, AL 

THOMPSON, CHERYL; Louisville, AL 

THOMPSON, FRANCIS; Andalusia, AL 

THOMPSON, MELONI; Jonesboro, GL 

THOMPSON, SALLY; Andalusia, AL 

THOMPSON, SHARON; Troy, AL 

THOMPSON, STACEY; Troy, AL 

THORNTON, LISA; Andalusia, AL 

THURLOW, KELLY; Chancellor, AL 

TILLIS, JOHN; Cairo, GA 

TODD, MICHAEL; Winter Haven, FL 

TOMLIN, HUGH; Troy, AL 

TOMLIN, TAMALA; Ozark, AL 

TOMPKINS, GEORGE; Ramer, AL 

TRAVIS, JERALD; Cantonment, FL 

TRUETT, JAMES; Skipperville, AL 

TUCKER, ANDREA; Mobile, AL 

TUFARIELLO, DANIEL; Fort Myers, FL 

TURDO, MIKE; Palm Springs, FL 

TURK, MICHAEL; Lynn Haven, FL 

TYLER, CARLOS; Prichard, AL 

VANDAGRIFF, SANDRA; Dothan, AL 

VANSANDT, MARK; Troy, AL 

VAUGHAN, LUKE; Jacksonville, FL 

VAUGHAN, MARIBETH; Cape Coral, FL 

VICK, JANET; Enterprise, AL 

VINES, STUART; Birmingham, AL 

VOYLES, LORI; Sasrasota, FL 

WACHOB, PENNY; Dothan, AL 

WAGNER, KENNETH; Pembroke Pines, FL 

WALDEN, HANS; Ozark, AL 

WALDREP, STACY; Anniston, AL 

WALKER, MARY BETH; Andalusia, AL 

WALLACE, JAMES; Lowell, AR 

WALLACE, KEITH; Prattville, AL 

WALLER, JAMES; Greenville, AL 

WARD, CODY; Andalusia, AL 

WATERS, JULIE; Banks, AL 

WATFORD, JENNIFER; Webb, AL 

WATSON, ANGELA; Dozier, AL 

WATSON, DONNA; Greenville, AL 

WATSON, LANA; Clayton, AL 

WEAVER, JAMES; Brewton, AL 

WEAVER, PHILLIP; Troy, AL 

WEAVER, RODNEY; Troy, AL 

WEBB, WILLIAM; Montgomery, AL 

WEEKS, BRIAN; Kinston, AL 

WEEKS, DOUGLAS; Opp, AL 

WEEKS, LLOYD; Florala, AL 

WELCH, DOUGLAS; Brewton, AL 

WELLS, KAROL; Stowe, VT 

WESTBROOK, LAURA; Louisville, AL 

WHALEY, ELLEN; Huntsville, AL 

WHEELER, RHONDA; Andalusia, AL 

WHIDDON, MARY; Headland, AL 

WHISONAT, CHARLES; Opp, AL 

WHITAKER, YVONNE; Grady, AL 

WHITE, BETHANY; Grand Ridge, FL 

WHITE, BARBARA; New Brockton, AL 

WHITE, CHRISTY; Troy, AL 

WHITE, ELLA; Troy, AL 

WHITE, JOE; Clearwater, FL 

WHITE, LARHONDA; Marianna, FL 

WHITE, RAY; Marianna, FL 

WHITE, THOMAS; Atmore, AL 

WICKLINE, KIMBERLY; Troy, AL 

WILKERSON, KELLY; Troy, AL 

WILKES, WILLIAM; Troy, AL 

WILLIAMS, BILLY; Enterprise, AL 












134 Seniors 




I I 



flunfn«/jp 




& £ W °Q~ 





* A rt 



\ ' 



Will l -\ms BOBBY; Alma, CA 

Will IAMS < wiih'< IN Fl 

win IAMS < YNTHIA; Leroy ai 

WHENDERSON ' YNTHIA; if.-. AL 

Will IAMS DAVID I >■ ■• M 

Wll l IAMS IKK . Moi ' M 

win IAMS, IODII I M 

WILLIAMS, |U l\ i ■ AL 

Wll I IAMS winiiriu Moi M 

wii l IAMSON |OHN Mn ori 

will IS, GREG; Wei M 

WILLOl (.inn SI SAN Anion, AL 

wii son \mii n AL 

Wll son ( HARLES; U>beville ai 

Wll son DEIDRI 

WILSON KELLY; Opp, AL 

Wll son kk HARD 

WINDHAM CHARLES Robertsdale, AI 

WINDHAM WILLIAM AL 

WITHAM, ROBIRT -V : NH 

WOFFORD , WEND\ ( olumbus, GA 

won nk HOI \S rroy M 
WOOD PAM Enterprise ai 

wood i ammn i yn< hburg, \ a 
WOODARD, MK HELLE; Birmingham. AL 
WOODARD HKl - 
WOODHAM, STEPHANII O/jrk AL 
WOODS C INDI Troy. AL 

WOODS. VALIRII TtO) AI 

WOO UN. DONALD; Atmor. 

WORD, andri A Geneva M 
work ( Mhirini Jacksonville, FL 
WRK.HI GERALD 
WRIGHI MALCOLM; Elba AL 
WRIGHT, MELLISSA; Killen, AI 

WRIGHT, Ml( HAEL; Sarasota. Fl 
WRIGH1 IR \( n Ivtelboun ■ 
wnnn SON> a, Geneva, ai 
w^rk K NATALII rallal 
YOST, ELIZABI TH. lemison. AL 
H)i N(, DAVID Wi N> 

mm ng, DEBORAH, tadalusia, Al 



H)l NG MARVI s \shville, Al 
VOI NG SI SAN Eglin MB ft 
ZAP \i A DAN Brui 



- 



GRADUATES 




ANTHONY, CHARLES; Troy, A 

APPLEY, MITHCHELL; Dothan, A 

ASHTON, WILLIAM; Dothan, A 

BAKER, JEANNE; Enterprise, A 

BARNER, ROBERT; Millbrook, A 

BECK, JENNIFER; Troy, A 

BLAIR, ELAINE; Troy, A 

BRUNSON, ANGELA; Columbus, GA 

CARROLL, LINDA; Troy, A 

CASSADY, MECHELE; Andalusia, A 

CHINAKWE, CHARLES; Nigeri 

COLLVER, CATHER; Dothan, A 

CURVIN, JEFFREY; Okeechobee, F 

DAVENPORT, TERESA; Troy, A 

DICHIARA, CHERYL; Troy, A 

DUNN, GUY; Troy, A 

EDMOND, FRANCINE; Bainbridge, GA 

EDWARDS, JOHN; Troy, A 

EILAND, JOSEPH; Lapine, A 

ELMORE, SARAH; Florala, A 

ENGLISH, PATSY; Elba, A 

FAULKNER, WILLIE; Troy, A 

FINLAYSON, JOHN; Troy, A 

FOWEE, DEBORAH; Troy, A 

FUNKHOUSER, GARY; Troy, A 

GAMMAGE, FRANCES; Luverne, A 

GIDDENS, WADE; Andalusia, A 

GRAFFUNDER, DONNA; Highland Home, A 

GRAVLIN, ED; Troy, A 

GREGORY, WILLIAM; Rutledge, A 

GULLEY, MELISSA; Troy, A 

HETAH, KENNETH; Warner Robins, GA 

HOUSTON, MARIE; Eufaula, A 

JERNIGAN, SANDRA; Eufaula, A 

JOHNSTON, BETH; Troy, A 

JUDY, BRADSHAW; Troy, A 

KEETON, BRENDA; Troy, A 

KEETON, LINDA; Troy, A 

KILLIAN, SUZANNE; Troy, A 

KIMBLE, SELMA; Troy, A 

KLEINSCHMIDT, NORMAN; Coral Springs, F 

LADNER, JOHNNY; Mobile, A 

LAMBERTH, MICHAEL; Eufaula, A 

LEACH, NANCY; Birmingham, A 

LOCKETT, TINA; Troy, A 

LOWERY, WILLIAM; Troy, A 

MATHEWS, RANDY; Mobile, A 

MCGILBERRY, PHRAN; Uriah, A 

MITCHELL, JUDY; Brantley, A 

MITCHELL, SUSAN; Enterprise, A 

MOORE, ROY; Troy, A 

MORRIS, MICHAEL; Branntley, A 

MYERS, PATTI; Troy, A 

PATTERSON, CARRIE; Opp, A 

PIKE, PHILLIP; Lanett, A 

PROBANCHA, YULMAN; Rainer, OR 

RUSSELL, EVA; Lapine, A 

RYAN, PATRICIA; Troy, A 

SANDERS, SUSANNE; Brundidge, A 

SASSER, SCOTT; Troy, A 

SAUNDERS, PATICK; Dothan, A 

SENN, PATRICIA; Jack, A 

SMART, DAVID; Troy, A 




jflHH^" &w^ 




136 Graduates 




& ft 




SMAR1 I. MAkK I |i kei M 

SMITH, < HRISTOPHER I' i e \w>\<-, M 
smi m i \q\ \\ rhon ■>■ • Ik • 
si Mil INC Mi' 

SPIVEY Will 1AM; Moi • M 

si'i \ks CRECOR ■ M 

TAYLOR. CLAIRf l-o, M 

ihki mm, in |AMES rroy, AL 
riNER, < ONSTAN< I s. lfmo n. AL 
rOMBLIN Mil DKID; Columbus, GA 
M( ( M.L, TAMM> rroy 
M( DOWELI . IAMIE; Dozier, M 
WOOTIV |AMES; Milton, II 
MULlls mk l rroy, ^L 

WENDALI STEPHENS Tray, \i 

WIGGINS KOSMI I 
WILSON, IOHN; Dothan M 
WOOD, V\ -\\noi in Ozarl M 
YAMASAKI RU )l. Kodli, Japan 
YAWN LESA rroy, AL 
YOLNGBLOOD, DOROTHY; Cost 



Gradual)-- 




138 Entertainment 




Entertainment 



Troy State students had a wide range of cultural experinces to choose from during 
the year. 

The drama department presented plays that ranged from serious drama to hilar- 
ious comedies. During the Alabama Shakespeare Festival's visit theypresented their 
rendition of William Shakespeare's play Hamlet. 

The Adams Center Union Board presented TSU students with the opportunity to 
see well known groups Chicago and Cheap Trick. Also, the ACUB presented movies 
and a variety of tournaments for TSU students to partcipate in. 

The events of the year left TSU students with many exciting and lasting impres- 
sions. 







Lori Featheringill 

Section Editor 



Derek Brown 
Heath DeRamus 
Cara English 
Tim Jacobs 
Ed Moseley 
Donald Norsworthy 
Photographers 



tntertainment 139 




M^- ' ' tf# 



TROY STATE UNIVERSITY 

I MAY ? ACIJB STEP SHK 



3 MOVIE TEQUILA SUNRISE 
X) TWINS 




Top Left: Tennis is just one of the 
many sporting activities at TSU. 
Top Right: Many students become 
active in the quarterly plays per- 
formed by the drama department. 
Bottom Left: ACUB sponsors "Mov- 
ie Night" at Smith Hall every 
Wednesday night. 
Bottom Right: The Adams Center 
Game Room has ping pong tables, 
pool tables and video games for stu- 
dents' use and enjoyment. 




140 Let TSU Entertain You 



Let TSU Entertain You! 




Stop. Take a minute to 
think and remember. 
How often do you 

complain "There's nothing 

to do around here . . . I'm so 
bored,"? If you're really hon- 
est with yourself, you will 
probably realize it's fairly of- 
ten. 

Students often joke about 
TSU's slogan "Alabama's 
Most Exciting Campus", but 
in fact, it's no joke at all. Ex- 
citement, activity and oppor- 
tunity are abundant here at 
Troy State. The real joke is on 
those students who fail to 
take advantage of it. 

Troy State has something 
for everyone whether you're 
a jock, a bookworm, an ec- 
centric artist or just some- 
where in between. 

For the athletically in- 
clined, there is inter-colle- 
giate competition as well as 
intramural sports of all kinds. 
But even if you're not into 
structured sports, there is 
the pool, weightroom, and 
the tennis and basketball 
courts for you're own per- 
sonal use. 



Ok, you say you're un- 
< 001 dinated and definitel . 

not athletic What about 

joining one of the man . or - 

gani/ations that arc at live on 
campus? There arc profes- 
sional, social and honor so< i- 
ties that are great places to 
enhance and broaden your 
knowledge and to meet new 
people and have fun. Then- 
are also religious groups of all 
denominations on campus 
available to students 

Still not convinced TSU 
can keep you busy? What 
about getting involved in a 
drama production, the For- 
ensics team or one of the 
campus singing groups? 

The ACUB also sponsors 
many events on campus each 
quarter for students to par- 
ticipate in and enjoy such as 
the quarterly concerts, the 
weekly movies and the var- 
ious tournaments. 

Now, if after going 
through the above possibi- 
lites of "things to do at TSU" 
you don't find at least one 
thing to occupy your time, 
well then, you can always 
study. 



Top: Each fall and winter quarter. 
ACUB sponsors a big name cc 
like Chicago", for student enter- 
tainment 

Bottom: The pool is just one of the 
recreational tatilities on campus 
atailahle to students 



let Tsi Entertain ^<m 141 




th* imb 



<rfMR|F£ 




CAST OF CHARACTERS 

Joe TODD LIDH 

Tom WILL BLACK 

Kitty Duval GIANNA REILLY 

Nick C.J. WILSON 

Arab STACEY LAPP 

Kit Carson CHRIS RICH 

McCarthy PATRICK HALL 

Krupp KURT MCCALL 

Harry WAYNE SIMPKINS 

Wesley PHILIP MCCANLESS 

Dudley MICHAEL GOLEBIEWSKI 

Elsie KAREN HAMILTON 

Lorene Smith KELLY MACLEOD 

Mary L MARGARET WINGATE 

Willie the pinball player TROY MILLS 

Blick DANNY GILROY 

Drunk HUGH TOMLIN 

Sailor BOBBY RICE 

"Killer" DALISIA TAYLOR 

"Darlin" DORELL DORSEY 

The Society Gentleman ROBERT NEWMAN 

Other Regulars at Nick's LYNN BALDUCCI 

ALICIA DANIEL, HEATHER KATES 



142 The Time of Your Life 





The TSU Department of 
Speech and Drama, 
under the direction of 
Tom Smiley, presented Wil- 
liam Saroyan's "The Time Of 
Your Life" on January 30-31, 
1989, in Smith Hall Audito- 
rium. 

The play was written just 
before World War II. The au- 
thor saw his play as an allego- 
ry of the times. Each charac- 
ter was an interesting person 
in the play, but on a another 
level, each represented a dif- 
ferent quality of mankind 
alive in the world of 1939. 
The plot focuses on Joe, a 
wealthy patron of Nick's bar. 
Joe constantly studies the 
world around him-what 
makes a baby sotp crying, 
why a stop sounds so sad and 
why men and women con- 
stantly strive to succeed 
when it would be simpler to 
quit. His errand boy, Tom, is 
in love with Kitty, a prosti- 
tute that works out of Nick's 
bar. Joe, who does not have a 
love, aids Tom in helping Kil- 
ls Kt-t out of her unhappy life 



because he realizes that this 
is the way Tom survives in 
this unhappy world. 

Many other interesting 
characters come to Nick*.: 
Kit Carson, the old cowboy; 
Harry, the comedian and 
dancer, Wesley, a down- 
and-out young man who 
plays a mean piano and Dud- 
ley, who keeps phoning his 
girl, Elsie, until she finally will 
talk to him on the phon' 
of these people are fighting 
to live a good life in a world 
on the brink of annihilation. 
Into the bar comes Bluk. 
He is a vice cop who wants to 
( Iran up the waterfront. This 
guy's bad-he doesn t want 
people to live their own 
lives-bul live the way he 
thinks they should. He's 
mean and he treats Kitt\ like 
dirt, wanting her to prove 
she's an a< tress-noi a wr* 

by Stripping like she (fid in 
burlesque. It takes all the 
good people in Nick's liar to 
put down this man who 
wants to quash the life out of 
people. 






The Time ot \ our | 



The Troy State University Lyceum Series 

presents 

HAMLET 



The Alabama Shake- 
speare Festival, one of 
the nation's leading 
professional theatres, pre- 
sented William Shake- 
speare's towering tragedy, 
Hamlet , Prince of Denmark , 
on September 26, 1988 in 



Smith Auditorium. Spon- 
sored by the Troy State Uni- 
versity Lyceum Series, the 
production of the Bard's 
monumental tale of love, 
murder and revenge was 
mounted directly from the 
Alabama Shakespeare Festi- 



val's home in Montgomery, 
Alabama. 

The ASF began its touring 
program in 1978 as a cultural 
and educational outreach 
program for the festival. 
Through touring, the ASF 
brings professional theater 



directly to citizens through- 
out the state and region. 

Shakespeare's most fam- 
ous tragedy tells the tale of 
how Hamlet's heroic quest 
for truth costs the young 
prince his love, liberty, and 
finally his life. 




144 Hamlet 



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Hamlot 145 



SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER 




CAST OF CHARACTERS 

SIR CHARLES MARLOW Sam Westmoreland 

YOUNG MARLOW Patrick Hall 

SQUIRE HARDCASTLE Mack Hillman 

GEORGE HASTINGS Wayne Simpkins 

TONY LUMPKIN C.J. Wilson 

DIGGORY Chris Rich 

ROGER Todd Lidh 

DICK Randall Ledkins 

STINGO Sam Westmoreland 

SLANG Allen McCall, Jr. 

MAT MUGGINS Michael Golebiewski 

TOM TWIST Danny Gilroy 

AMINADAB Tom Smiley 

MRS. HARDCASTLE Lynn Balducci 

KATE HARDCASTLE Leslie Ann Jones 

CONSTANCE NEVILLE Karen Hamilton 

MAID Gianna Reilly 

BARMAIDS Deidra Taylor, Amy Hunt 

POSTILLION Phillip McCanless 

JEREMY Michael Golebiewski 



a 



he 18th Century com- 
edy, "She Stoops To 
Conquer" by Oliver Gold- 
smith was presented by the 
TSU Department of Speech 
and Drama, under the direc- 
tion of Dr. David Dye, in 
Smith Hall Auditorium on 
October 20-23, 1988. 

The story takes place dur- 
ing one night in the 1800s 
when young Marlow and his 
friend, Hastings, travel from 
London to the country to vis- 
it the Hardcastles. Young 
Marlow and Kate Hardcastle, 
matched by their parents, 
have never met. On their 
journey Marlow and Hastings 
lose their way and ask for di- 
rections to the house at a tav- 
ern. The prankster, Tony 
Lumpkin, deceives the trav- 
elers into thinking that the 
Hardcastle's home is an inn 
and Mr. Hardcastle is the 
landlord. 

Young Marlow subse- 
quently assumes that Kate 
Hardcastle, who is wearing a 
house dress appropriate for 



the country, is a bar maid. 
Kate takes advantage of the 
misunderstanding to break 
down Marlow's reserve. Has- 
tings and Miss Neville, Mrs. 
Hardcastle's neice, plan an 
elopement and are assisted 
by Tony. Hardcastle's inept 
servants add to the merri- 
ment, and mistakes of the 
night are pleasantly correct- 
ed during the resolution of 
the plot. 

The costumes for the pro- 
duction were designed br 
Margaret Pyfrom, a former 
TSU theatre major. Ms. Py- 
from constructed garments 
from the original patterns of 
the late 1800's and according 
to Director Dr. David Dye, 
"She Stoops To Conquer" is 
one of the most elaborate 
costume productions ever 
presented by the depart- 
ment. The authenticity of the 
designs added to the audi- 
ence's appreciation of the 
play as one of the master- 
pieces of dramatic literature. 



146 She Stoops To Conquer 




^hr Stoops To Conquer 14" 



I J 



Auditicns 



As we, the audience, 
view a dramatic pro- 
duction, it is through 
the character's portrayal that 
the events and circum- 
stances of the play are made 
real to us. For this reason, the 
casting of characters in a play 
is crucial to its effectiveness 
as a performance. 

The process by which this 
careful selection is made is 
called auditioning. Through 
auditioning, potential cast 
members are able to try our 
for various available parts in a 
production. Regardless of 
the size of the part, auditon- 
ing is done to ensure that the 
best person for each particu- 
lar role is selected. Because 
all of the characters combine 
to make the overall produc- 
tion a success, no one part is 
less significant than another. 
The auditions and the cast- 
ing are done by the director 



of the production and each 
director varies in his style and 
method for conducting audi- 
tions. The auditions are con- 
ducted both privately and 
openly, depending on the 
director's preference. How- 
ever, generally speaking, au- 
ditioning may consist of 
reading a script with your in- 
terpretation of the character 
in the designated scene, im- 
promptu acting, performing 
a prepared monolouge, and 
if applicable to the produc- 
tion, an individual may be re- 
quested to sing. 

Patrick Hall, a TSU drama 
student, says that the most 
important thing to do in an 
audition is to be yourself. "It 
is important to relax and be 
yourself and if you're not se- 
lected, don't be offended, it 
simply means that the char- 
acter you auditioned for 
didn't best suit you." 



I 



While conducting the au- 
ditions, a director not only 
looks for talent but also for 
people who will be easy to 
work with. He also assesses 
an individual's diversity, as 
well as their capabilities and 
limits. 

Once the director has seen 
all of the potential cast, he 
begins to narrow down his 
choices. After this is done, he 
will announce the "call 
backs"-those persons who 
will get another chance to 
audition. This process con- 
tinues until the final casting 
selection is made. 

Through the careful selec- 
tion of the cast by the pro- 
cess of auditioning, a talent- 
ed and workable cast is 
hopefully created, who will 
in turn, perform the produc- 
tion in a professional and 
successful manner. 




148 Auditions 




fudmons 149 



Cheap 



Trick 



An Evening in the 
Lap of Luxuary 



On October 25, 1988, 
Cheap Trick brought 
their Lap of Luxuary 
tour to Garrett Coliseum in 
Montgomery. Sponsored by 
the Adams Center Union 
Board, the concert was the 
highlight of the fall quarter 
entertainment schedule. 

Femme Fatale, an increas- 
ingly popular rock and roll 
band served as the opening 
act. Singing such numbers as 
"Rebel"and "Falling In and 
Out of Love", the band 



warmed up the audience for 
the headlining act. 

Cheap Trick entertained 
the enthusiastic crowd by 
performing a variety of their 
hits both from the past and 
the present. Singing such 
current hits as "The Flame", 
"Let Go" and "Don't Be Cru- 
el" as well as some of their 
still popular former hits such 
as "The Dream Police" and "\ 
Want You To Want Me", the 
band put on a show that TSU 
students will not soon forget. 




Photography by Tim Jacobs 



150 Cheap Trick 






L 


/ ' 


/ * 




Cheap Irk* 151 



The United States Air Force Band 

presented by 
The TSU Lyseum Series 






The United States Air 
Force Band and Sing- 
ing Sergeants brought 
their 20-city tour to Troy 
State's Smith Hall Audito- 
rium on October 9,1988. The 
event was sponsored by the 
TSU Lyceum Series. 

The band, under the com- 
mand and conduction of 
Lieutenant Colonel James M. 
Bankhead, performed to a 
packed house of apprecia- 
tive TSU students and faculty 
and Troy community mem- 
bers. 

The band performed many 
delightful pieces including 
an exerpt from the "Grand 
Canyon Suite" and "A Rog- 
ers and Hammerstein Mem- 
oir". 

The Singing Sergeants 
brought the audience to 



their feet several times with a 
medley of songs which took 
everyone on a trip across 
America. Tunes such as 
"Chatanooga Choo-Choo", 
"Georgia on My Mind" and 
"Rocky Mountain High" 
were performed. 

The performance was a 
great success. As the audi- 
ence was leaving the audito- 
rium, many could be heard 
humming many of the tunes 
they had just heard. 



Top: Lt. Colonel James M. Bank- 
head serves as the commander and 
conductor for the Air Force Band 
and Singing Sergeants. 
Bottom: The entire ensemble of 
the Air Force Band performs many 
concerts throughout the country. 
Their performance in Troy was one 
stop on a 20-city tour. 





152 Lyceum Events 



The Troy State University Lyceum Series 

presents 

The Atlanta Chamber Players 




TSU's Lyceum Commit- 
tee, with help from 
Troy State's chapter of 
the Collegiate Music Educa- 
tor's National Conference 
brought the Atlanta Cham- 
ber Players to Smith Audito- 
rium on February 13, 1989. 

The group includes Pamela 
Askew, viola; Melanie 
Cramer, flute and music di- 
rector; Ian Ginsberg, cello; 
Thomas Jones, violin; and 
Paula Peace, piano. 
The five musicians studied 



at top schools of music and 
have received national ac- 
claim for their talents. Dr. 
Diane DeNicola, the assistant 
professor of music coordi- 
nating the event, described 
the Atlanta performers as a 
"young, up-and-coming 
premier group." 

The repertoire of the At- 
lanta Chamber Players ranges 
from the traditional master- 
pieces of Brahams and Bee- 
thoven to the more contem- 
porary classics of Ives and 



Shostakovish. 

The program included "Pi- 
ano Trio No. 4 in E Minor", by 
Antonin Dvorak; "Flute 
Quartet in G Major", by 
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 
and "Piano Quartet", by Aar- 
on Copland. 

In addition to the concert 
the group worked with the 
general studies music c lasses 
and some of the music major 
classes, lecturing and sharing 
thru own experiences. 



I ft cum Events 153 




n February 14, 1989, 
the long acclaimed 
group Chicago, 
performed at the Garret 
Coliseum in Montgomery as 
Troy State's Winter quarter 
concert. The concert was 
sponsored by the Adams 
Center Union Board. 

The seven-member band, 
which originally hails from 
the windy city, played to an 
appreciative audience of 
TSU students. The band's mix 
of love songs and pop-rock 
music enhanced the already 
romantic atmosphere of Val- 
entines Day. 

The band performed a va- 
riety of their music from 
both the past and the pre- 
sent. Songs such as "Saturday 
in the Park" and "Color My 
World" pleased the older, 
long-time followers of the 



group, while newer and 
more current songs such as 
"You're the Inspiration" and 
"Look Away" entertained 
the newer Chicago fans. 

The band's utilization of 
many brass and woodwind 
instruments is but one of 
their distinct trademarks. 
These additional instruments 
were used to enhance both 
the music and the atmo- 
sphere. 

Overall, the evening's per- 
formance was one in which 
an individual could sit back, 
relax and enjoy a variety of 
entertaining, good music. 





154 Chicago 




Chuago 155 



^J 



BRIGHTON 
BEACH 

MEMOIRS KP 

a play by |^'^ f ^r 

NEIL SIMON 







1 

Cast of Characters 

Eugene Wayne Simpkins 

Blanche Margaret Byrd Wingate 

Kate Lynne Balducci 

Laurie Ashley Mann 

Nora Elizabeth Fowler 

Stanley C.J. Wilson 

Jack Danny Gilroy 

Director David Dye 





156 Brighton Beach Memoirs 





Brighton Beach Mem- 
oirs is Neil Simon's 
autobiographical 
memory play, a portrait of a 
writer as a Brooklyn teen- 
ager in 1937 living with his 
family in crowded, lower- 
middle-class circumstances. 
Eugene is the narrator and 
central character. His mind is 
full of fiercely fantasized 
dreams of baseball and dimly 
fantasized images of girls. 

The play's scenes consists 
of a few days in the life of a 
struggling Jewish household 
that includes Eugene's hard 
working father, Peter; his 
sharp-tongued mother, 
Kate; his older and vastly 
more experienced brother, 



Stanley; his widowed Aunt 
Blanche and her two young 
daughters. As Eugene's fa- 
ther says, "if you didn't have 
a problem, you wouldn't live 
in this house." Two have 
heart disease, one has asth- 
ma, two at least temporarily 
lose jobs needed to keep the 
straitened family afloat. 

Mr. Simon uses the family 
miseries to raise such endur- 
ing issues as sibling resent- 
ments, guilt-ridden parent- 
child relationships and the 
hunger for dignity in a pov- 
erty-stricken world. It is a 
deeply appealing play that 
deftly mixes drama with 
comedy. 



Brighton Beach Memoir- 










■ 




r 



i 



Photography by: Cara English 




158 Carmen 




c 




armen 



The Troy State Universi- 
ty Opera Workshop 
presented 'Carmen' in 
Smith Hall Auditorium on 
May 17, 19-20, 1989. Accord- 
ing to Dr. Phil Kelley, direc- 
tor, "The opera is probably 
one of the the most popular 
of all operas and has been 
sung on stages throughout 
the world." 

Action, love, adventure 
and murder plots, dialogue 
and comedy combine with 
music for the opera, set in 
old Seville, Spain. The story 
centers around the life of a 
gypsy girl named Carmen 
who works in a cigarette fac- 



tory. She entices a corporal 
of the guard to forsake his dl- 
legiance to the law, his home 
and his country in order to 
join a band of smugglers. 

The leading characters 
were portrayed by Tamara 
Lee Boyd, a senior from Do- 
than, AL, as Carmen, Don 
Aplin, a senior from Crist- 
view, FL , as Don Jose, Jenni- 
fer Lyn Birks, a senior from 
Seminole, AL, as Micaela and 
Rob Ivey, a senior from Ric h- 
land, GA, as Escamillo. 

The opera combined great 
talent, beautiful scenery and 
authenic costumes to create 
a memorable performance 



Carmen 159 




160 Organizations 




Troy State 




Organizations 








Being in a organization means more than just paying dues and showing up for the 
yearbook photo at TSU. It takes hard work and dedication to achieve the active goals 
of the TSU organizations. From international parties and picnics sponsored by 
members of the Internation Student Cultural Organization to weekly activities by 

(groups like the Baptist Student Union, Delta Sigma Pi and many more. 
Each Organization offers TSU students a place were they can have some fun and 





Derek Brown 
Heath DeRamus 
Cara English 
Tim Jacobs 
Ed Moseley 
Donald Norsworthy 
Photographers 



Amanda Merrill 
Section Editor 



Amy Evans 
Contributing Editor 



ini/dtions 161 



Student Government Association 



Acting on the reconstruc- 
tion that occurred during the 
past administration, this 
year's Student Government 
Association has gone forth to 
enhance relationships 
among students, between 
students and University per- 
sonnel. We began the year 
with a new procedure in re- 
gard to student senate elec- 
tions. For the first time in 
years, a campus wide cam- 
paign was necessary to win a 
Senate seat. 

Homecoming 1988 was a 
big event for the SGA, as it 
was dedicated to retiring 
Chancellor Ralph W. Adams. 
With the overall theme of 
"Thank You, Dr. and Mrs. 
Adams," the SGA and the 



Debbie McGM 
President 

student body was more in- 
volved than ever before in 
the week-long activities of 
Homecoming. 

Other successful events 
followed throughout the 
year, including Alcohol 
Awareness Week, the annual 
basketball tournament, and 
the community Easter-egg 
hunt. 

The success of the SGA has 
come from the dedication 
and hard work of the officers 
and the young, ambitious 
Senate. With unity and per- 
severance, the SGA estab- 
lished itself as a respected 
and efficient organization on 
the Troy State campus in the 
state of Alabama. 




Charles Tipton 
Vice President 



David Johnson 
Secretary 



Vince Stansbury 
Clerk 




lo/i Left Students i .ist thi 
Homecoming Queen \ record 987 
students voted m the cliM lion pre- 
liminaries 

Top Right: SCA secretary, I 
Johnson and senators Kell) I 
and Mandy Merrill keep the elec- 
tion line moving smoothly. 




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1 II 

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Left Traffic Appeals Committee: 
)ace Albur\ Mlison \\ illiford, Mutts 
rdelberg, and Cam Orbaugh 






SGA 



Executive Committee: Shannon 
Frith, Penny Brannon, Bob Williams 
and Scott Steele. 

Supreme Court: Row One: Sheryl 
Streets, Caprice DeFalco, Anne- 
marie Bell, Kari Lovfald and Donna 
Watson. Row Two: Daniel Dwyer, 
Scott Buff, Dale Lunn, Garry Cannon 
and Larry Crisp. 





1 90 




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rransTt 





rill^l 





I Rift r/GI^.L 




Senators: Row One: s j/anne 
Steele, Nina |o Webb, KelK Turner 
Kandicc Shiver and Dalisa Taylor. 
Row Two: Ray Windham, 5 
Shamburger, Keith Skclton and 
Scott Steele. 



Senators: Row One: Lisa Robin- 
son, Jackie Lalka, Pam McEwan,Bett\ 
Ann Jipp and Stephania H\de Row 
Two: Marcus Paramore, Troy Hor- 
ton, Mandy Merrill, Michael Mad- 
dox and Kermit Johnson. 



Senators: Row One: Teresa Cro- 
zier, Lisa Carpenter Michelli 
tin, Gena Bentkowski and 1 
Gross. Row Two: Ken I Icier Leigh 
Bowers, Penru Brannon, Janet 
Daughern and Phillip Gibson. 



SGA 165 



Men's Residence 






Herbert Reeves 

Coordinator of 
Men's Residence 



Right: Resident Assistants: Row 
One: Mark Miklas and Steve Cillis. 
Row Two: John Til lis and Mike Turk. 




Resident Assistants: Row One: Mike Spivey and Andrew Sewell. Row Resident Assistants: Row One: Patrick Broderick and Marshall Major. 
Two: Bill Godwin and Tom Shepherd. Row Three: Dexter Oden and Row Two: Darren Hipps and Mike Dahl. Row Three: John Holley and Eric 
Carlos Mays. Row Four: Clint McCrory, Martin Carter and David Dawson. Howes. 



166 Men's Residence 




I he Resideru e l fall program 
at Troy St.itc plays an impor- 
tant role in the lives of 1 1 w on 

campus residents. I he mem- 
bers ot tiie residence hall 
staff work to create a home- 
like atmosphere in the dor- 
mitories, while at the same 
time maintain a sense of or- 
der. 

Under the direc tion of 
Herbert Reeves, Coordina- 
tor of Men's Residence, stu- 
dents are selected for the 
positions of resident direc- 
tors and resident assistants. 
Selection for staff positions is 
based on an application and 
interview process. Men in- 
terested are expected to 
maintain an appropriate 
grade point average and to 
promote the University and 
its functions. 

Charles Gillis 

Resident Manager 
Dill Hall 




Norris Brooks 

Residence Director 
Clements Hall 



Charles Tipton 

Residence Director 
Alumni Hal! 



\ssistanl Residence Directors Danny 

1 Ut.HU'llo .Hill Boh \\ llll.v 



Men S Residence 167 



Women's Residence 



The Women's Residence 
staff is made up of capable 
and responsible female stu- 
dents who do their best to 
make living in a dorm a home 
away from home. 

The coordinator of Wom- 
en's Residence is Laurianne 
Herndon. The Resident Di- 
rector's, Resident Assistant's 
and Mrs. Herndon work to- 
gether to make on campus 
living a positive aspect of col- 
lege life. 




Laurianne Herndon 


Lisa Heard 


Leslie Ogden 


Coordinator of 


Director of 


Resident Director 


Women's Residence 


Desk Assistants 


Clements Hall 




Resident Assistants: Row one: Pam 
Carnegia, Berna Hetzel, Angela 
Hammons, Angela Reisch and Jenny 
Atkinson. Row two: Berkleigh 



Smith, Barbara Woolard, Debbie 
Barber, Jodi Shank, Audrey Merrill, 
Valerie Ohman, Leslie Ogden, Sandy 
Vandagriff and Kari Lovfald. 



168 Women's Residence 



Resident Assistants: Row one: Alli- 
son Ohm.m, Dee Dec l.ivlor, Sl.u \ 
Clark, Tabby Timbs and Kim Kelle) 
Row two: Amy Marker!, Ann Hud- 



son, Kimmie Irvin, Deborah Mack, 

Yvonne Sweat, Sheryl Streets and 

Susan Miller. 







ience 169 



Mortar Board 




The Troy State University 
Spires Chapter of Mortar 
Board has been recognized 
by the national Mortar Board 
Society for the past ten years. 
Since its establishment on 
campus, the Spires Chapter 
has continually recognized 
outstanding seniors from 
various fields of study. New 
members are selected on the 
basis of scholarship, leader- 
ship, and service. Candidates 
must be at least in their ju- 
nior year and must have at- 
tained a minumum GPA of 
3.0 on a 4.0 scale. 

Mortar Board was involved 
in several activities during 
the 1988-89 academic year. 
These activities included the 
selling of raffle tickets for a 
football team and also the 
selling of TSU calendars. The 
proceeds from these activi- 




ties went into the fund to 
place the picture of Mrs. 
Dorothy Adams in the Ad- 
ams Center on the second 
floor. 

Officers: Greta Kantor; Treasurer, 
Donna Ivey; Vice-president, Ricky 
Padgett; Secretary, Laura Stephen- 
son; President, Kathy Smith; Histori- 
an. 




Row One: Greta Kantor, Shannon 
Frith, Donna Ivey, Laura Stephen- 



son, and Kathy Smith. Row Two: 
Ricky Padgett, Carolyn Gibson, Be- 



verly Gibson, Dr. Rhae Swisher, and 
Steve Grice. 



170 Mortar Board 







Top: Steve Grice is honored with a 
rnedal. 

Middle Nc-n Initiates Row One: 
Elecia Bautwell, Charla Farmer. Ra\ 
Winborne. Cathv Turber\ille. \n- 
gelj Turner Yvette (inright, M 
Anderson, Daniel Dwyei ^m\ 

Strickland) lanet Daugherty, luhe 

Thorpe and K.in I ovfald Ron Two: 
Elizabeth Sumnei Dr lanelle Flrod. 
Andrew CheeK Leslie \nru- '■ 
Denise Taunton, Deanna Tj\lor Re- 
gina Home Tr.n\ f\i i i, Barbara 
Woolard. Tro\ King 
and Brian )ordan 

Rottnm Mortu Boar d students 

drive Or \dams tar in the H 
coming parade 



Mortar Board 1~1 



Gamma Beta Phi 



The purpose of Gamma 
Beta Phi is to recognize and 
encourage individual excel- 
lence in education, promote 
the development of leader- 
ship ability and character, 
and to foster, disseminate 
and improve education 
through appropriate service 
projects. The requirements 
for membership are any stu- 
dents with a GPA in the top 
20% of their class. 



ir 



r 



^ 



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3a& •<££'.. 



Officers: Row One: Angela Ham- 
mons; Second Vice-president, Les- 
ley Ogden; President, David Pea- 
cock; First Vice-president. Row 
Two: Lexie Crowsonl; Recording 
Secretary, Cindy Lovack; Parliamen- 
tarian, Regina Horn; Corrsponding 
Secretary. 



1IIIUII1 



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•' $# fi-rr- " 



fat r-c^ 



Row One: Lesley Ogden, Amy M. 
Mitchell, Karen Morrow, Keith 
Skelton, Sharon Jo Davis, Holly Funk, 
Bonnie Buol, Ann Marie Johnson, 
Martha A. Kelly, Angela D. Bean, 
Yvonne J. Whitaker, J. Bart Roden- 
baugh, Amy Larimer, Janet Seay, Jen- 
nifer Johnson, Lafran Knight, Moni- 
ca Hasley, Sharon D. Holmes, Kath- 
arine Sellers, Meredith Murphy, 
Theresa Hayes, Renee Kirby, Jenni- 
fer Baily, Laura Leigh Elmore, Mary 
Griffin Row Two: Jimmy C. Fryer, 



Curtis Frazier, Jr., Robert K. Sanders, 
Joni George, Lexie Crowson, Sherrie 
Oates, Julie Meadows, Nancy Vass, 
Jenny Panhorst, Regina Home, Shar- 
on Wismer, Wanda Wade, Daniel 
Dwyer, Pam Clark, Carol Bowen 
Row Three: Vince Stansbury, An- 
gela Hammons. Laura Sanders, Tracy 
Hughes, Elizabeth Sanders, Jana 
Lamberth, Tammie Yancey, Diana 
Sobottka, Ray White, Cindy Kobet, 
Diane Blackmon, Christina L. Tyler, 
Kim Wickline, Yvette McClung, 



Sherry Odom, Kim Rash, Mike 
Owens, Stephanie Falkenberry Row 
Four: Teresa Stone, Floyd McKin- 
ney, Leslie Dozier, Lisa A. Robinson, 
Rebecca Money, Jana Burkett, 
Chrissie McLeroy, Annette Chunn, 
Julie Eslinger, Tairita Brown, Cather- 
ine Thomas, Susan Johnson, Ondrea 
Hart, Suzanne Romano, Diane 
Aman, Barbara Bennett, Barbara H. 
Sanders, Kim Howell, Cathy Everett, 
Deborah McGill Row Five: Dennis 
Griffith, Bill Moore, Herman C. Sim- 



mons, Mark Vansandt, Tammy 
Campbell, David Johnson, Chad 
DeNeve, Doug Welch, William F. 
Remus, Don Pleauv, Jeffrey D. 
Brown, Darren Cannon, Dale Lunn, 
Sohail Agboatwala, Alan Cutler, Da- 
vid Peacock, Patricia Barrow, 
Vanessa Lewis, Peggy Lowe, Sherry 
Green, Jonathan Bradford, Laura 
Cook, Adrienne McCrae, Renee 
Gunter, Michael Pezent, Sherri In- 
gram, Patricia Garcia, Caroline Mith- 
ika. 



172 Gamma Beta Phi 



Beta Beta Beta 




This biological society en- 
courages h i k h scholastic 
acheivement, understanding 
of scientific knowledge, and 
promotion of biological re- 
search. Beta Beta Beta is for 
undergraduate students who 
wish to obtain more know- 
lege in the field of the natural 
sciences. 

Officers: Amy Larimer; President, 
Regina Home; Secretary, Tiffany 
McDonald; Treasurer. 
Bottom: Row One: Kimberly Har- 
vey, Sandra Moultrie, Sandra Davis, 
Amy Larimar, Kim Rice, and Kylie 
Rice. Row Two: Michael Roshon, 
Gilberto Bonce, Regina Home and 
Teresa Moore advisor. 




i J i -i m 



Bru Beta B«<u 1" ' 



Alpha Lambda Delta is a 
national society which hon- 
ors high scholastic achieve- 
ment during the first year of 
college. The purpose of the 
organization is to encourage 
superior scholastic achieve- 
ment among students in 
their first year in institutions 
of higher education, to con- 
tinue a high standard of 
learning and to assist men 
and women in recognizing 
and developing meaningful 
goals for their roles in soci- 
ety. 

Alpha Lambda Delta meets 
monthly and one of its main 
projects is working with the 
administration on the Hon- 
ors Convocation. 



Alpha Lambda Delta 




Top: 1989 initiates: Row One: Jeff 
Strouse, Phil McLaney, Daniel 
Schmude, Derrick Moss, Kathryn 
Knodel, Mike Celka, Holly Long, 
Brett Rope, Lance Wallace, Andy 
Davis, Chris Waites, Jason Capstraw 
and Sean O'Hara. Row Two: Jacque- 
line Lalka, Lisa Hooks, Shoran Hud- 
speth, Sharla Park, Annette Golden, 
Nan Walker, Sabrina Pugh, Theresa 



Martin, Becky Kelley, Kimberly 
Wagner, Dawn Hutchinson, Karen 
Locke, Liz Brannen and Teresa 
Stone. Row Three: Michelle Owen, 
Cindy Tisdale, Nadine Pitts, Nellie 
Chun, Alvis Jackson, Dionne John- 
son, Brenda Simmons, Venesia 
McClaney, Christy Curington, Shelli 
Burkhalter and Ivy Dickerson. 



174 Alpha Lambda Delta 




Opposite f'.ixr Bottom Lett Alpha 
Lambda Delta officers: Bonnie Buol; 

News Editor, Ben Griggs, President, 

Rosalinda Skeen; Senior Advisor, 
Todd Lidh; Junior Advisor and Gau- 
tam Advani; Vice President. 
( enter: Miss Cordelia Gray pre- 
sents a membership certificate to 
new initiate Liz Brannen. 



This Page Top Ihi-rrsa Martin and 
Holly Long pass th<- 1 ercmonial can- 
dle as Karen Lo( k<- loot s on. 
Top Ri?;ht R<-( IpientI of the Alpha 
Lambda Delta Academic and Lead- 
ership Scholarships were Dl 
Taunton and Todd Lidh, standing 
between Ben Griggs, President and 
Mrs. Mary Smith, Faculty Advisor. 



Above: Old Members: Row One: 
Michael Owens, Gautam Advani, 
Tracy Rosenquist, Stanton Kelley, 
Ben Griggs, Todd Lidh and Nereida 
Dewberry. Row Two: Michelle 
Moultrie, Audrey Hutchison, Tracy 
Hughes, Holly Funk, Angela Blakely, 



Nancy Gibson, (Catherine Sellers, 
Elizabeth Miller and Rosalinda 
Skeen. Row Three: Cossondra 
Dunn, Nancy Vass, Alison Ohman, 
Karen Morrow, Pam Owens, Traci 
Paramore, Bonnie Buol and Denise 
Taunton. 



Alpha Lambda Delta 175 



Phi Eta Sigma 









Phi Eta Sigma is a freshmen 
honor society for students 
who have maintained a 3.5 
GPA for two quarters. This 
year's Golden Key award 
waspresented to Mark Ales- 
sandroni. 

Row One: Jeff Strouse, David Bry- 
ant, Derrick Moss, Jason McCul- 
lough, Robert Templin, Pedros As- 
gedom, Sohail Agboatwala, Shawn 
Ward, Cautam Advani, Timothy 
Vickery and Chris Pugh. Row Two: 
Nellie Chun, Candy Stallings, Tatie 
Wood, Dalisia Taylor, Kimberly 
Wagner, Angela Perry, Lisa Hooks, 
Tracey Killough, Lori Hall, Beth Hen- 
derson, Venesia McClaney, Ashley 
Mann, Khristy Louring and Lisa 
Simpson. Row Three: Marc San- 
born, Leigh Mundy, Tracy Rosen- 
quist, Kathryn Knodel, Carol Fair- 
cloth, Melanie Gibson, Sharla Park, 
Karen Locke, Holly Long, Chrissy 
Balmer, Donna Frater, KShoran 
Hudspeth, Dawn Hutchinson, Jackie 
Lalka and James Woodall. 








Alpha Phi Sigma is a crimi- 
nal justice and corrections 
honor society for students 
who have a 3.0 GPA overa 
and a 3.2 GPA in either crimi- 
nal justice or corrections. 

Row One: Dr. Charlie Jones, Ad- 
visor; Wendy Bowen, Secretary 
/Treasurer; Dr. Johnny Long, Dean 
of School of Arts and Sciences and- 
Mark Dvork, Vice-president. Row 
Two: Freddy Brooks, Doug Parra- 
more, Jonathan Capps and Dennis 
Griffith, President. 




176 Phi Eta Sigma/Alpha Phi Sigma 




Beta Upsilon Sigma 




Beta Upsilon Sigma is .t 
business honor society foi 
juniors and seniors who have 
shown a distinguished ability 
in the held ot business and in 
scholarship. Membership is 
limited to juniors with a GPA 
of 3.8 or who rank inthe top 
five percent of their class and 
seniors with a GPA of 2.6 or 
who rank in the top ten per- 
cent of their class. 

Row One: Amanda Cospcr, Susan 
Stewart, Ginger Piazza and Carol 
Anne Mitchell Row Two: Candy 
Stallings, , Diane Sobottka and Rob- 
in Row Three: Patty McFillcn. Leslie 
Ogden and Donna Ivey Row Four: 
Bart Rodenbaugh, Tommy Faulken- 
berry, Jan Harrison and Doug Mims. 
Row Five: Shannon Frith, Mike Mu- 
sick, Mr. Robert Palmer, and Bryan 
Hall. 



Omicron Delta Kappa 




KOft" »,■.<: J. 





- > 



* * * 



I 



f'vl 



LilVk-4m^&&^ 












Row One: Troy King, Keith Skelton. 
Leslie Dozier, Julie Nolan, Janet 
Daugherty, Laura Benefield, Greta 
Kantor, Debbie McGill, Stephanie 
Medley. Annemarie Bell, Monica 
Anderson, Dr. John Long, Dr. Ralph 
Adams, Dr. Jan Elrod and Dr. Eugene 
Onasta Row Two: Caroline Gibson. 
Pat Smith, Leslie Ogden, Julie 
Thorpe, Dr Charles Chapman, Dr. 
Phil Kelley, Beth Sumner, Pattv 
McFillen, Arm Markert Michelle Fi- 
vian, Gena Bentkcmski -Vr.v Smith. 
Caths Turberville, KclU Turner 
Sherrie Wallace Dl Norma Mitch- 
ell, Cindy Kobet, Catherine Work 
Rosalinda Skeen and Leslie ^ne 
Jones Row Three: Bart Hendricks 
|ett Preston Dr \ cf Barm tt 
Sherman, Ra\ Winhorne. Peter 
Howard, Daniel Dwyer, Dr William 
Denison, Brian Cain, Dr. Ra\ Swi-h- 
er states ( o.itev Phil Weaver. Joey 
Knight. Dr lames Oneal Dale Lunn, 
Jacqueline Smith Ron Pierce lean 
Mars and lodd Lidh 



Beta Lpsilon Sigma ODK 177 



mem 






Kappa Kappa Psi 




Right: Brothers: Dennis Kirby, Advi- 
sor Ralph Ford, Michael Wicher- 
sheim, Eric Williams, Dean Alex- 
ander, David Newsome, John 
McCall, Brian Henry, Doug Bell, Jeff 
Fowler, Dean Barrow and Jim Fitzpa- 
trick. 

Below: Winter Pledge Class: Andre 
Burgess, Evern Williams, Tommy 
Seay and Joe Hughes. 







Right: 1988-89 Officers: Michael 
Wichersheim; Treasurer, Dean Alex- 
ander; Secretary, Eric Williams; Vice 
President, Brian Henry; President, 
Ralph Ford; Advisor, John Mike 
McCall; Warden and Jim Fitzpatrick; 
Historian. 




178 Kappa Kappa Psi 







Serving the Sound of the 
South in multiple art 
Kappa Kappa Psi is a growing 
band fraternity at Troy St.ite 
University. Kappa Kappa Psi 
holds several fundraisers 
during the year, all profit go- 
ing to the Sound of the 
South. The fraternity helps 
provide transportation and 
loading services for away 
games and also keeps the 
band suppplied with water 
and refreshments during 
band practices. Two of 
Kappa Kappa Psi's main pro- 
jects for 1988-89 were the 
production of a cassete tape 
featuring the Sound of the 
South performing all the 
songs of their 1988 marching 
band season and VCR tapes 
of the inagural parade in 
which the Kappa Kappa Psi 
brothers assisted the band. 
Additionally, the fraterniu 
sold the "official" Sound of 
the South Band T-shirts. 






Top: Tommy Seay and Eric Wil- 
liams rehearse for an upcoming 
band concert. 

Bottom Left: Several Kappa Kappa 
Psi brothers discuss the results of a 
recent fundraiser. 

Bottom Right: )ohn Mike McCall 
and Brian Henry show why Kappa 
Kappa is a valued service organiza- 
tion as well as honorary fraternity. 



Kappa Kappa Psi 1~ Q 



Kappa Delta Pi 



The oldest honor society at 
Troy State University, Kappa 
Delta Pi recognizes out- 
standing contributions in the 
field of education. The privi- 
lege of membership is ex- 
tended to persons who ex- 
hibit commendable personal 
qualities, worthy educational 
ideals and sound scholarship. 
Juniors, seniors and graduate 
students in the upper one- 
fifth of the college academic 
rating are invited to mem- 
bership. In 1989, the organi- 
zation continued its fellow- 
ship under the advisement of 
Dr. Hazel Marsicano. 



Top: Dr. Mary Ann Tighe, Lisa 
Thornton, Margo Nordmeyer and 
Laura Mooney. 

Middle: Melissa Mincey, Donna 
Mann, Paula Lowrey, Terri Dee and 
Linda Crew. 

Bottom Right: Laura Kemp, Charles 
Cook, Michele Cobb, Debbie 
Carter, Elecia Boutwell and Regina 
Booth. Mrs. Carol Kimbrough; Asso- 
ciate Counselor and Dr. Hazel Mar- 
sicano; Counselor. 
1989 Officers, Not Shown: Mrs. Car- 
ol Kimbrough; Associate Counselor, 
Dr. Hazel Marsicano; Counselor, 
Patsy Eisler; President, Tracy Wright; 
First Vice-President, Beverly McCain- 
Historian, Angela Reisch; Second 
Vice-President, Joy McKnight; Sec- 
retary, Dr. Joyce Wiess; Treasurer 
and Phillip E. Weaver; Reporter. 




Top: First Vice-President, Tracy 
Wright pins Regina Booth during 
the initiation ceremony. 




180 Kappa Delta Pi 



Phi Kappa Phi 




Organized at the Universi- 
ty of Maine in 1897 as «i lot ,il 
honor soc iety, Phi Kappa Phi 
became a national society in 
1900 and was the first honor 
society to recognize superior 
scholarship in all fields of 
study. Generally, the initiates 
come from those outstand- 
ing seniors who are in the top 
ten percent of their class and 
have compiled a cumulative 
GPA of at least 3.6. Juniors 
who are elected must have a 
minimum average of 3.8. 




Receptionsare held each quarter for 
the new initiates of Phi Kappa Phi 
Top Left: Fall Initiates: Rhonda Pe- 
ters, Joy Mcknight, Shan Sessions, 
Kendall Coates, Laura Leverc t te, |im 
Murdock, Tangie Scott, Shannon 
Frith, Leslie Ogden, Tammy Scho- 
field and Amy Meacham 
Bottom Left: Winter Initiates and 
Guests Row One: Dr Curth Portei 
Julia Dillard, Dr. Anna Smith. Bart 
Hendricks, Scott Reeves, Denise 
Taunton, Donna Ivy, Amanda 
McDaniels and Dr. Joseph Miu hell 
Row Two: Dr. Norma Mitchell 
Cathy Denn\, Dr Ralph ^dams, Dr 
Eugene Omasta and Laura Stephen- 
son. 

Above: Dr. Curtis Porter taps Don- 
na lw into Phi Kappa Phi during one 
of her classes. 



Phi Kappa Phi 181 



Phi Alpha Theta 




The lota Mu Chapter of Phi 
Alpha Theta is an interna- 
tional honorary history soci- 
ety that promotes excellence 
in historical study by the stu- 
dents and the faculty mem- 
bers. Membership selections 
are based on knowledge and 
superior writing skills in the 
area of history. 

Top: A gathering of members of 
Phi Alpha Theta. 





Row One: Keith Skelton, Scott Buff, Watley. Row Two: Mike Lambeth, Bill Rice, Joe Shahade, Angela Ham- 
Edwin Jones, Tammy Green, Rosa- John Woods, Joanna Brantley, and mons, Waller Martin, Dan Blalock, 
linda Skeen, Troy King, and Paula , Dr. Milton McPherson. Row Three: and Dr. Earl Smith. 



182 Phi Alpha Theta 






University Honors Alliance 




The University Honors 
Alliance is the official student 
voice in the University Hon- 
ors Program. The Alliaru e 
was formed in 1988-89 by the 
Student Hnors Advisory 
Council. This council is made 
up of students representing 
all disciplines of academic 
life at Troy State University. 
These students are appoint- 
ed by the Deans of the var- 
ious departments and the 
Honors Council. 

Duties of the council in- 
clude recruiting and plan- 
ning, distributing informa- 
tion and assisting in the ad- 
visement of students in the 
University Honors Program. 







Top: Members of the Student 
Honors Advisory Council: Row One: 
Tommy Hoomes, Catharina Phillips, 
Kevin Green, Ray Winborne, Julie 
Nolan, Jennifer Birks and Vicki Hy- 
att Row Two: Dr. Emma Norris h/ 
Williams, Catherine Work and 
Stephanie Medle\ Not Shown: \ ,il- 
erie Herbert, Bart Hendricks, Mark 
Allessandroni and Barry Frost. 
Middle Left: Stephanie Medley and 



Ra\ Winborne oversee discussion 
onpublu iu tor the Honors Program 
Middle Rii;ht Kevin Green n 
his notes on chartering proct 
for new organizations 
Bottom: University Honors Alli- 
ance Officers Kevin (• 
President. Stephanie Medley; Sec- 
retary, Catherine Work Treasurer 
and Ra\ Winborne President 



I m\,ersii\ Honors Mhance 183 



ISCO 



The purpose of the Inter- 
national Students Cultural 
Organization is to create and 
promote brotherhood with 
foreign students attending 
Troy State. This goal is being 
achieved not only because of 
the interesting weekly meet- 
ings, the annual ISCO Festi- 
val, and the new Internation- 
al House being built, but be- 
cause the friendships built in 
ISCO go beyond organized 
activity. At any given time a 
group of these foreign and 



American students may be 
found eating pizza together, 
socializing at SAGA, taking 
road trips, partying or just 
hanging out. Social interac- 
tion is always a mutual ex- 
change of culture, food and 
ideals that gives both foreign 
and American students a 
broadening world view. And 
world view is exactly the type 
of life changing concept 
ISCO strives to impart to col- 
lege students. 





Top: Foreign and American stu- 
dents dance in authentic costumes 
at the ISCO festival. 
Bottom: A panel of students give 
insight to foreign cultures as they 
answer questions from the audi- 
ence. 








7"op /e/f. Officers: Row One: Amy 
Marked; Secretary and Rita Patel; 
Historian Row Two: Paul Louis; 
Vice-president and Philip Curtis; 
Publicity. Not Shown: Kelly Lar- 
oche; President and Sohail Ag- 
boatwala; Treasurer 
Top right: Kelly Laroche and Sohail 
Agboatwala present Dr. and Mrs. 
Adams with an honorary plaque at 
the ISCO festival 

Middle: Row One: Amy Market, 
Haresh Sujan, Susan Young and Ner- 
eida Dewberry Row Two: Carmella 
Snook, Sheryl Streets, Lisa Simpson, 
Ruth Rosentrater, Laura Cook and 
Doris Lee Row Three: Michael 
Owens, Billy Daniels, Rachael Smith, 
Alex Wright, Valerie Ohman and 
Philip Curtis. Row Four: Michael 
Roshen, Leslie Bennet Mrs Helen 
Hutto and Pam Lu>>k Row Five: 
Catherine Reid, Gent Mende, rmrr 
Sigurgeisson, Nancy Sikes David 
Steinheimer, Toru Ishii, Tro\ MilK 
and Oliver Groeger Row Six: Pame- 
la Merkel, Dr. Ed Merkel, lames 
Sherry, Joe Morgan, \ in Sundaram, 
Hem Vyas, Masayuki Konishi, Fred 
Estivanz and Peter Simpson. 
Bottom: ISCO students proudly 
carry the flags of their "home- 
lands". 






ISCO 185 



Alpha Epsilon Delta 



The goals of Alpha Epsilon 
Delta are to encourage ex- 
cellence in premedical 
scholarship, to stimulate an 
appreciation of the impor- 
tance of premedical educa- 
tion, and to use its knowl- 
edge for the benefit of health 
organizations, charities, and 
the community. The Troy 
State chapter strives to main- 
tain each of these goals un- 
der the leadership of its advi- 
sor, Dr. Charles Chapman. 

Top: Officers: Row One: Amy 
Markert; Historian, Kevin Green; 
President and Valerie Ohman; Sec- 
retary. Row Two: Scott Mitchell; 
Vice-president, David Peacock; 
Treasurer and Lexie Crowson; Re- 
porter. 

Bottom: Row One: Amy Markert, 
Amy Mitchell, Lee Dean, Michele 
Payne, Yvette Jinright and Valerie 
Ohman. Row Two: Yvette William- 
son, Michael Roshan, Ken Puckett, 
and Sheila Elmore. Row Three: Scott 
Mitchell, Lexie Crowson, Paul Wil- 
liams, David Peacock, and Mary 
Anne Moncrieff. Row Four: Chris 
Waites, Kevin Green, Kraig Mitchell, 
Helena Sviglin and Ben Griggs. 





186 Alpha Epsilon Delta 







Left: SNEA members and visitors 
attend an informational meeting 
Spring Quarter. 

Above: SNEA officers: Row One: 
Dr. Forrest Petry; Advisor and Tonya 
Prevatt; Secretary. Row Two: Shirley 
McLendon; Recording Secretary 
and Elicia Boutwell; Membership 
Chairman/Treasurer. Not Shown: 
Kitty Blankenship; President and 
Robert Jones; Vice President. 



Established for the college 
student of Alabama interest- 
ed in the profession of teach- 
ing, the Student National 
Education Association strives 
to help students understand 
and appreciate the teaching 
profession. SNEA also gives 
students preparing to teach 
practical experience in 
working together and in 
working with local, state and 
national education associ- 
ations on problems of the 
profession and of the society. 




Sigma Tau Delta 




Sigma Tau Delta is made up 
of men and women majoring 
and minoring in English who 
are interested in excellent 
writing, worthwhile reading 
and fellowship among those 
likeminded. Candidates must 
be in the top 35° o of their 
class and must have complet- 
ed five quarters of college 
work, including at least two 
upper level English courses. 

Sigma Tau Delta members include: 
Row One: Marsha More-land. Tro\ 
King, Todd Lidh, Dr. left Cupp, Dr. 
|osh Copeland, Mr Charles dinger 
and Dr. James Da\ Row Two: C hn-.- 
sie McLeros . Rebec c a LaPalme Cin- 
dy Cobet, Dr. Marv Ann Tighe 
Kathenne Morrow Melissa Cullev 
and Trao Robmette Row Three: 
Carla Johnson, Stace\ Clark, |ana 
Burkett and Phil \\ea\er 



SNEA/Sigma Tau Delta 187 



Sigma Alpha Sigma 




188 Sigma Alpha Sigma 



Art Guild 




The purpose of the Art 
Guild is to promote interest 
in the arts and give students 
the opportunity to pdrti< i- 
pate in individual and de- 
partmental projects. A rum- 
mage sale was sponsored by 
the Guild during winter 
quarter 1989 for the Alic e 
Green Thornton Scholarship 
fund, a scholarship for excel- 
ling art majors. Each Art 
Guild meeting consisted of 
interesting programs such as 
special speakers and a trip to 
the Montgomery museum. 
The Guild also worked hard 
to promote the art exhibits in 
Malone Hall. 




Top: Art Guild members: Row 
One: F\it Duke; advisor, Lois Turner, 
Felicia Pierce, Thomas Hoomes and 
Robin Sapp Stenger. Row Two: Nat- 
alie Litwinowicz, Cindy MClean 
Clint Conner, Liz McCarthy, Chris 
Brown, Reese McCurdy, Judith Hu- 
don-Senecal, James Wallace and 
1 1. uric Blair. 



Bottom Left: Elaine Blair puts in extra 
time during Homecoming week to 
help create the \n Guild's prize 
winning work of art, a "Sphinx" 
dedicated to Dr. Adams. The fin- 
ished product is displayed aboxe In 

Pat Duke. Li/ McCarthy, Natalie 
I itwinowicz and Robin Sapp. 



Art Guild 189 



Society of Professional Journalists 



The Society of Professional 
Journalists is a national jour- 
nalism organization and is 
the oldest in the country. 
The society helps students 
learn journalism procedures 
and promotes freedom of in- 
formation at local and state 
levels. Membership is based 
on academic standing and 
being a sophomore journal- 
ism major. 

Officers: Joey Knight, Vice-presi- 
dent; Kadi Hendricks, Secretary and 
Steve Murphree, President. 




Row One: Kadi Hendricks, Judy Steve Murphree. Row Two: Kristin Row Three: Randy Scott, Mark Wat- 
Bell, Elizabeth Williams, Pam Mik- Wertz, Paige Rucker, Vicki Hyatt, kins, Kim Wickline, Joey Knight and 
kelson, Susanne Hammonds and Jennifer Childree and Kim Gore. Deanna Baxter. 



190 Society of Professional Journalists 



nTc Math Club 




The Square Root of C Math 
Club provides students the 
opportunity to meet and fur- 
ther cultivate their common 
interest in mathematics. Sev- 
eral activities the Math Club 
participated in include: the 
formation of the third Stu- 
dent Chapter of the Math- 
ematical Association of 
America, the development 
of a mathematics library and a 
drive to fund an annual 
mathematics scholarship. 
The Club also visited the 
Mathematics Laboratory at 
Eglin Air Force Base. 







Top: Officers: Cathy Denny; Vice- 
President, Tiffany McDonald; Secre- 
tary, Denise Taunton; Social Chair- 
man, Brian Cain; Treasurer and Bart 
Hendricks; President. 
Bottom: Members: Dennis Trues- 
dell, Vance Beck, Phillip Sullivan, 



Karen Locke, Sonya Gautney, Dr. 
Lou Destito, Karen Morrow, Kim 
Price, Lisa Hooks, Mrs. Porter, Beth 
Lewis, Carrie Clikas, Kim Rash, The- 
resa Hayes, Nancy Gibson, Delawie 
Smith, Amy Mitchell, Gautam Ad- 
vani, Leslie Battin and Mr. Lee John. 



In "C" Formation: Govind Menon, 
Brian Cain, Tiffany McDonald, Jen- 
nifer Birks, Russell Baldwin, Dr. Jan 
Elrod, Gary Carter, Denise Taunton, 
Mr. James O'Neal and Bart Hen- 
dricks. 






Square Root of C Math Club 191 



Student Nurses Association 



The Student Nurses Asso- 
ciation was established to 
benefit students in the 
School of Nursing program. 
They have a convocation of 
new officers and a pinning 
ceremony for their graduat- 
ing seniors every year. They 
also help with the Blood 
Drive that is sponsored by 
Panellenic and IFC. The 
knowledge they gain being 
involved in the Student 
Nurses Association enables 
these students promising ca- 
reers in the field of Nursing. 








Row One: Mrs. Cathy Dunn, Ms. Michelle Payne, Yvette Jinright, Veatch, Sabina Wilson, Carol 

Nancy Patterson, Kim Kelly, Rhonda Stella Vincent, Tarita Brown, Cathy Tucker, Barbara Matt, Debbie Baker, 

Hayes, Tina Asmussen, and Nancy Mobley, Lynn Padgett and Renee Michelle Gamble, Mary Anne Mon- 

Moore. Row Two: Debbie Barber, Turner. Row Three: Heather crief and Starla Henderson. 



192 Student Nurses Association 



•• 





Opposite Page: Top: Kraig Mitchell 

and Stella Vincent learning proper 

baby holding techniques. 

Top: Two students giving a shot for 

the first time. 

Bottom: Students watch eye exam 

procedures. 



Student Nurses 'V-MHiaiion 193 




Lambda Alpha Epsi 




Jennifer Sohn displays a "prisoner" 
who participated in the LAE Jail Bail 
fundraiser. 



Row One: Anthony Wilson, Wendy 
Bowen, Cindy Blanton, Jennifer 
Sohn and Jon Capps. Row Two: Stan 
Smith, Dr. Charles Jones, Jerry Brox- 



son, Greg Wilkins, Alan Sanders, 
Thomas Manning, Dennis Griffith, 
Freddie Brooks and Kevin Ingalls. 



194 ACEI/Lambda Alpha Epsilon 



DPMA 




DPMA provides students 
the opportunity to learn in- 
formation from members ot 
the data processus commu- 
nity and explore ditterent 
job opportunities. 

Row One: Gary Carter, Sandy 
( ruK hfield, BilK Williams, Sidrlj 

Hudson, Cath\ Everett, \drienne 

Washington, Lionel shipman, Billv 
Callans and Alan Ruud Row Two: 
Mrs. Mary Smith, Mrs. Cindy Carn- 
ley, Kyna McCall, Jolane Smith, Julie 
Thompson, Diana Sobottka, Kim 
Rash, Theresa Hayes, Tammy Yan- 
cey, Paula Powell, Mark Miklos and 
Derek Smith Row Three: Mr Leroy 
Walton, Alex Wright, Jeannie 
Burkes, Rick Montgomery, Brian 
Hall, Kenny Breck, David Rain.-. 
Michael Moore, )oe McCarthy , BilK 
Daniels, Willie Banks, lonathon 
Bradford, Chester Jones, Em A 
liams, Keith Sanders, Tim Meredith, 
and Greg Bryant. 




Delta Sigma Pi 




Delta Sigma Pi is a profes- 
sional business fraternity that 
helps improve the stud\ ot 
business in university stu- 
dents. They receive this im- 
provement by visiting local 
businesses as well as national 
businesses. Delta Sigma Pi's 
annual Spring Fling isalwaysa 
success. 

Row One: Kelle) Simpson, Candice 
Milb\, \my smith Dawn Feitsma. 
Caprice Defalco. Sara Palmer, and 
Rachel Johnson Row Two: Frank 
Mben Kyle Smith, Bryan Wyatl c ai 
Abercromhu- Stace) Mike 

Edwards, Marie Bush and Renee 

kirhs Row Three: \r\d\ Da\is Dev- 
on Snell, Chuck Norris Inns Robin- 
son, Keven Parrish and Ronald Head 






[)PM-\ Delta Sigma Pi 195 



Phi Beta Lambda 



Phi Beta Lambda is a na- 
tional business organization 
to help prepare students for 
careers in business. The 
Goals of Phi Beta Lambda are 
to develop competent lead- 
ership, to strengthen to stu- 
dent's own confidence and 
to promote a better under- 
standing of the American 
business enterprise system 
and to assist the student in 
the establishment of occupa- 
tional goals. 

This year the president of 
Phi Beta Lambda was Don 
Lowery. The advisor was Mr. 
Billy Walters. 




Row One: May French, Nan Mark Miklos, Bart Rodenbaugh and liams, Ira Meredith and Waller Mar- 
Walker, Sherry Odom and Tracy Daniel Dwyer. Row Three: Darren tin. 
Milton. Row Two: Don Lowery, Cannon, Reese McCurdy, Billy Wil- 




Phi Beta Lambda 

A Professional Business Association 



196 Phi Beta Lambda 



HPER 



i* ii ■ i 




HPER is Troy Stale's 
Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation club for edu- 
cation and non-education 
majors and minors. This year 
the HPER dub organized and 
participated in the Special 
Olympics on the area and 
state levels. They also hosted 
the high school state track 
meet which was held on 
campus. The advisors for 
HPER are Ms. Cathy Flynn 
and Mr. Bill Gauspohl. 




HPER i q ~ 



Social Work Konnection 






Left: Members of the Social Work 
Konnection gather outside 
McCartha for a social. 
Bottom Right: Sherrie Wallace and 
Michelle Dozier discuss a social 
work pamphlet to be given out to 
interested students. 
Top: Social Work Konnection 
Members include: Shawanna King, 
Christy Nolan, Monique Wood, Mi- 
chelle Dozier, Heidi Chastain, Ben 
Arellano, Stacey Luck, Sherry Wal- 
lace, Belinda Watson, Clarissa Lam- 
pley and Tawanna Spears. 
198 Social Work Konnection 



ill ^IPI ill 



■111 »*iil ■■■■ £=====^iai 







A pre-professional organi- 
zation for Social Work ma- 
jors, Social Work Konnec- 
tion offers fellowship, educa- 
tion and opportunities for 
service to students in the So- 
cial Work field. Founded 
only one year ago, this club 
has held consistent program 
meetings featuring guest 
speakers in the field. Spouse 
abuse talks and motivational 




speeches were two of the to- 
pics presented by guest 
speakers; among those 
speakers, a Social Worker 
from the Dept. of Human Re- 
sources and a state level so- 
cial worker. Fund raisers, so- 
cials and community service 
projects are also a part of So- 
cial Work Konnection's 
agenda. 



198 Social Work Konnection 



Psi Chi 







Psi Chi is a national honor 
society in phychology. The 
members are psychology 
majors and minors who have 
obtained a 3.2 GPA in the 
area of psychology and a 3.0 
GPA overall. From these re- 
quirements, it is clear that Psi 
Chi emphasizes academic 
acheivement as well as a 
strong knowledge in the 
field of psychology. 

Top: Officers: Cherie Boshcll; 
President, Ginger Piazza; Vice-presi- 
dent and Christina Coates; Secre- 
tary/Treasurer. 



Bottom: Row One: Keith Skelton, 
Dunrey Garven, Sherri Vice, Kari Lo- 
fald. Ginger Piazza and Christina 



Coates Row Two: Elizabeth Yost, 
Patsy Self, Michael Hill, Lori \ eathei - 
ingill, Cherie Boshell and Dr. Pamela 



Manners, ,uK isoi 



Psi Chi 199 






Alpha Psi Omega 












Alpha Psi Omega is an hon- 
or society for outstanding 
students in the dramatic arts. 
In 1988-89, Alpha Psi Omega 
hosted the annual theatre 
banquet which honored 
overall excellence in the dra- 
ma productions of the year. 
Other theatre oriented ser- 
vice projects included selling 
concessions at all TSU the- 
atre productions and enter- 
taining the community with 
various performances. The 
Rotary Club, Exchange Club, 
and Arts Council were 
among those clubs in Troy 
for which Alpha Psi Omega 
performed. Additionally the 
students participated in the 
American College Theatre 
Festival, bringing much hon- 
or and recognition to Troy 
State University. 

Top: Members of Alpha Psi Omega 
for 1989: Row One: Lynne Balducci, 
Karen Hamilton, Amy Hunt, Eliza- 
beth Fowler, Catherine Work and 
Gianna Riley. Row Two: Mack Hill- 
man, Wayne Simpkins, Sam West- 
moreland, C.J. Wilson, Danny Gil- 
roy, Patrick Hall and Todd Lidh. 
Alpha Psi Omega Award Winners for 
1989, Middle Row: Wayne Simpkins, 
Best Actor; Lynne Balducci, Best Ac- 
tress; and C.J. Wilson, Best Support- 
ing Actor. Bottom Row: Margaret 
Byrd Wingate, Best Supporting Ac- 
tress; Catherine Collver, Alpha Psi 
Omega Technical Award Winner; 
and Chris Rich, Alpha Psi Omega 
Scholastic Award Winner. 





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200 Alpha Psi Omega 




Pied Pipers 



The Troy State University 
Pied Pipers have given chil- 
dren across the southeast 
their first taste of live theatre. 
The group was formed in or- 
der to provide additional 
performance opportunities 
for students interested in 
theatre. Selected by audi- 
tion, the Pied Pipers perform 
skits based on traditional 
childrens stories having a 
moral theme. Actors and ac- 
tresses play the familiar roles 
without props or settings. In 
1988-89 children were en- 
tertained at elementary 
schools, arts and craft fairs, 
the National Shrimp Festival, 
the Helen Keller Festival and 
some 50 other perfor- 
mances. 



Row One: Anissa Stewart, Ashle\ 
Mann, Amy Hunt and Kelly Pettis 
Row Two: Gianna Riley, Heather 
Cates, Patrick Hall, Karen Hamilton 
and Elizabeth Fowler Row Three: 
Shoran Hudspeth, Sam Westmore- 
land and Danny Cilroy. Row Four: 
Wayne Simpkins, Michael Gole- 
biewski, C.J. Wilson and Chuck 
Jones. 




Forensics 



Dramatic Duo, After Din- 
ner Speaking, Pursuasive 
Speaking, and Prose Inter- 
pretation are only a few of 
the events in which the Troy 
State Forensics Team com- 
petes. The team is open to 
any student interested in 
speech, acting, or debate. 
More than 75 awards were 
won by the TSU team in their 
many competitions in the 
southeast during 1988-89. 



The 1989 Forensics Team Gianna Ri- 
ley, Yvonne Swell Mai k Hillman. 
Brian Anderson, Sam Westmore- 
land, Todd Lidh, Rosalinda Skeen 
C ) Wilson and Wayne Simpkins 



Pied Pipers Forensics :01 










Baptist Student Union 



Serving everyone from 
summer missionaries to ping 
pong champions, the Baptist 
Student Union strived to 
provide fellowship, fun, and 
opportunities for spiritual 
growth through regular 
weekly activities. "The fel- 
lowship is what makes the 
BSU my home away from 
home," commented Christy 
Curington. "My friends 
there are as close as family." 
Elbert Williams, the campus 
minister was, in fact, known 
as "Uncle Bert". He retired in 
1989 after 19 years of service 
at the BSU. Students com- 
mented that he would be 
greatly missed. 



Row One: Laura Mooney, Jennifer 
Johnson, Michele Shiver, Regina 
Home, Nancy Vass, Christy Curing- 
ton, Ashley Mann and Kim Green. 
Row Two: Candace Hughes, Su- 
sanne Hammond, Tracey Killough, 
Becky Baker, Nan Walker, Marion 
Harris, Penny Lewis, Shoran Hud- 
speth, Sabrina Pugh and Phil 
Weaver. Row Three: Todd Russell, 
Deana Dukes, Troy King, Patsy Self, 
Tronya Gunter, Traci Atchison, Ma- 
rie Harris, Lisa Simpson, Alan Sand- 
ers, Roger McLain, Tim Foster and 
Frank Aiken. Row Four: Elbert Wil- 
liams, Patrick Hall, Jody Shealy, Tra- 
cey Lamb, David Spires, Scott 
Reaves, Angela Rutherford, Stacey 
Coates, Candy Summerlin, Debbie 
Bell, Jim Campbell, Toni Beckman, 
Kevin Goodnight, Angela Blakeley 
and Denise Taunton. 




BSU Council: Row One: Tracey Lamb, Candy Summerlin, Kim Green and 
Angie Rutherford. Row Two: Dwayne Nicholson, Elbert Williams and Phil 
Weaver. Not Shown: Leslie Bennett, Stacey Coates and Debbie Bell. 




H^l 203 



Christian Student Center 



The Christian Student 
Center is a place of warm fel- 
lowship and Bible teaching 
for students sponsored by 
the Church of Christ. Weekly 
activities of the CSC include 
group devotionals, Daily 
Bread classes, prayer break- 
fasts and Bible studies. Other 
activities are retreats, youth 
rallies and seminars. 

Additional CSC fellowship 



opportunities include the 
Drama Troupe, the Acapella 
singing group and social ex- 
cursions such as bowling 
trips. 

Besides cultivating spiritu- 
al growth the CSC strives to 
provide students with op- 
portunities to learn from 
each other as they serve the 
Lord. 





i^W 




tit 4 C^ ■--- J f> 



Top: Troy State students partici- 
pate in a typical Sunday morning Bi- 
ble study. 

Bottom: Students attending the 
CSC include: Row One: Mike Mor- 
row, Jay Cleghorn and Phillip 



Holmes. Row Two: Mary Jones, 
Randal Myers, Patti Myers, Tim Bell, 
Julie Johnson, Bobby Templin, Don 
Lowery, Cissy Kirkland, Mitch Bou- 
ington, Bonnie Buol and Marie 
Johnson. Row Three: Lynn Smelser, 



Kathy Walters, Cheryl Brewer, Holly 
Funk, Elizabeth Miller, Cheryl Chan- 
dler and Amy Sanders. Row Four: 
Joey Murray, Lloyd Conner, John 
Hermann and Jim English. 



204 Christian Student Center 




Left: Randal Myers, director of the 
Christian Student Center, teaches a 
Bible class to TSU students. 
Middle: Lloyd Conner, Randal 
Myers, and Cheryl Chandler make 
plans for a social while DeLynn 
Witcher waits for the Bible study 
class to begin. 



Right: Singing mainly contempo- 
rary Christian music, "Majesty" is an 
outreach ministry of the CSC which 
performs acapella for churches, 
schools and civic groups. Members 
include: Brian Witcher, Mike Mor- 
row, Todd Bostick, Randall Myers 
Joey Murray and Jim English. 



Christian Mudent Center 205 



Wesley Foundation 



The Wesley Foundation 
believes that ministry must 
meet the needs of everyone. 
Because of this belief, there 
are various activities to bal- 
ance social, physical, and 
spiritual needs. Wesley offers 
discipleship and Bible study 
for spiritual growth and 
there are also intramural 
sports for the physical as- 
pect. Besides these things, 
Wesley has retreats, Christian 
speakers, and concerts. The 
Wesley Foundation encour- 
ages using one's talents and 
abilities in the field of minis- 
try. 




Top: A group of friends fellowship 
with one another at the weekly 
meeting. 

Bottom: Students spend their free 
time playing pool and ping-pong at 
th Wesley Foundation. 
Opposite page: Bottom: Officers: 
Debra Aplin-Vice-president, 
Tammy Mauldin-Athletic Director, 
Ruth White-President, Christy 
Clark-Choir Director, Jennifer 
Burkes-Spiritual Life Director, 
Monty Kirkland-Housing Chairman. 




206 Wesley Foundation 












Row One: John Paul Jones and 
Christy Clark. Row Two: Jennifer 
Burkes, Ruth White, Kim Graham, 
Annette Bailey and Monty Kirland. 
Row Three: Leslie Vann, Tammy 
Mauldin, Jimmy Carter, Debra 



Aplin, David Lowrey, Chuck Shep- 
pard and Paul Neuman. Row Four: 
Todd Russell, Morgan Bo\d, Troy 
King, Mark Vanlandingham, Mr. 
Jimmy Jeffcoat and Ladd Lewis. 




Weslej Foundation 207 



Air Force ROTC 




Top: Attaining academic excel- 
lence, Chester Jones, Chris Morgan, 
Eric Stevens, John Tillis and James 
Wooten are honored during Awards 
Night. 



Bottom Left: AFROTC cadets pre- 
sent the colors during a dedication 
ceremony in Pensacola, FL. 
Center: Frank Battistelli receives 
the Outstanding Recruiting Award 
for 1988-89. 




208 Air Force ROTC 




The mission of the Air 
Force ROTC program is to 
educate and commission of- 
ficers for the United States 
Air Force. AFROTC Det. 17 
(TSU) was established in Sep- 
tember 1971. Recently 
named the most improved 
detachment in the Southeast 
area, Det. 17 is ranked as one 
of the best detachments in 
the country. 

The ROTC curriculum in- 
cludes classroom instruction, 
jobs within the corps and a 
weekly one hour leadership 
lab. Cadets are encouraged 
to participate in all college 

Top: The corps and guests meet 
for an "Overseas Night" social to 
hear a talk on various overseas air 
bases, to socialize and to enjoy good 
food. 

Middle Left: "Ultimate Frisbee" and 
other "Sports of the Quarter" are 
played every Thursday in Kilby Field 
by corps members. 



activities and many arc in- 
volved in sororities, fraterni- 
ties, religious orgam/dtions, 
varsity sports and various 
other programs. The detat h- 
ment has its own social life- 
including picnics, dinners 
and parties. 

Two AFROTC programs 
are offered: a four or two 
year program. Students can 
compete for scholarships or 
a tax-free monthly allownace 
of one hundred dollars. Troy 
State University's ROTC ca- 
dets are ready to meet the 
challenge of the future. 



Honored at Awards Night, most of 
the 1988 staff will be leaving Det. 17 
at the end of summer, 1989. The staff 
includes: Lt.Col. Christopher Ryan, 
Major Steven Kranz, Capt. Mark Ea- 
ton, S.Sgt. Willis Walker, Capt. Stan- 
ley Raab, C/Col. Whitney Keese and 
T.Sgt. Frank Hayden. 



Aur Force ROTC 209 



Arnold Air Society 



1 



The Dr. TC Marrs Squad- 
ron of the Arnold Air Society 
at Troy State University is an 
organization of elite 
AFROTC Corps Cadets 
whose purpose is to promote 
and further the goals of the 
US Air Force ROTC and to 
support their community. 

The support is provided in 
the way of service projects, 
joint projects with the auxil- 
iary society of Angel Flight 
and national projects each 
AAS squadron is required to 
participate in. 

Top: Arnold Air Society Officers: 
Row One: Chris Morgan; Com- 
mander, Keena McCall; Public Af- 
fairs, Toby Sears; Comptroller, Misty 
Cosson; Director of Administration 
and Eric Stevens; Director of Oper- 
ations. Row Two: John Tillis; De- 
partment Commander, Fitzi Wil- 
liams; Parlimentarian, Chester Jones; 
Resources, Frank Battistelli; Pledge 
Trainer and Mark Eaton; Captain. 
Bottom: Members: Row One: 
John Tillis, Toby Sears, Whitney 
Keese and Misty Cosson. Row Two: 
Chris Morgan, Keena McCall, 
Charles Polk, Eric Stevens and Frank 
Battistelli. Row Three: Fitzi Williams, 
Chester Jones, Bryce Snider and 
Captain Mark Eaton. 





210 Arnold Air Society 



Angel Flight 




Angel Flight is an active 
service organization spon- 
sor c(J by and focused on pro- 
moting the Air Force ROTC. 
Each year the Angels pride 
themselves on their many 
hours of community service 
and 1989 was no exception. 
Some of the many projc< ts 
they undertook included a 
harvest carnival at the Baptist 
Children's Home, regular 
visits to the Pike Manor 
Nursing Home every first and 
third Tuesday, and help with 
the blood drive. The Angels 
also enjoyed several social 
events such as a formal with 
the Arnold Air Society. 

Top: Angel Flight Officers: Mjr\ 
Parish; Comptroller, Share Riles, 
Pledge Trainer, Sabrina Dutton; Op- 
erations Officer, Julie Sullivant; 
Commander, Donna Tippett; Vice 
Commander, Diane Cease; Public 
Affairs Officer, Marina Gra>, Little 
Major and Vince Powell; Adminis- 
trative Offii ei 

Bottom: Angel Flight Members: 
Row One: Soellc Bouchet, Man La- 
( r\ share Rile\, Marina Cra\ and 
Mary Parish Row Two: Martha Kel- 
ly, Laura Cook, Julie Sullivant. Diane 
Cease, Donna Tippett and Kim Wil- 
son. Row Three: \manda Tucker 
Sandra Brook-. Sabrina Pugh, Ruth 
Rosentrater, Debbie Bell Vince 
Powell, Mist> Cosson and Sabrina 
Dutton. 



*ngel Flight 211 



Trojan Hostesses 



During football season at 
TSU, a group of women de- 
vote their Saturdays to re- 
cruiting potential football 
players. These ladies are the 
official representatives of 
Troy State football, the Tro- 
jan Hostesses. Their purpose 
is to assist the football 
coaches in handling new re- 
cruits, to encourage and sup- 
port the team and, of course, 
to promote school spirit. The 
Hostesses are not only busy 
during Fall quarter but dur- 
ing Winter quarter as well. 
They work with recruits and 
give tours of TSU. 

Trojan Hostesses are se- 
lected by an interview pro- 
cess and the organization is 
open to all TSU ladies. 




t . 




Top: Members of the Trojan Host- 
esses include: Row One: Laura 
Sanders, Audrey Merrill, Gina Grary, 
Susan McWhorter and Angela Pugh 
with Coach Mike O'Toole. Row 
Tow: Jodi Shank, Suzi Romans, Joy 



Jones, Christy King, Cathy Turber- 
ville and Sandy Crutchfield. Row 
Three: Angela Evans, Debbie Barber, 
Sherri King, Becca Walden and Su- 
san Miller. 



Bottom Left: Kelly Coe makes Troy 

State very appealing to a potential 

recruit. 

Bottom Right: Hostesses on the job 

during Homecoming. 



212 Trojan Hostesses 



ACUB 




The Adams ( enter Union 
Board, -\( I B, works to pro- 
vide a variety of entertain- 
ment and activities for Troy 
St.ite students. \ or the prh e 
of a program sticker which 
students may purchase at the 
beginning of each quarter, 
students ( an enjoy big name 
concerts, Wednesday nighl 
movies, and many other 
tournaments and activities. 
Cheap Trick appeared in 
concert Fall of 1988 compli- 
ments of ACUB, and Chicago 
entertained students Winter 
Quarter of 1989. In addition 
to such professional enter- 
tainment, ACUB helped stu- 
dents become directK in- 
volved through pool tourna- 
ments, a step-sing and the 
"Roommate Game." 

Top: The Adams Center L nion 
Board: Jenny Martin; Public it . 
Knight; Vice-Chairman, Emily 
Dever; Special Activities and Anne- 
marie Bell; Union Programming Not 
Shown: ]etf Preston.Chairman, Tony 
Robinson; Secretary and Adam 
Byrd; Movies. 






Bottom Left: Emily Dever heads up 
plans for the next ACUB tourna- 
ment. 

Bottom Right: |oey Knight files in- 
formation for the Board to consider 
upon their next meeting 



■\( I B 213 



Tropolitan 




Printing news, sports 
scores, opinions and pizza 
coupons, the Tropolitan 
seeks to inform students, 
staff and administration of 
campus events and issues. 
The student newspaper is 
published every Thursday for 
TSU students. All writing, 
editing, layout, paste-up, 



typesetting and selling of ad- 
vertisements is done by Troy 
State students. The Tropoli- 
tan provides practical exper- 
ience for student journalists 
by giving them an introduc- 
tion to news reporting, edit- 
ing, photography and the 
mechanical aspects of the 
newspaper. 



The Tropolitan Staff: Row One: 

Vicki Hyatt, Beverly Aland, Kristina 
Lawrence, Deana Baxter, Jodi Shank 
and Cindy Tisdale. Row Two: Mark 
Watkins, Joey Knight, Debbie 
McGill, Kim Wickline, Michael 
Wickersheim and John Sullivan. 



214 Tropolitan 







Tropolitan 21S 



Trojan Ambassadors 



Begun in 1983 as the offi- p By 

cial group of university hosts, r ^^' ' 

The Trojan Ambassadors are S 

twenty students who serve as 
tourguides for campus visi- 
tors; as ushers for various 
programs on campus; and as 
assistants to the Chancellor 
and First Lady for the Home- 
coming reception. 

The Trojan Ambassadors 
also entertain prospective 
students and their parents 
during campus visitations, 

particularly on Saturday mmm 

mornings. *■»•■* lfcO.4^ 

Ambassadors serve one- f| 

year terms, and new mem- S, 

bers are selected by applica- II 

tion and interview each 
spring. l i|l 





Top: Trojan Ambassadors for 1988- 
89: Row One: Van English, Sponsor; 
Gretchen Crim, Teresa McKinney, 
Annemarie Bell and Julie Thorp. 
Row Two: Leslie Anne Jones, Liz 
Williams, Debbie McGill and Sherrie 
Wallace. Row Three: Scott Buff, 
President; Vince Stansbury, Jeff 
Moon, Michael Jones and Neal 
Nash, Treasurer. Not Shown: Jim 
Norton, Vice President; Greg Willis, 



George Lee, Ken Elder, Leslie Og- 
den, Muffy Edleberg and Brian Cain. 
Left and Right: Hosting the Adam's 
reception following the Homecom- 
ing game, Jim Norton and Anne- 
marie Bell exhibit their public rela- 
tion skills while Sherrie Wallace, Mi- 
chael Jones and Julie Thorp serve 
refreshments to students, faculty 
and guests. 




216 Trojan Ambassadors 



College Republicans 



It-It Tommy Clark and Berklev 
Smith disc uss a new proposal for the 
formal of Troy's College Republi- 
cans. 

Top Right: Oltut-rs Row One: 
Tommy Clark; Promotions and Ed 
Sullivan; Vice-Chairman. Row Two: 
Berkely Smith; Secretary, Dave But- 
ton; Chairman and Belinda Russnik, 
Treasurer. 







Bottom Member! In< lude Row 
One: red Sullivan, Bob Rice, tommy 

( l.irk, Matt Mingus, Daw Button 
Billy Daniels, Paul Smith, Eric Ben- 
nett and Br ut i- VN illis Row Two: An- 
gela Mammons, Tammy (ones, 
Shoran Hudspeth, Belinda Russmck 
and Berkely Smith Row Three: Lau- 
ra Sanders, Sonya Eortune and 
Christy Brooks 







\\r - 


H"i 



Increasing its membership 
from 10 in 1987 to 72 in 1988, 
the College Republicans un- 
derwent a complete turn 
around in 1988-89. Most of 
the interest in College Re- 
publicans was fed by the 
Presidential election, Presi- 
dent Bush being a Republi- 
can, of course. Rewriting the 
College Republican Consti- 
tution for the Troy State 
chapter and participating in 
national, state, and local 
elections were only two of 
the many activities in which 
TSU College Republicans 
were involved. Additionally 
the organization boasted of 
the candidacy of two Troy 
State students in the State 
College Republicans Elec- 
tions, Susan Carroll for Chair- 
man and Dave Britton for 
Vice-Chairman. 






College Republicans 213 



University 




The University Dancers are 
a group of hardworking 
young women who must au- 
dition to be selected as a 
dancer. After being selected, 
the girls practice twice a 
week for programs and an 
annual show that is per- 
formed for all the students 
on campus. The advisor for 
the group is Ms. Beverly Fil- 
lingam. 




Top: Dancers practising a routine 
that requires synchronicity. 
Bottom left: Practise makes perfect. 



Row one: Danielle Warren, Jennifer Roach. Row three: Suzanne Adams, 

Childree, Felicia Pierce and Mary Melanie Connell, Kelly Thurlow and 

Beth Vaughn, Row two: Angie Per- Jennifer Dykema. 
ry, Mary Elkins, Ashley Mann and Jill 



218 University Dancers 



Tau Beta Sigma 




Tau Beta Sigma is a national 
band fraternity for women 
whose purpose is to promote 
achievement and excellence 
in music and to serve the 
Sound of the South band in 
every capacity. In 1988-89, 
the Tau Beta Sigma women 
started the school year by 
sponsoring several parties for 
the band including one for 
Freshmen and one at Hallow- 
een. During Winter Quarter 
the new pledges were in- 
ducted and Tau Beta Sigma 
hosted the district band con- 
test and band clinic and also 
attended the district con- 
vention. Spring Quarter, the 
Fraternity's main project was 
the hosting of the State Five 
Day Band clinic held at Troy 
State. 

Officers: Donna Fraler; Secretary, 
Paige Morrow; President, Michelle 
Moultrie; Vice President and Debra 
Smith; Warden. 



Members: Row One: Paige Mor- 
row, Wendy Powell, \anc\ Kirbv 
Tammv Jordan and Susan Suther- 
land Row Two: Donna Frater, De- 
bra Smith, Shona Barton, Tammy 
Brunson, Noelle Bouchet, Beth 
Cobb, Ann Anuszewski and Donna 
Dyal. Row Three: Michelle Moul- 
trie Kathleen i oPresti, Lovina 
yer, Leslie Bankston and Pebley 
Fuller. 



Tau B«mj Sigma 2~\<) 



Phi Mu Alpha 



P 



m* 






& 



* 



Promoting the high stan- 
dards of creativity, perfor- 
mance and research in 
American Music, Phi Mu Al- 
pha is a professional music 
fraternity open to anyone in- 
terested in music. The broth- 
ers join with the other music 
organizations at Troy State 
University to make the music 
programs successful. Besides 
serving the music depart- 
ment on campus, Phi Mu Al- 
pha performs for various au- 
diences on and off campus. 
Two such public perfor- 
mances included a concert at 
Sorrell Chapel in May and a 
concert at the jean Lake Arts 
Festival. Parties, cookouts, 
softball games, banquets, 
formals, and workshops are 
also a part of Phi Mu Alpha's 
agenda. 

Top: 1988-89 Members of Phi Mu 
Alpha: Row One: Rob Ivey, John 
Paul Jones and Scott Yeilding. Row 
Two: Don Allen, Greg Shaw, and 
Stanton Kelley. Row Three: Mike 
Moore, John Weith and Jason An- 
derson. Row Four: John Richard, 
Michael Jones and Mark Vanlan- 
dingham. 

Bottom: Phi Mu Alpha brothers 
Michael Jones and Stanton Kelley 
sell concessions at a Collegiates con- 
cert. 



■5** 



?! I 



; 



•*»v 



220 Phi Mu Alpha 







Rob Ivey and Greg Shaw discuss 
plans for the upcoming formal to be 
held with the sisters of SAI. 






phi n.uj Mpha ::i 



Sigma Alpha lota 



Sigma Alpha lota is an in- 
ternational music fraternity 
for women which strives for 
excellence in furthering, es- 
tablishing, and maturing the 
musical talets of its sister- 
hood. The fraternity serves 
the Troy State music depart- 
ment by volunteering for 
parts in the spring musical, 
selling concessions, and ush- 
ering at various perfor- 
mances in Smith Hall. Addi- 
tionally, the sisters raise 
money for their philanthro- 
pies which are national music 
organizations such as the 
Braile Music School, perform 
a spring musical, participate 
in various concerts, and join 
with their brother fraternity 
Phi Mu Alpha in service and 
social activities. 

Top: 1988-89 Members of Sigma Al- 
pha lota: Row One: Christy Clark, 
Tina Hicks, Cassie Chestnut, Jennifer 
Birks, Yvonne Sweat, Kelly Laroche, 
Leslie McGinty and Nadine Pitts. 
Row Two: Scott Yielding- Sweet- 
heart, Cindy Kobet, Elizabeth Yost, 
Cyndi Sallas and Christina Tyler. 
Row Three: Lisa Lewis, LeAnn Har- 
bin, Jeannie Birks, Robin Gartman, 
Dayna Ellis, Mrs. Mary Mims and 
Kelly Mills. 

Bottom Left: Officers: Row One: 
Cassie Chestnut, Alumni Secretary; 
Jennifer Birks, Treasurer; Yvonne 
Sweat, Social Chairman; and Kelly 
Laroche, Parliamentarian. Row Two: 
Cindy Kobet, President; Elizabeth 
Yost, Vice President; Cyndi Sallas, 
Secretary; and Christina Tyler, Edi- 
tor. Now Shown: Tiffany McDonald, 
Chaplain. 

Bottom Right: Robin Gartman, 
Dayna Ellis and Jeannie Birks re- 
hearse for their upcoming concert. 




222 Sigma Alpha lota 








The sisters of SAI are encouraged to 
establish and mature their musical 
talents. Yvonne Sweat, LeAnn Har- 
bin and Christy Clark, above, and 
Scott Yielding and Dayna Ellis, be- 
low, exhibit their wide range of tal- 
ents as they prepare to entertain at 1 
public recital in Sorrell Chapel. 



Sigma Alpha lota 223 










Collegiate Singers 



For Troy State students 
who sing, the Collegiate 
Singers is an excellent op- 
portunity to be involved. 

The Collegiates present a 
major concert each quarter. 
Their 1988-89 season con- 
sisted of the Fall Sing in No- 
vember, Requiem by Rutter 
and Gloria by Vivaldi in 
March and the Spring Pops 
Concert in April. Additional- 
ly, the Singers performed at 
various other formal func- 
tions such as the dedication 
ceremony of the Dorothy K. 
Adams Center. 



Collegiate Singers: Jason Grace, 
Don McGee, Ken Maraman and 
Ladd Lewis make up the group 
called "Flashbacks" which has per- 
formed at the past two Spring Pops 
Concerts. 




Collegiate Singers: Row One: Don 
McGee, Michael Jones, Rob Ivey, 
Brian Sikes, David Spires, Phil 
McLaney, John Weith, Chris Dendy, 
Ladd Lewis, Kurt McCall, Jim Camp- 
bell, Jody Shealy, Michael Moore 
and Barry Frost. Row Two: Phrann 
McGilroy, Tracy Hughes, Becky Ba- 
ker, Linna Buice, Elizabeth McCar- 
thy, Tiffany McDonald, Jeff Hartley, 
Bill Gunter, Ken Maraman, Jason 
Anderson, Stanton Kelley and Ricky 
Baker. Row Three: Catherine 



Collver, Lisa Skeen, Penny Lewis, 
LeAnn Harbin, Trina Anderson, Elna 
Hancock, Devi Waldrop, Nan Walk- 
er, Tamara Boyd, Kimberly Graham, 
Betsy White, Lisa Robinson, Mi- 
chelle McEwan and Jennifer Birks. 
Row Four: Cindy Henderson, Cara 
English, Cheryl Dyess, Roxanne 
Simpson, Amiee Pope, Emily Dever, 
Kathleen Lopresti, Lynn Smelser, 
Christy Clark, Cassie Chestnut, Sonja 
Harrell and Leslie Vann. 



Kimberly Graham was one of the 
several soloists to perform at the 
Spring Pops Concert. 



224 Collegiate Singers 



Madrigal Singers 




Selected by audition only, 
the Madrigal Singers are a 
special ensemble of Troy 
State students who combine 
the talents of singing and 
dancing to entertain others. 
Besides performing in an on 
campus concert each quar- 
ter, the Madrigals have sev- 
eral tours during the school 
year including a Christmas 
tour to various surrounding 
high schools, touring en- 
gagements with the Colle- 
giate Singers, and perfor- 
mances at various clubs and 
community organizations in 
the Troy area. A favorite at 
the Spring Pops Concert, the 
Madrigals performed num- 
bers including a version of 
The Battle Hymn of the Re- 
public done with sign lan- 
guage. 



Top Left: "Ain't Misbehavin "' was 
one of the numbers performed by 
the Madrigal singers at the Spring 
Pops Concert. 

Bottom Right: 1988-89 Madrigal 
Singers: Ken Maraman, Becky Baker. 
Randall Ledkins, Michelle McEwan, 
Jason Grace, Betsy White, Michael 
Jones, Cassie Chestnut, Jeff Hartle\ 
and Lisa Lewis. 






Bottom Left: Michael Jones and Cas- 
sie Chestnut entertain Troy State 
students with a "Show Business" 



medley featuring their own original 
choreography. 



Madrigal SingCfl 




226 Band 



OF THE SOUTH 





Band 227 




Top Right: Feature Twirlers: Joseph 
Wood and Hether Caskill. 
Top Left: Percussion: Brad Caprara, 
Eric House, Jeff Miller, Dean Alex- 
ander, Richard Shera, Thee Dasher, 
Rick Montgomery, Jeff Coslan, Dan- 
ny Taylor, Brian Henry, Kent Mor- 
row, Mark Alexander, Jeff Strouse, 
Chuck Pennington, Paul Henley, 
Tammy Brunson, Mary Ann Pea- 
cock, Leslie Bankston, Lessie 
Cowart, Sherry Bodiford, Lynn 
Price, Clarissa Lamply, Ken Gaines, 
Leo Miller, Andre Burgess, Lionel 
Shipman, Xavier Wallace, Ken 
Merker, Todd Cleckler, Tim Bowen, 
Joseph Ciambor, Scott Reynolds, 
Tony Robinson and John Cannon. 
Bottom Left: Baritones and Trom- 
bones: Top to Bottom: Doug Bell, 
Mark Vanlandingham, Mack Wat- 
kins, Kelvin Pless, David Smith, Jeff 
Fowler, John Paul Jones, Stanton 
Kelley, Joe Hughes, Jim Fitzpatrick, 



Don Allen, Lyndon Isaac, Martin 
Carter, Dennis Kirby, Kevin Payne, 
David Newsome, Ken Terrell, Mark 
Howard, Michael Wickersheim, 
Holly Matthews, Mary Lacey, Don 
Aplin and Ben Mallory. 
Center Right: Clarinets: Clockwise 
from Bottom Center: Meg Gunn, 
Elizabeth, Miller, Ann Anuszewski, 
Bruce Steptoe, Kevin Cleckler, Gil- 
bert, Bonce, Terry, Bass, Angela, 
Hampton, Kathleen LoPresti, Tay 
Wood, Theresa, Smith, Renna Wills, 
Teresa, Fish, Melissa Watson, Krista 
Tuberville, Valerie Bass, Tomi Har- 
kins, Donna Frater, Donna Dyal, 
Heather, Martin, Linda Stokley, Janis 
Spooner, Pebley Fuller. 
Bottom Right: Saxaphones: Bottom 
to Top: LeeAnn Harbin, Eric Wil- 
liams, Douglas Russell, Denise Mur- 
phy, Elilzabeth Kenty, Stanley Dix- 
on, Paige Morrow, Kevin Carter, and 
Nancy Kirby. 




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Top Left: Majorettes: Row One: 

Heather Gaskill, Lisa Rolling, Tammy 
Jordan and Joseph Wood. Row Two: 
Michelle Krist, Stephanie Sterns, 
Kim Knight, Lainie Fowler, Susan 
Sutherland. Row Three: Paula 
Lowery, Jamie Renfro, Kim McCall, 
Marci Little, Lasinda Harris, Sherry 
McCormick and Carol Ann Lovvorn. 
Row Four: Angie Grantham, Natalie 
McCurdy, Nicole Shewmake, 
Rhonda Hawk, Jeannie Hewett, Re- 
nee Kirby, Jodi Campbell, Chere 
Williams and Lisa Boutwell. Row 
Five: Rhonda Smith, Stephanie Mat- 
thews, Julie Waters, Bronda Garrett, 
Lynn Padgett, Leslie Padgett, Dee 
Dee Hughes, Dawn Feitsma and 



Monica Hasley. Top Right: Flags: 
Row One: Jennifer Birks, Dayna Ellis, 
Gina Nelson, Robin Gartman and 
Jeannie Birks. Row Two: Lee Ellis, 
Michelle Isabell, Shannon O'Con- 
nor, Kim Turner, Elizabeth Yost, La- 
vonia Johnson, Tammy Lee, Nadine 
Pitts, Cassandra Chestnut and Holly 
Vann. Row Three: Jana Lamberth, 
Anita Golden, Annette Golden, Mi- 
i helle Moultrie, Becky Daker, Kipp 
Butler, Noelle Bouchet, Donna Tip- 
ped, Kimberly Wilson, Amy Mitch- 
ell, Regina Boykin and Leslie Vann- 
CentCl Leftl Mellophones: Row 
One: Kelly Mills, Kim Robbins, 
Shawn Greenlee Karon R.id/ik and 
Beth Padgett. Row Two: Holly 



Floyd, Deborah Goerzen, Kirk kcl- 
gore, Debra Smith, Cissy Kirkland 
and Susan Story. Center Rik;ht Tu- 
bas: Aaron Columna, Sherrv Holmes, 
Chris Pugh, Lauren Carper, Rust\ 
Starcher, Dean Barrow, John Weith. 
Quentin Brown, Adam Townscnd, 
Paul Johnston, Kevin McKee, John 
McCall and Tommy Seay. Bottom 
Left Piccolos: Row One: KimberK 
Waller, Leslie McGinty, Christina 
T\ler, Sandy Cook, Tina Hardin \ .il- 
erie Ohman, Beth Cobbs and Renee 
Frederick Row Two: Tnn.i Ander- 
son, Shona Barton, Lovina Sawyer, 
Cyndi Sallas, Lon Maxwell, Diane 
( ease, Laura Hunter, Wend\ Pens ell 
and KelK Laroche. Bottom Rit;ht 



Trumpet*: Row One: David Turk, 
Christopher Webster, Randy 

Blocker Britt Patter-on Kevin 

Daughert) ^ngie Mart) Mien 

Karen 1 oc ke Chink Floyd, Charles 
Poke, John Powers and Mitchell 
Bouington Row Tow: Ondv K 
Susan Mac k C hnsts Clark, Rob \\ e\ 

( In is Colapietro left I lib f vern 

Williams. Sam Smith, Linna B 
Chuck franklin and Christopher 
Cemme Row Three: Rusts Cour- 
son, Brian Witchei \ernon Wil- 
liams, Jason Snderson John Richard, 
Ronnie Wiggins (,reg ShlM Eddie 
suns Glenn Fuqua, Jell -\usborn, 
lack Williams (rank Stiles Chuck 

Neel) and s c otl Yeilding 












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5 






Troy State Band 



It's halftime at a Troy State 
football game. From the 
pressbox comes that familiar 
voice announcing the band 
which students and fans so 
expectantly wait to hear; 
Troy State's pride- "The 
Soouund of the Soouuth!" 
Under the direction of Dr. 
John Long and Drum Major 
Chris Walker, the marching 
band sweeps across the field 
playing TSU students' favor- 
ite band tune, "Dixie." 

During the 1988-89 school 
year, this scene was re-en- 
acted several times, always to 
the applause, shouts and 
whistles of the audience. 
However, Memorial Stadium 
was not the only place The 
Sound performed. Their 
itenerary included perfor- 
mances at the Central Florida 
game in Orlando, the Jack- 
sonville State game and nu- 
merous parades and contests 
in Enterprise, Dothan and 
other towns. Yet the high- 
lights of the year were un- 
doubtedly the trip to Tampa 
Bay to play for the Bucaneers 
and to Washington D.C. to 
participate in the Inaugural 
parade. 

The Sound not only boast- 
ed such honors as these ap- 
pearances, but also of the 
continuing academic excel- 
lence among band members. 
According to Dr. Long and 
Dr. Adams, the Sound of the 
South with it's high achievers 
and memorable perfor- 
mances truly was "Number 
One" in 1988-89. 








230 Band 




Opposite Page: Top. TSU majorettes 
add grace to downtown Troy during 
the Homecoming parade. 
Bottom: Sophomore Susie Jones 
keeps time with the other color 
guards. 



This Page: Top: John Mike McCall, 
Rusty Starcher and Chris Pugh con- 
centrate on their music. 
Bottom Left: Dr. )ohn M. Long dir- 
ects the band as they play for the 



chancellor and students on "Thanks 
Dr. and Mrs. Adams" Day 
Bottom Right: Drum major Chris 
Walker demonstrates his skill in 
keeping the Band in step. 















m 



Band 231 




232 Greeks 




Greeks 



The Greek life is a life where the unexpected can be expected. The events of 
Greek life range from social theme parties to fund raising for national philanthropy 
projects. 

Greeks are also actively involved in all campus activities as well. From holding 
offices in organizations, to striving for academic excellence, "brothers" and "sis- 
ters" always lend a helping hand whenever needed. 

The Greek experience offers an active college life as well as lasting impressions. 




Lisa Palmisano 
Section Editor 



Derek Brown 
Heath DeRamus 
Cara English 
Tim Jacobs 
Ed Moseley 
Donald Norsworthy 
Photographers 



Kyle Smith 

Michelle Waddington 

Contributing Editors 








Squeal Day is fantastic when a soror- 
ity gets the girls they've rushed hard 
all week. 



I 






I 






234 Rush 




-J 



Alf* 



A 4 



> 



1 





'S% ' 



L 



Center: Phillip Cilley and Paige Top: Supporting their fawit 

Rucker discuss the meaning of lite' rontv, Alpha Cam big brothers stand 

Bottom: Chi Omega pledges already with Gretchen Crim waiting tor the 

love the Creek life! pledges to "squeal!" 



U 



Rush 235 



Hours of Rush workshop, hardwork and pa 
tience provide final proof of . . . 







roy State University so- 
rorities enjoyed another 
successful rush this fall 
with more than 190 girls 
receiving bids to join so- 
rorities. 

"Our numbers were 
well distributed," said 
Miss Patterson, director of 
Housing and Creek affairs. 
"We had 218 girls start the 
rush week and we 
pledged 193, so there were 
not as many girls dropped this 
year as in the past years." 

For the first time on TSU 
campus, quota, which is the 
total possible girls a sorority is 
allowed to pledge was set at 
42. In the past quota averaged 
around 34 to 35 girls. 

Another day was added to 
rush this year, called Panhel- 
lenic Day. Sorority members 
were permitted to wear only 
simple jersey and jeans outfits 
with no elaborate costumes 
or skits allowed during the 
party. The day was added to 
help rushees and sorority 
members to get to know ea- 
chother better and to pro- 
mote the Greek system. 

After Panhellenic rush end- 
ed, rush for the Delta Sigma 
Theta sorority began. Ac- 
cording to Kyna McCall, 
president of DST, the differ- 
ences between their rush and 
the Panhellenic rush were 
many. 

The Deltas hold rush after 
classes begin, while the five 
Panhellenic sororities have 
rush before classes start. A girl 
must be a sophomore with at 
least a 2.5 gpa to pledge Delta 
Sigma Theta, while a fresh- 
man with a 2.0 gpa may 
pledge a Panhellenic sorority. 




The Kappa Delta sisters are ready for 
the rushees to come through the 
door. 



236 Greeks 



Rush is a unique exper- 
ience for anyone who has the 
opportunity to experience it. 
Think for a second. You are 
an incoming freshman. You 
know nothing about college 
life. The only people on cam- 
pus you know are a few guys 
that live near you in the 
dorm, and maybe some guys 
you graduated with in high 
school. You finally get all of 
your junk moved in your 
room, and you have nothing 
to do. So you wander aim- 
lessly around for a while and 
you see some papers stuck to 
the wall of the dorm. The pa- 
pers are inviting you to rush 
parties at some of the Frater- 
nity houses. 

You are now walking up to 
one of the houses, carrying 
butterflies in your stomach. 
When you walk in the door 
you are greeted by someone 
that sticks a name tag on your 
shirt. You talk to him for a 
while and he introduces you 
to someone else, who then 
introduces you to a few more 
people. After a while you 
know half of the people in 
the house, but you can't re- 
member a single name. You 
do this at two or three houses 
in a night, and you think you 
know half of the campus, but 
you still can't remember any 
names. In that one night you 
have learned how to relate 
with other people. Rush is 
not only a time to meet peo- 
ple and decide which frater- 
nity you want to join, but it is 
also a time for growth and 
development in human rela- 
tions. This is why everyone 
should experience Fraternity 
rush. 





Bottom: The pledges come running 
out of Shackleford looking for their 
new sorority. 



Top: Micheal Cavanaugh and Chuck 
Boggs support the other's fraternity. 



238 Rush 






Top: Hiding in the shadows during 
rush, Rho Chis Kim Gore, Lynn Bal- 
ducci and Ginger Piazza help the ru- 
shees during rush week. 



Bottom Left: Standing in line, the Bottom Right: Phi Mu pledge 
rushees talk about the different rush Marisa Ridgeway hugs Stac i Pi-< c i 
parties. Trios .ire good Friends already. 



Rush 239 



Alpha D.li.! Pi 

ANDREWS. CEMIRA 

ARD, PAM 

ARD, TRACEY 

BACKENSTO, PATTY 

BAGLEY, TINA 

BAKER, TRACI 

BARFIELD, AMANDA 

BATTIN, LESLIE 

BRADY, IENNI 

BREWER, EMILY 

BURKES, JAYMIE 

CLAWSON, MICHELLE 

CORLEY, LISA 

DAVIS, MELANIE 

DAVIS, SHARON IO 

EADY, RENEE 

EVANS, AMY 

FAIRCLOTH, ANDI 

FAISON, SHAWN 

FIVIAN, MICHELLE 

FLOWERS, LISA 

GOODWIN, PAM 

GREEN, RISA 

GRISSETT, LINDA 

HALLEY, JULIE 

HARRINGTON, GARYN 

HART, JILL 

HASTINGS, KIM 

JACKSON, JANE 

JOHNSON, JANET 

JOHNSON, KERRI 

KEEL, ALYSON 

KELLEY, KIM 

LANDERS, FRAN 

LANDRUM, SLATER 

LAVERCOMBE, JILL 

MARKERT, AMY 

MCCLELLAN, CARA 

MITCHELL, AMY 

MOCK, DANA 

MORROW, KAREN 

PALMER, SARA 

PANTON, JEN 

PHILPOT, BEVERLY 

PRIDGEN, SHERRI 

QUINN, ZAN 

RAINES, AMY 

SEERY, EDEN 

SENN, CAMILLE 

SHIVER, KANDICE 

SLATTERY, ERIN 

SMITH, LONNA 

SPRAGUE, LISA 

STEPHENSON, SHEA 

SULLIVAN, MONICA 

TARVIN, CINDY 

TAYLOR, LISA 

THOMPSON, TONYA 

TRAVIS, MARCO 

TROMBETTA, MELANIE 

TROMBETTA, MOLLY 

TURNER, AMY 

VENABLE, CAMERON 

VISCO, LISA 

WEATHERFORD, BETH 

WELLS, KAROL 

Alpha Gamma Delta 

ABBOTT, KEELY 

ANDERSON, MONICA 

BAKER, KIM 

BELL, ANNEMARIE 

BENNETT, TRACI 

BOWERS, LEIGH 

BOWES, BECKY 

BRANNON, LIZ 

BROWN, MIMI 

BURKE, ALECIA 

BUSH, MARIE 

CASSADY, JERILYN 

CARPENTER, LISA 

CLECKLER, DANI 

CLIKAS, CARRIE 

CROZIER, TERESA 

DEAVOR, KIM 

DUFFY, MARY 



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POWELL, PAULA 

PRICE, KELLEY 

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ROBINSON, LISA 

ROSENQUIST, TRACY 

RUCKER, PAIGE 

RUSSELL, STEPHANIE 

SAULS, BELLAMIE 

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SEXTON, MICHELLE 

SIRMON, LISA 

SMITH, KIM 

SPENCE, RACQUEL 

STEELE, SUZANNE 

STONE, LISA 

STRAUGHN, CHRISTY 

TAYLOR, DALISIA 

TAYLOR, LAINIE 

THOMAS, BETSY 

THORPE, JULIE 

TILLMAN, LORI 

WALLACE, SHERRY 

WERTZ, KRISTIN 

WILLIAMSON, YVETTE 

WRIGHT, TOBY 

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ADAMS, WADE 

BATES, RICHARD 

BLACK, RALPH 

BOGGS, CHUCK 

BRISLIN, RICHARD 

CAPPS, HENRY 

CLARK, DOWE 

CRAWFORD, JAMES 

CRISP, LARRY 

DWYER, DANIEL 

EDWARDS, DAN 

ELLISON, JAMES 

GANN, JAMES 

GILLEY, PHILLIP 

GREEN, MARK 

HEFNER, SCOTT 

HOLLEY, JOHN 

JEFFREY, CHRIS 

KELLEY, BURTRAM 

KNIGHT, JOE 

KOCH, BRAD 

LONG, JEFF 

LUNN, DALE 

MADDOX, MICHAEL 

MATHEWS, JAMES 

MCDOWELL, BRAD 

MEEK, PATRICK 






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KANTOR, GRETA 

KELLY. LISA 

KETCHAM, MITZI 

LEHMAN, LAURA 

LETSON. LORI 

LEWIS, BETH 

LEWIS, LISA 

LIVINGSTON, TAMMY 

LOTT, JANET 

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REEVES, STEPHANIE 

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REYNOLDS, KITTY 

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ROTEN, LISA 

RUSH, MICHELLE 

RUSNAK, BELINDA 

SHEPARD, MELANIE 

SNOW, SUZANNE 

STABLER, KATHLEEN 

STEARNS, STEPHANIE 

STREETS, SHERYL 

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TICE, KENDRA 

V1CKERY, CHRISTY 

WALKER, KRISTI 

WARREN, CINDY 

WATSON, MELISSA 

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WHITEHEAD, RHONDA 

WILLIAMS, LIZ 

WILSON, SHARLA 

WIX, SHANNON 

WOODHAM, KRYSTAL 

WOODHAM, SAMANTHA 

WORD, LEIGH ANN 

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ALSUP. KEVIN 

BARNES, ROBBIE 

BENNETT, TREY 

BRYANT, DAVID 

CAPSTRAW, JASON 

CARPENTER, SCOTT 

CARROLL, KEVIN 

COLE, LANCE 

COTTON, JEFF 

COTTINGHAM, GENE 

CUTLER, ALLEN 

DENDY, CHRIS 

FEITZMA, DAVID 

FLEENER, ANDY 

GILL, BURT 

HARDEN, DALE 

HEITNER, MARK 

HOUGH, RANDY 

KIMBROUGH, JAMES 

KIRKLAND, BRETT 

LAMB, PAT 

LAMBURT, BRAIN 

LARSON, JIM 

MCDOWELL, ROB 

MCGEE, DON 

MITCHELL, SCOTT 

MURDOCK, JIM 

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OTT, BROOKS 

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CHILDS. GREG 

COOK, JEFF 

DODSON. BOB 

DORMER. CHARLIE 

DORSEY, DAVID 

DYKE, RICHARD 

ELMORE, GARY 

FOLGER, CHAD 

GAUSS, STEPHEN 

GREEN, ROBERT 

IACOBS, RICHIE 

IOHNSON, (OHNNY 

IOHNSON, TODD 

KUNT7, BUI 

LAMKIN, BILL 

LAVENDER, JIM 

LEWIS, |OEY 

LIVINGSTON, ED 

MAXWELL, FRANK 

MAYNE, DON 

MURPHEE, STEVE 

MUSSLER, ED 

NICHOLS, PHIL 

NORRIS, CHUCK 

POTTS, JOE 

PRICE, TROY 

RIDGWAY, BRAIN 

ROBERTS, VIC 

RUSHING, JEFF 

RUUD, ALAN 

SCRUGGS, BRYAN 

SHAMBURGER, STEVE 

SHEILDS, JOE 

SHETTER, MIKE 

SIKES, BRIAN 

SMITH, ALAN 

SNYDER, GLENN 

TISDALE, JEFF 

TORTOR1CE, CHAD 

WATERS, FRED 

WATLEY, THEO 

WEATHERFORD, BRAD 

WIGGINS, RONNIE 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

ADAMS, ROBERT 

ATKINS, TONY 

BAGLEY, TIM 

BECK, VANCE 

BLAIR, DONALD 

BLEDSOE, MICHAEL 

BOYETT, RONNIE 

CHAPMAN, SID 

CLARK, DAVID 

CLARK, TOM 

COOPER, STACY 

DICESARE, FRANK 

DIMISA, JOE 

ELLSWORTH, RON 

FINLATER, JOHN 

FOLMER, JASON 

GODWIN, WILLIAM 

GRICE, JOHN 

GWIN, DEAN 

HICE, RICHARD 

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HUDSON, DAVID 

HYCHE, KEVIN 

KNOTTS, MARK 

KUMMEL, CARL 

LAGER, SEAN 

LEE, DANNY 

LOWERY, CARMI 

LOYED, JIM 

MANNING, MARK 

MCCALL, CHRIS 

MCCRACKEN, CHRIS 

MCCRARY, CARSON 

MCFAY, CLEVE 

MCKINNON, MIKE 

MIKLOS, MARK 

MINGUS, MATT 

MULLINS, RONNIE 

MURPH, JAMES 

NEWMAN, ROB 

OWENS, MARCUS 

PANTON, TOM 




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WEHNER, ROGER 

WELCH, TIM 

WILKES, CHRIS 

WILLIS, GREG 

WILSON. KEITH 

WISCHMANN, ERIC 
WOOTEN, DON 
WYATT, BRIAN 

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BARRINCTON, JEROME 

BOLES, TED 

CURENTON, SCOTT 

CRUZ, ALFRED 

DAHL, MIKE 

DAVIS, BRIAN 

DEAN, JACKIE 

DEMPSEY, MARK 

DENNEY, BRIAN 

DEWAR, BRENT 

DUNAUNT, MICHAEL 

DYKES, EDDIE 

EDWARDS, TOM 

GRIAS, PAUL 

HEAD, DONALD 

HEAD, RONALD 

HENBY, DONALD 

HIX, LEE 

HOWARD, TODD 

LITTLE, MARC 

MARSHAL, RON 

MCDANIEL, RONNIE 

MIDDLEBROOK, WALTER 

MILLER, JOHN 

SAUNDERS, SCOTT 

SCHERL, WADE 

SMITH, JEFF 

STAFFORD, GREGG 

STAHL, DAVID 

TALBERT, BILL 

TtW, TIM 

VANBUSKIRK, DAVID 

WATSON, MARK 

WHITE, TOMMY 

WOLF, NICK 




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Ken Elder and Robert Ramsey share 
a few laughs after a Rush party. 




248 Greeks 



Panhellenic and Interfraternity Council 



Governing the Greeks 




The TSU PanhcllcriK Council 
stands for good sc holarship, 

good health and mainte- 
nance of fine standards 
When the Panhellenic Coun- 
cil meets, they disc uss and 
take care of sorority matters 
The Interfraternity Council is 
the governing body for all 
fraternities and is composed 
of representitives from each 
of the TSU fraternities. IFC 
holds the same responsibil- 
ities as the Panhellenic 
Council as well as working 
closely with Panhellenic. 

Top: Row One: Sherrie Pndgen. 
Row Two: Bcis\ Jordan, Dehsha 
Taylor, Lanic Fowler, Lonna Smith 
and Barbara Patterson. 
Bottom Row Two: Pat Smith, Jeff 
Martin, Brian Hill, Ronald Head, Bob 
Dodson, Ken Gaines, Jeff Strause, 
Brad Burns, Ray Winborne and Ter- 
rell Boyd Row Two: Alfred Cruz, 
Cam Orbaugh, "seal Vjsh, Tommy 
Clark, Scott Hefner. Randy Hough, 
Paul Johnson, John Osbourne. Clark 
Meyers, Matt Mingus and Ronnie 
Mullins. 



• i 249 



Alpha Delta Pi 

We Live For Each Other 




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Row One: Shawn Fiason, Jen Pan- 
ton, Dana Mock, Alyson Keel, Tra- 
cey Ard, Pam Ard, Beth Weather- 
ford, Amy Markert, Amy Evans, Ter- 
ry Bass, Zan Quinn and Penny 
Wachob. Row Two: Lisa Sprague, 
Kim Hastings, Kim Jones, Lonna 
Smith, Jen Panton, Tonya Thomp- 
son, Garyn Harrington, Amy Turner, 
Eden Seery, Emily Brewer, Pam 
Goodwin, Melanie Davis, Lori 
Voyles and Julie Halley. Row Three: 
Andi Faircloth, Kerri Johnson, Traci 
Baker, Amanda Barfield, Leslie Bat- 
tin, Sharon Jo Davis, Lisa Visco, Me- 



lanie Trombetta, Shea Stevenson, 
Christy Williams, Slater Landrum, 
Cara Mc Clellan, Sherri Pridgen, Mi- 
chelle Fivian and Fran Landers. Row 
Four: Amy Mitchell, Renee Eady, 
Karon Radzik, Jane Jackson, Kandi 
Shriver, Anna Pope, Mary Pope, Pat- 
ty McFillin, Karol Wells, Lisa Taylor, 
Molly Trombetta, Michelle Claw- 
son, Karenn Morrow, Jill Hart, Lisa 
Flowers and Erin Slattery. 
Bottom Right: Showing great Home- 
coming spirit, the ADPis enter the 
stadium after the parade. 




250 Creeks 




1) Name ol Organization: Alpha Delta Pi 

2) Favorite Soap Opera: S.mt.i Barbara 

\) Most Common Brand ol Hairspray Aqua Net 

4) Movie MOSI Rented to Avoid Studies Dirt, Dam - 

ing 

5) Favorite Sayings to Shoe Polish on ( ai Windows: 

PATA baby 

6) Favorite Pla< e to Kit in Troy: Crowes ( hk ken 

7) Most Common Shoe Size: Seven and-a-hall 

8) Favorite Brand of Make-up: Mary Kay 

9) Who Borrows Clothes tin- Most Melanie Davis 

10) Most Common Bad Habit: Not Washing Dirty 
Dishes in the Sink 





Top: Tonya and Meloni Thompson 
not only share childhood secrets but 
great M)Pi memories as well 
Middle: Row One: Brian Wagon- 
er, Tommy Panton. David Hudson, 
Paul -\dams, Man Ruud and Chuck 
Morris Row Two: Matt Gambino, 
Mark Ta> lor \ in< e Mansburv Mike 
Lynch, Brian Ridgewav and Lang 
Thompson. 

Bottom: The ADPis won the 
Homecoming skit with a taki 
from an IN\^ \ ideo. 






Alpha Gamma Delta 

The Beginning That Never Ends 




Row One: Christy King, Danna Kay 
Raulerson, Beth Sumner, Margaret 
Aultman, Maria Duncan, Lisa Car- 
penter, Rhonda Smith, Stephanie 
Hepler, Lisa Palmisano, Monica An- 
derson, Gretchen Crim, Tammy 
Wood, Chrissie McLeroy, Jerilyn 
Cassidy, Carrie Clikas, Ellen Stevens, 
Marie Bush and Susan Owens. Row 
Two: Keely Abbott, Alicia Burke, Ni- 
col'e Guy, Nancy Eishen, Amy Smith, 
Kecia Higgins, Paige Gilliland, 
Tammy Cornett, Shannon Stewart, 
Leighann Richards, Marina Gray, 
Mimi Thames, Julie Guiterrez, Kim 
Baker, Amy Vaughn and Peggy Dun- 
can. Row Three: Leigh Mundy, 
Mary Duffy, Lisa Williams, Liz Bran- 
non, Shonda Odom, Leslie Fuller, 



Tara Murray, Nikki Stephens, Jacki 
Lakka, Cathy Tuberville, Amy Smith, 
Kari Klinzing, Jennifer Taylor, Cath- 
erine Hinckley and Michelle Wad- 
dington. Row Four: Tracy Bennett, 
Jean Brown, Karen Thomas, Luci 
Hodge, Allison Williford, Kelli In- 
gles, Leslie Stephens, Joanna Ed- 
mondson, Dani Cleckler, Cindy 
Johnson, Allison Lott, Carolyn 
Trathowen, Suzanne Kopf, Mimi 
Brown, Leslie Ogdon and Jamie 
Renfro. Row Five: Carla Halstead, 
Gail Price, Dedie Taylor, Angie Per- 
ry, Dawn Hutchinson, Michelle 
Krist, Karen Hamilton, Leigh Kyzar, 
Melissa Morris, Sandra Smith, Joy 
Holliday, Heather Kates, Kelli Mur- 
phy and Kim Deavor. 




252 Greeks 




1) Name of Organization: Alpha Gam 

2) Favorite Soap Opera: Young and tin- Restless 

3) Most Common Brand of Hairspray: DeMert All-Set 

4) Movie Most Rented to Avoid Studies: "About Last 
Night" 

5) Favorite Saying to Shoe Polish on Car Windows: 
Alpha Gam 1 

6) Favorite Place to Eat in Troy: Harvey's 

7) Most Comon Shoe Size: seven and-a-half 

8) Favorite Brand of Make-up: Merle Norman 

9) Who Borrows Clothes the Most: Everybody 

10) Most Common Bat! Habit: None 




Top Lett: Row One: Dave Young, Ja- 
son Scoggins, Rick Maghone, Carmi 

owery and Ken Elder. Row Two: 
Stuart Vines, Bernie Tucker. Karl 
Smeltzer, Wade Adams, Dwayne 
Harrington and Scott Steele Row 
Three: Kenny Jackson, Kieth Mad- 
dor, |efl Ken in Steve Grice, Chris 
McCracken and Cam Orbaugh 
Middle Left: Dawn Hutihmson and 
lennifei raylor impersonate Dr jnd 
Mrs. Adams during their Homecom- 
ing skit 

Middle Right Cam Orbaugh and 
Amy Smith have a terrific big broth- 
er and little sister relationship. 






Alpha Kappa Alpha 

Servicehood For All Mankind 




Top: Row One: Rebecca Morey, 
Tammy Campbell, Hermia Simmons 
and Cynthia Bogan-Bady. Row Two: 
LaFran Knight, Cynthia Spencer, 
Saundra Madison and Latonyan Ben- 
nett. Row Three: Gail Moton, Kim 
Knight, Valerie Grayson and Monica 
Hasley. 

Right: AKA's: Kim Knight, Valerie 
Grayson and Tammy Campbell are 
dressed as preppy scholars and are 
ready to go. 




254 Greeks 




1)Name of Organization: Alph.i K.ippa Alph.i 
2)Favorite soap opera: r he Young and the Restless 

3)Most (ommon brand of hairspray: Splow 

4)Movie most rented to avoid Studying: "We don't 

avoid studying." 

5)Favorite saying to shoe polish on car windows: AK A 

on board 

6)Favorite place to eat in Troy: Mr. J's 

7)Most common shoe size: Seven 

8)Favorite brand of makeup: Fashion Fair 

9)Who borrows clothes the most: "no one" 

10) Most common bad habit: "eating habits" 




Top: AKA spirit is found all over 
TSU campus. 

Middle: The Alpha Kappa Alpha's 
spend quality time together after at- 
tending church services. 
Bottom: Beverly Johnson and Lar- 
tonyan Bennett get makeovers from 
a specialist. 



Grec* 



Chi Omega 

Chi Omega Friendship is Good as Gold! 




Top: Row One: Lanie Taylor, Kim 
Smith, Wendy Avery, Franci Dennis, 
Shawn Price, Caprice Defalco, Suzie 
Meyer, Debbie Flowers, Julie Nolan, 
Sherry Wallace, Julie Thorpe, Laura 
Leverette, Meredith Morgan, Janet 
Daughtery and Darlene Hutchinson. 
Row Two: Mary Anne Moncrief, 
Kelley Price, Leslie Dosier, Sandra 
Moultrie, Lisa Stone, Felicia Pierce, 
Shelli Burkhalter, Chimane Garner, 
Rhonda Chism, Eve Motley, Mi- 
chelle Sexton, Allison Ambercrom- 
bie, Bellamie Sauls, Marcie Little and 
Debbie Blair. Row Three: Regina 
Reynolds, Jan Kuntz, Andrea Curto, 
Toby Wright, Angela Evans, Steph- 
anie Russell, Betty Ann Jipp, Tracy 
Rosenquist, Shanda Schroeder, Kris 
Bean, Holly Long, Kelly Capps, 



Christy Straughn, Mariann Mincey, 
Amy Peacock, Kipp Butler, Kristen 
Wertz and Kadi Hendricks. Row 
Four: Jenni Isles, Julie Meadows, Kim 
Howell, Michelle McEwan, Heather 
McDaniel, Tammy Moye, Heather 
Huber, Debbie McGill, Scottie Sum- 
mers, Julee Ponthier, Lori Tillman, 
Rachel Dyson, Donna Bice, Kerri 
Holloway, Jenni Pierce, Staci Lind- 
sey, Lori Dean, Tonya DeMoss, Betty 
Thomas and Lisa Sirmon. Row Five: 
Gene DeFontaine, Larry Crisp, Don 
McGee, Joe Dimsa, Randy Huff, 
Derek Brown, Vance Beck, Keith 
Wilson, Jeff Cotton and Jim Logan. 
Bottom: Duncan and Julee give a 
loving Chi-O squeeze at a flag foot- 
ball game. 




256 Greeks 




1)Name of organization? Chi Omega 

2)Favorite soap opera? Days of Our Li\es 

J)Most common brand of hairspray? Clairol-Final Net 

4 (Movie most rented to avoid studies? Dirt'. Dancing 

5)Favorite sayings to shoe polish on tar windows? — 

-'s III sis 

6)Favorite place to eal in Troy? Crowe's 

7)Most common shoe size? 8 

8)Favorite brand of make-up? Merle Norman 

9)Who borrows clothes the most? Lynn Balducci 

10)Most common bad habit ? Eating pi//a late at night 




Top: The Chi-O's are ready for fun 
at a knee-slaping,'Ho Down' of a 
pledge swap! 

Left: Andrea Curto and Toby 
Wright show that 'Big Sis-lil Sis' are 
unique and special friends. 



Top Right: Tonya DeMoss, Kris 

Bean, Tracy Rosenquist, Chimane 

Garner and Shanda Schroder: the 

next TSU starting line?! 

Bottom Right: Heather McDaniel 

and friend enjoy the Homecoming 

parade. 



■ 



Delta Chi 



Leges 




Top: Row One: Cina McKethan 
and Marcus Paramore. Row Two: 
Dani Cleckler, Grady Capps, Felicia 
Pierce, Pam McEwan, Tina Bradley 
and Pat Smith. Row Three: Kyle 
Smith, Jeff Tabler, Tobey Smith and 
Vickie Roach. Row Four: Keith 
Smith, Chip Vice, Lee Simmons, Jen- 
nifer Lavley, Sherri Pridgen, Mary- 
anne Moncrief, Susan Johnson, 
Mary Elkins and John Holley. Row 
Five: Jimmy Cann, Richie Bates, Ter- 
ry Pilcher and James Ellison. Row Six: 
Wade Adams, Chuck Boggs, Brad 
McDowell, Randy Hicks, Jerry Cal- 



houn, Andrew Breslin, Greg Pugh, 
Joey Knight, Keith Skelton, Patrick 
Meek, Chris Waites, Ray Windham, 
Michael Maddox and James Craw- 
ford. Row Seven: Charles Rogers, 
Rich Osner, Mark Green, Daniel 
Dwyer, Wayne Hendley, Jeff Long, 
Scott Hefner, Michael Mosley, Doug 
Stone, Bert Kelly, James Mathews, 
Darren McKethan, Vince Stansbury, 
Robert Wagner, Danny Edwards, 
Brad Koch and Larry Crisp. 
Bottom Right: Jeff Long is practicing 
his routine for the high bar. 




258 Greeks 




1) Name <>t Organization: Delta Chi 

2) Wh.n Pen enl of Your Fraternity \\ e.irs Boxi 

Briefs: 50 Percent 

h l avoi ite Beverage: " I he Beast" 

4) Most Common Line Used on .i Girl: Please! 

5) Favorite Mens ( ologne: Halston /-14 

6) Most Common I xc use to Blow Off ( lass Hang- 

ovei 

7) Best Place to Hide a Cooler: On the Roof of Our 
House 

8) Most Common Activity to Partir ipate in on Sunday 
Afternoon: Golf 

9) Most Common Bad Hahit: Inability to walk up- 
stairs 

10) How Often Do You Do the Laundry: Once Every 
Two Weeks 



Top Left: Row One: Tobey Smith, 
Dani Cleckler, Vicki Roach, Gina 
McKethan, Felicia Pierce, Pam 
McEwan and Tina Bradlc\ Row 
Two: Leo Simmons, Jennifer La\el\ 
Sherri Pridgen, Mar\anne Mom net 
Susan Johnson and Mary Elkins. 
Middle Left left Tabler and Chip 
\ ic c u oping the women. 
Middle Right: There's nothing like a 
good rest after a long day on the 
front. 
Bottom Right: Parts with the Pi's. 



•s 259 



Delta Sigma Theta 



Our Love Grows 




Left to Right: Deborah Mack, Cyn- 
thia Cant, Kyna McCall and Tracy 
Spencer. 

Bottom: Deborah Mack and Kyna 
McCall take a rest under one of the 
trees in Pace quad. 




260 Greeks 




1)Name of Organization: Delta Sigma Thct.i 
2)Favorite Soap Opera: Young and the Restless 
3)Most Common Brand of Hairspray: ISO Plus 
4)Movie Most Rented to Avoid Studies: Die Hard 
5)Favorite Place to Eat in Troy: Burger King 
6)Most Common Shoe Size: Size tight 
7)Favorite Brand of Hairspray: Fashion Fair 
8)Who Borrows Clothes the Most? Tracey Spencer 
9)Most Common Bad Habit: Sleeping during the day 




Top: Cynthia Cant gets read) 10 

drive the Delta's car during the 
Homecoming parade. 
\1iddle: The Delta Sigs aUa\s en- 
joy spending time together to i ele- 
brate their sisterhood. 
Bottom: Brothers trom the Fraten- 
itv Omega Psi Phi trom Mabama 
State I nisersiu like to \isit the Tro\ 
State Delta SigS 






Kappa Alpha Psi 

Many Come, Few Are Chosen 




Top: The Kappas showing a few of 
their dance skills. 

Bottom: Scoring a touchdown 
against the SAE's. 




262 Greeks 



1)Ndme of Organization: kappa Alpha Psi f raternit) . 
In< 

2)Wh.it percenl ol youi fraternity wears boxei 
briefs: B0°/a briefs 
3)Favorite Beverage: ( ol e 

4)M(jsi common 1 1 f i< • used on a girl Hey baby, I'm a 
Nupe 

5)1 avorite men's cologne: Obsession 
6)Mosi c ommon exi use to Mow oft < lass: \\ e are not 
going to do anything anyway 
7)Bes1 pla< e to hide «i < OOler: Disguise the cooler 
b\# boom box 

8)Most common activity to participate in on Sunday 
afternoon: Search for Sunday dinner because tin- 
cafe is c losed 

9)Most common bad habit: We have no bad habits 
10)1 low often do you do the laundry: Every week 




Top: The Kappa Sweet's posing for 
a picture in the amphitheater. 
Middle Left: Kappa Alpha Psi 
Sweethearts participate in the Step- 
pin show. 

Middle Right: The Kappas excel in 
almost any kind of sport. 
Bottom Right: E nt Benn shoots for 
the water basketball team. 






Kappa Delta 

Let us strive for that which is honor- 
able, beautiful, and highest. 




Row One: Jennifer Whiddon, Kim 
Brown, Mary Elkins, Melonie Con- 
nell, Edie Pendelton, Christy Brooks 
and Amy Felder. Row Two: Joanna 
Brantly, Jill Girdner, Heidi Chastain, 
Julie Ann Edelberg, Beth Hoffman, 
Cindy Warren, Flora Zorn, Tony 
Faulkner, Kim Gore, Beth Lewis, 
Cheryl Streets and Tyson Griswold. 
Row Three: Tammy Livingston, Amy 
Pope, Jill Easton, Carla Cole, Sherry 
Morris, Janet Lott, Greta Kantor, 
Rhonda Whitehead, Kim Heaton, 
Samantha Woodham, Sharla Wilson, 
Kim Fuller and Melani Shepard. Row 



Four: Lisa Roten, Belinda Rusnak, 
Sonya Fortune, Jennifer Dykema, 
Sharon Bloodworth, Mitzi Ketchum, 
Angi Mobley, Pat Parker, Jenni 
James, Donna Jean Ivy, Traci Hughes, 
Leigh Ann Word, Kendra Tice, Shan- 
non Nix and Lee Green. Row Five: 
Gina Graves, Toyna Lott, Melissa 
Watson, Laura Leaman, Traci John- 
son, Jana Bradshaw, Ashley Mann, 
Elicia Boutwell, Suzanne Snow, 
Christy Vickery, Stephanie Stearns, 
Karen McDaniels, Ginger Burton, 
Julie Halcomb, Stephanie Reeves 
and Angela Grant. 




264 Greeks 




1) Name of organization? Kappa Delhi 

2) Favorite soap opera? Guiding I ight 

j) Most common brand of hairspray? Clairol 

4) Movie most rented to avoid studies? Wizard of Oz 

5) Favorite sayings to shoe polish on ( ar windows? KD 
Ladies!! 

6) Favorite place to eat in Troy? Wilson's 

7) Most common shoe si/c?l ight and a half 

8) Favorite brand of make-up? Clinique 

9) Who borrows clothes the most? Carol Ann Mite h- 
ell 

10) Most common bad habit? Skipping Class 



Top: Kappa Delta sisterhood is spir- 
ited and proud during the Home- 
coming Festivities. 
Left Pam DeRamus and Jenni James 
know their KD sisterhood is over the 
rainbow. 

Right: Stephanie Medley and 
Rhonda Whitehead anticipate 
meeting the new pledges on Squeal 
Day. 

Opposite Page: Carol Ann Mitchell 
and Ellen Branch show the lasting 
friendships that are made during 
rush week. 



■ 



Lambda Chi Alpha 



Every Man a Man 




Top: Row One: Derek Stump, Jim 
Larson, Don McGee, Bret Kirkland, 
Bubba Ritchburg, Steve Sprewell, 
Bernie Tucker, Eric Rochester, 
Charles Polk and Dale Harden. Row 
Two: Scott Johnson, David Young, 
Randy Hugh, Scott Steele, Scott 
Reynolds, Chris Gemme, Todd Tan- 
ner, Mike Wichersheim, Andrew 
Greenwall, Brooks Ott, Kevin Alsup, 
Mark Alexamder, Geoff Ward, Sean 
Daugherty, Keith Weeks, Robert 
McDowell and Kenny Grimes. Row 
Three: Patrick Lamb, Rick Shera, 
Dave Bryant, Andy Fleener, Steve 
Ogburn and Jeff Osbourne. Row 
Four: Dave Fetisma, Rob Smith, Ja- 
son Capstraw, Gene Cottingham, 
Dwayne Harrington and Gus Silva. 
Bottom: Lambda Chi little sisters 
support their favorite fraternity by 
wearing jerseys. 




266 Greeks 



l)\ame ol Organization: Lambda Chi Alph.t 

2)Wh<n percent o( youi fraternity \\<-.irs \y 

briefs? 20% boxers 

))Favorite beverage? Anything Scott Steeli I • 

4)Most ( ommon line used on a girl? Don't call me, I'll 

call you 

5)Fdvoritc men's cologne? Drakkar, Polo, -\ramis 

(>)Mosl ( ommon excuse to l)low off ckiss' Front 

Porch Flu or Tough night at BSU 

7)Best place to Hide cooler!' Who hides them?!? 

8)Most common activity to participate in on Sunday 

afternoon? Sleeping late then dinner .it Mr Ho's 

9)Most c ommon bad habit ? Staying out too late on a 

sc hool night 

10)How often do you do laundry? After every pair of 

underwear has been worn inside and out 





Top: Robert Barnes is proud to be a 
Lambda Chi 

Middle: Little >/-ftv. Row One: 
^nmarie Marriott, Jov Hollidj\ 

Kan Lovfald and Ashley Sabatini. 

Row Two: kim Greene \ngie Tan- 
ner, Tammy Cushsmar, Cindv John- 
son, Leigh Munch horn, 
Minn Thames and Beck\ Bi 
Row Three: Tammv Hagador, Traci 
Cross, Dana Danik Stephanie 
Stearns, Allyson Lott Karen link 
BetS) Thomas, Maui tittle kell\ 
Price and Rhonda Chism 
Bottom: 1 here is nothinv; like a lit- 
tle Lambda C hi brotherhood. 









Phi Mu 

Les Soeurs Fidelis 




Top: Row One: Karen Locke, Lor- 
ris Harris, Stephanie Harper, Su- 
zanne Adams, Dana Hobbs, Tiffany 
Watts, Deidre Wilson, Genie Col- 
vard, Tina Kirkland and Ashley Saba- 
tini. Row Two: Kristin Cwalina, Susie 
Skowron, Tina Connel, Jennifer Lea- 
vins, Natosha Allred, Lynn Smeltzer, 
Pam Mikkelson, Joy Jones and 
Marisa Ridgeway. Row Three: Jill 
Roach, Carlotta Smith, Beth Craw- 
ford, Traci Pecci, Brooke White, 
Kelly Clifton, Ivy Dickinson, Kim 



Garrett and Cindy Simmons. Row 
Four: Stacy Pecci, Julene Bush, Becca 
Walden, Christy Crutcher, Rebecca 
Riggs, Kelly Pettis, Robin Riggs, 
Sandy Scarpinato and Gena Bent- 
kovvski. Row Five: Renee Gunter, 
Tracy Strouse, Carla Price, Julie Es- 
linger, Kristyn Richardson, Gina 
Soto, Missy Schofield, Tammy Haga- 
dorn, Kari Lovfald and Ginger Piaz- 
za. 

Bottom Left: Study break in the 
chapter room. 




268 Greeks 




1) Name of organization: Phi Mu 

2) Favorite soap opera: s.mta Barbera 

3) Most c ommon brand of hairspray : Salon Sele< tives 

4) Movie most rented to avoid studies: Sec ret of My 
Sue < ess 

5) Favorite sayings to shoe polish on < ar w indows: IOB 

6) Favorite place to eat in Troy: Mr. j's 

7) Most common shoe size: 7 

8) Favorite brand of make-up: Estee Lauder 

9) Who borrows clothes the most: Becca Walden 

10) Most common bad habit: Spending money. 



Top Left: Phi Mu sisters realize that 

there is more to life than studying. 

Middle Lett: Teresa Mckinney and 

Melissa Mullis embrace in a hug of 

sisterhood. 

Middle Right: Pausing for a picture 

break during the busy activities of 

Rush. 

Bottom Right: Phi Mu sisters slum ,i 

few of the many different attitudes 

of Homecoming. 



■ s 269 



Pi Kappa Phi 

Brotherhood With A Purpose. 



yy>\>y*>Y>+-i->j rr ■ 




Top: Row One: Jason Gregory, 
Angela Henderson, Fred Waters, 
Leigh Grant, Mike Cavanagh, Mi- 
caela Lockridge, Sonya Fortune, Jim 
Seal, John Holman and Deidre Wil- 
son. Row Two: Joel Shields, Greg 
Childs, Jodi Pierce, Chad Deneve, 
Richard Dyke, Brad Burns, Jill 
Girdner, Tonya Lott, Jennifer Wat- 
ford, Bob Dotson, Johnny Johnson, 
Ed Mussler, Thed Whatley, Amy 
Markert, Ed Livingston and Bill 
Kuntz. Row Three: Charlie Dormer, 
Alan Ruud, Brad Weatherford, Brian 
Scruggs, Chris Beam, David Dorsey, 
Jeff Curvin, Scott Norris and Alan 
Bryant. Row Four: Roxanne Ells- 
worth, Chuck Norris, Vic Roberts, 



Steve Murphree, Phil Nichols, Jeff 
Rushing, Stephen Gauss, Johnny 
Brock, Jim Lavender, Ronnie Wig- 
gins, Derek Brown, Joey Lewis, Frank 
Maxwell and Lori Letson. Row Five: 
Rob Green, Todd Johnson, Glenn 
Snyder, Bill Lamkin, Tory Price and 
Alan Smith. Row Six: Chad Tortor- 
ice, Lorrie Harris, Patty McFillen, 
Rick Boutwell, Cricket White, Mi- 
chelle Fivian, Traci Pecci, Michelle 
Krist and Keith Maddox. Row Sev- 
en: Brian Ridgeway, Mike Cynch, 
Jeff Cook and Dan Benchabbat. 
Bottom: It's amazing how many 
people you can meet during a frater- 
nity party. 




270 Greeks 




1) Name of Organization: Pi Kappa Phi 

2) What Percent of Your Fraternity Wears Boxers vs 
Briefs: 65°/o Boxers, 351 Briefs 

3) Favorite beverage: Miller Lite 

4) Most Common Line Used on a Girl: Sure I have a 
girlfriend, but we date other people 

5) Favorite Men's Cologne: Drakkar 

6) Most Common Excuse to Blow Off Class: The all 
you can e.it buffet at China Garden 

7) Best Place to Hide a Cooler: On the roof 

8) Most Common Activity to Partu ipate in on Sunday 
Afternoon: Softball 

9) Most Common Bad Habit: Procrastination 

10) How often do you do the Laundry: Once a month 



Top: Row One: Lori Letson, Patt\ 
McFillen, Leigh Grant, Tonya Lott 
and Cricket White. Row Two: |odi 
Pierce, Sonya Fortune, Jill Cirdner, 
Diedre Wilson, Roxanne Wilson, 
Kris Bean, Laurie Harris and Mikaela 
Lockridge. Row Three: Michelle 
Krist, Michelle Fivian, Trac\ Pecci, 
Amy Marker! and Jennifer Watford. 
Middle Left: The Pi Kapps enjoying a 
very productive fall rush. 
Middle Right: A short pause for a 
group picture in the yard. 
Bottom Right: The Pi Kapps enjoy- 
ing a homecoming trailer ride 



Crer« 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon 



The True Gentlemen 




Top: Row One: Dave Britton, Sean 
Lager, John Findlater, Bob Rice, 
Marc Owens and Rob Newman. 
Row Two: Carson McCrary, Steve 
Pyle, Lynn Huff, Monica Friday, De- 
die Taylor, Paige Gilliland, Tommy 
Clark, Steve Grice, Marc Wilder, 
Dennis Truesdell, Ricky Woods, 
Mark Knotts, David Clark, Leigh Ann 
Richards, Beth Sumner, Paige Gilli- 
land and Julie Meadows. Row Three: 
Shawn Ward, Toby Walker, Cleve 
McFay, Walt Porter, Kim Deavor, 
Kim Reddoch, Brad Bowen, Vance 
Beck, Marc Manning, Toby Warr, Ed 
Parish, Tony Atkins, Joe Dimisa, 
Mike Black, Chip Chapman, Kim 
Howell, Pat Jordan and Brad Murph. 



Row Four: Richie Stewart, Paul 
Turner, Ronnie Mullins, Woody 
Woodall, Jason Bennett, Chris 
McCall, Frank DiDesare, Mark 
Showmaker, Chris McCracken, 
Danny Lee, Matt Mingus, Robert 
Renfroe, Steve Parrish, David Hud- 
son, Matt Folmar, Hal Brosnaham. 
Row Five: Ted Sullivan, Ray Win- 
borne, Anthony Kummel, Chuck 
Ransom, Anthony Slaughter, Rich- 
ard Hice, Randall Curtis, Bret Stall- 
worth, Tommy Lockett, Danny 
Beard, Kevin Hyche, Frank Scar- 
brough and Chris Wilson. 
Bottom: Scott Standerfer enjoys 
meeting new people at a SAE rush 
party. 









Br ^^^ 








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272 Greeks 




1) Name of Organization: Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

2) What Percent of Your Fraternity W cars Boxers vs 
Briefs: 30 Percent 

J) favorite Beverage: Beer ( oke 

4) Most Common Line Used on a Girl: My Place or 
Yours 

5) Favorite Men's Cologne: Polo 

6) Most Common Excuse to Blow Off Class: f fangover 

7) Best Place to Hide a Cooler: In the Ceiling 

8) Most Common Activity to Participate in on Sunday 
Afternoon: Football Games on T.V. 

9) Most Common Bad Habit: Skipping Class 

10) How Often Do You Do the Laundry: Once Every 
Two Weeks 




Top: Row One: Janet Lott, Carrie 
Clikas, Greta Kantor, Lynn Huff, De- 
die Taylor and Paige Gilliland. Row 
Two: Kim Howell, Slater Landrum, 
Leighann Richards, Paige Christo- 
pher, Donna Bice and Julie Mead- 
ows. Row Three: Kim Reddock, 
Beth Sumner, Kelli Blue, Kim Dea- 
vor, Michelle Rush and Jen Panton. 
Middle Left Brotherhood plays a big 
role in the SAE fraternity. 
Middle Right: Posing for a picture 
around the SAE lion. 
Bottom Right: Pausing for a picture 
during a very busy rush. 






Sigma Chi 

In Hoc Signo Vinces 




Top: Row One: Judy Bell, Liz Wil- 
liams, Mark Rose, Reid Pichard, 
Chris Smith, Ian Hunt, Hal Harwell, 
Scott Dew, Diane Blackmon, Andy 
Gregory, Garry Cannon, Rick Mag- 
lione and Jeff Steiner. Row Two: 
Kyle Smith, Alan Abercrombie, Eric 
Wischmann, Roger Weyner, Sandy 
Scarpinato, Chris Mauk, Joe Norton, 
Monica Anderson, Kevin Parrish, 
Amy Smith, Daryl Haupt, Janet Dou- 
gherty, Tobi Wright, Molly Trom- 
betta, Bill Harris, Michelle McEwan 
and Jenny lies. Row Three: Ken 
Maraman, Bryan Wyatt, Sissy Burke, 
Bill Scarbrough, Annemarie Bell, 
Chris Wilkes, Jim Norton, Cam Or- 
baugh, Ellie Jane Sharpe, Kathryn 
Hanson, Lance Cole, Steve Johnson, 
Jason Scoggins, Daren Ferguson, 
Shea Phillips, Kathy Roberts and 
Todd Hancock. Row Four: Lisa Pal- 
misano, Van English, Jim Bradsher, 



Scott Walden, Jan Kuntz, Bruce 
Buehler, Tyson Griswold, Tim Ja- 
cobs, Charlie Cosey, Jean Defon- 
taine and Carl Davis. Row Five: Cal 
Abercrombie, David Johnson, Kurt 
McCall, Greg Gill, Jeff Corbitt, Lisa 
Williams, Heather Huber, Frank 
Dubberly, Don Wooten, Lance Ta- 
tum, Michelle Gorey, Paul Hovey, 
Steve Gorey, Tom Knight, Louis De- 
Brosse, Jeff Cotton and Kent Chap- 
man. Row Six: Tom Meehan, Mike 
Jones, Brian Hill, Tim Welch, Jim 
Whepley, Lang Thompson, Mark 
Alessandroni and Marrell Hartley. 
Row Seven: Brian Wagoner, Phil 
Gibson, Brad Sutter, Kenny Jackson, 
Derek Haupt, Neal Nash, Ken Elder, 
Troy Horton, Robert Ramsey, Mike 
McConnell, John Osburn, Brian 
Harper and John Brooks. 
Bottom: Brian Cain shows his en- 
thusiasm over Derby. 




274 Greeks 




1)Name of Organization: Sigma Chi 

2)What percent of your fraternity weirs boxers \s 

briefs: I don't know, I don't look! 

3)Favorite Beverage: Milk, in any form. 

4)Most common line used on a girl: I swear I won't tell 

your sorority sisters. 

5)Favorite men's ( ologne: Without a doubt, it's v,o\t,\ 

be anything besides "Lagerfeld". 

6)Most common excuse to blow off class: Waitl 

There's "milk" left 

7)Best place to hide a cooler: Who needs a cooler? 

8)Most common activity to partic ipate in on Sunday 

afternoon: Golf ball hitting contest. 

9)Most common bad habit: Not paying our dues. 

10)How often do you do the laundry: Laundry? 



Top: Row One: Lisa Williams, Les- 
lie Fuller, Michelle Corey, Liz Wil- 
iams, Judy Bell, Heather Huber and 
Tobi Wright Row Two: I eslic Anne 
Jones, Kathy Roberts, Diane Black- 
mon, Monica Anderson, Janet Dou- 
gherty and Molly Trombetta. Row 
Three: Lisa Palmisano, Annemane 
Bell, Sandy Scarpinato, Jan Kunt/. 
Kathryn Hanson, Felicia Burke, Amy 
Smith and Ellie Jane Sharpe. 
Middle Left: Mark Alessandroni 
shows off the body he got during 
spring break 

Middle Right: A group of Thursd.iv 
night partiers pose for a picture. 
Bottom Right: Every hour the 5igS 
meet to discuss current affairs 



• 



Sigma Pi 

New Boys on the Block 




Row One: Marc Little, T.J Edwards, 
Mike Dahl, Scott Sanders, David 
Stancil, Pat Allen, Alfred Cruz and 
Randy Stephens. Row Two: Greg 
Stafford, Donald Head, Eddie Dykes, 
Scott Curenton, Lee Hix, Nick Wolf 
and Ron Marshall. Row Three: Paul 
Griggs, Fester Martin, Donnie 
Downs, Rodney George, Walter 
Middlebrooks, Billy Crawford and 
Billie Talbot. Row Four: Ronald 
Head, Don Henby, Mark Watson, 
Brian Denny, Mickey Dunnavant 
and Lance Harper. Row Five: Wade 
Scherl, Kyle Glover, Jerome Barring- 
ton and David Vanbuskirk. 
Bottom: The winning Homecoming 
skit for fraternities was won by this 
group of cool fellows. 



276 Greeks 





1)Name of Organization: Sigma Pi 

2)What Percent of Your Fraternity Wears Boxers vs 

fir itf s <■ 40 tO 60 percent 

ill avorite Beverage: B — -! 

4)Most Common Line Used on a Girl: Do you want to 

dan< e? 

5)Favoritc Men's ( ologne: Obsession 

6)Most Common fxcuse To Blow Off Class: Too 

mm fi partying tfie night before 

7)BeSl Place to Hide a Cooler: Trunk of ( ar 

8)Most Common A( tivity to Participate in on Sunday 

Afternoon: "R and R" 

9)Most Common Bad Habit: Burping 

10)How Often Do You Do the Laundry: After the last 

pair of underwear is gone 



Row One: Neccie Dobbs, Kristin 
Cnalina, Regina Boykin, Julie Gutier- 
rez, Marian McShane, Suzie Ro- 
mano and Marsha Roark. Row Two: 
Kelly Naftel, Scherie Harvard, Tiffa- 
ny Watts, Suzane Adams, Jennifer 
Leavins, Tina Williams and Kim Ba- 
ker. 



Top Right: John Miller, Tina Wil- 
liams and Alfred Cruise cuddle to- 
gether on the couch. 
Middle Left: Lee Hicks gives Julie 
Gutierrez a smooch on the cheek. 
Bottom Right: Ronald Head and 
Jackie Dean toast to their fraternit\ 



Greeks 277 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 

Largest Fraternity in the World 




Top: Row One: Mark Hall and 
Keith Shipman. 

Row Two: Eric Martin, Mark How- 
ard, David Dawson, Christopher 
Pugh, Paul Johnston and Clark 
Myers. 

Row Three: Ken Terrell, Michael 
Kimbrough and Karon Radzik. 
Right: Chris Pugh waits for things 
to get started. 




278 Greeks 




1) Name of Organization: Tail Kappa Epsilon 

2) What u u of your fraternity wears boxers \.s br lets' 1 
60 briefs, 40% boxers 

3) Favorite beverage? Miller Lite 

4) Most common line used on a girl? Haven't I seen 
you somewhere before? 

5) Favorite men's cologne? Drakkar 

6) Most common excuse to blow off class? Not 
enough sleep. 

7) Best place to hide a cooler? Under the sink in the 
kitchen. 

8) Most common activity to participate in on Sunday 
after non? Pool Parties 

9) Most common bad habit? Skipping class 

10) How often do you do the laundry? Only when 
necessary 




Top Left: Karon Radzik, Sweetheart. 
Right" Paul Johnston is proud of 
TKE's winning the 1987-1988 IFC 
Scholarship Trophy. 



Bottom ienvEric Martin, secretary; 
Paul lohnston, President; and Chris- 
topher Pugh, treasurer. 



Greek 



Mr. IFC and Miss Panhellenic 



Pat Smith 



Ginger Piazza 





Each year, two Greeks, one 
male and one female are 
chosen Mr. IFC and Miss 
Panhellenic. The award is 
based on outstanding contri- 
butions to the Greek system 
and on superior leadership in 
an individual Greek organi- 
zation and in campus activi- 
ties. Pat Smith is a brother of 
the Delta Chi Fraternity. He 
likes to be constantly in- 
volved with something and 
always keeps busy. Ginger Pi- 
azza is a sister of the Phi Mu 
Sorority and is President of 
the Panhellenic Council. 
Ginger is very involved with 
campus activities and has 
won the respect of her sis- 
ters, peers, and faculty. Both 
awards were presented dur- 
ing the Miss Venus Pageant 
during Greek Week. 



280 Greeks 



Mr. and Miss Greek 



Dan Boswel 



Rachel Hawkins 





The Mr. and Miss Greek 
award is determined by the 
sororities and fraternities 
through their respecti\e 
Greek Week chairperson. 
The chairperson nominates a 
faculty member, advisor or 
any person involved with 
Troy State that he or she 
might find particulary helpful 
to the Greek system. The 
nominees are voted on and 
the winners are recognized 
during the Miss Venus Pag- 
eant held early Spring quar- 
ter. This year's winners of the 
Mr. and Miss Greek awards 
were Dan Boswell and Ra- 
chel Hawkins. Dan Boswell is 
the Assistant Director of the 
Adams Center andRachel 
Hawkins is the Chapter Advi- 
sor of Chi Omega Soronu. 
The Mr. and Miss Greek \\ m- 
ners work with greeks dail\ 
and their patience and dedi- 
cation is appreciated by all. 



Creeks 281 




Greek Week is a spe- 
cial week which is 
recognized annually 
by all sororities and fraterni- 
ties on Troy State's campus. 
This week encourages athle- 
tic competition while pro- 
moting good sportsmanship. 
The events ranged from 
the Miss Venus pageant, in 
which the winner reigns over 
the exciting week, to the 
ever-so-competitive swim 
meet which brings an end to 
the athletic competition. 
Other events included dizzy 
bat, tug-of-war, mud volley- 
ball and musical ice chairs, to 
name a few. 

Top: Lisa Palmisano prepares to 
take a shot for the Alpha Gam's. 
Bottom: Julie Halcomb wins the 50 
yard dash for the KD's. 




282 Greek Week 



WEEK 




Crook Wook 283 




i 



1st place , 
2nd place 
3rd place 



Fraternities 

Lambda Chi Alpha 
Sigma Chi 
Delta Chi 

Sororities 



1st place . . . Phi Mu 
2nd place . . . Kappa Delta 
3rd place . . . Alpha Delta Pi 



Top Left: Carolyn Trathowen plays 
ping pong for the Alpha Cam's. 
Top Right: Troy Horton attempts to 
go over the bar in the high jump. 
Bottom Right: Brad McDowell 
shows that it takes concentration to 
play pool. 



284 Greek Week 







WEEK 






Top: Gary Blackwell and Daud 
Johnson go after each other in the 
arm wrestling competition. 
Bottom Left: falling down during a 
mud volleyball game can be a nasty 
experience. 

Bottom Right: The Delta Chi's show 
that it is pretty easy to run tied to- 
gether. 



Greek Week 285 




286 Greek Week 



WEEK 




Crook Work 28" 



1989-90 Miss Venus 



Bellamie Sauls 




Greek Week began with 
the annual Miss Venus Pag- 
eant. Thirty-one young la- 
dies representing various fra- 
ternities and sororities com- 
peted for the title of Miss 
Venus 1989-90 and for the 
honor of reigning over Troy 
State's Greek System for the 
next year. From the original 
thirty-one contestants, the 
judges chose the semi-fina- 
lists. After a walk by the re- 
maining contestants, the 
judges named the final five 
contestants. Each of the five 
women answered a question 
about Greek life at Troy 
State. The judges considered 
each girl's answer as well as 
her beauty and poise. 
Right: Miss Venus and her 
court will represent the 
Greek System during the fol- 
lowing year. 



288 Miss Venus 





Mary Elkins, First runner-up 




Gretchen Crim, Second runner-up 



\ enus 289 




290 Sports 




Sports 



It can be said that the sports season started in the dark, at least for those who 
attended the Livingston football game in TSU Memorial Stadium when a transform- 
er blew during the forth quarter with 12 minutes 41 seconds left to play. After it was 
decided that the lights in the main stadium could not be restored, the game was 
moved to the practice field. 

This event seemed to foretell of the dark losses that followed the sports programs 
at TSU. 

The images of the year in sports, some good and some bad, left TSU students with 
many lasting impressions. 




Derek Brown 
Heath DeRamus 
Cara English 
Tim Jacobs 
Ed Moseley 
Donald Norsworthy 
Photographers 



Heath DeRamus 
Dean Kervin 
Section Editors 



Garry Cannon 
Bert Kelly 
Contributing Editor 



Sports 291 



Laying New 




Foundations 




x 



It was a year of great possi- 
bilities and tragic realities 
for the Troy State Trojans. 
A year of missed opportuni- 
ties, strange occurrences and 
missed comrads. The pre- 
season pick to be Gulf South 
Conference champions and 
figured to play a part in the 
expanded format of the Divi- 
sion II playoffs, the Trojans 
wound up with a 4-6 record. 
Their first losing season since 
1982. The year of the "Black 
Triangle" was dedicated to 
three Trojan footballers who 
met untimely deaths during 
the off-season. The 1988 sea- 
son was darkened by the ab- 
sence of Sean Miller, Thomas 
Miller and Mark Chipman. 
Their numbers, 69, 85 and 94, 
have been retired for the re- 
mainder of their eligibility at 
Troy State. TSU started the 
season with those predic- 
tions in sight. In a season 
opening victory against 
Southeast Missouri State 
University the Trojans exper- 
ienced the longest game of 
their history, and used two 
fields in defeating the Indi- 
ans. Leading 19-13 in the 
fourth quarter, a steady rain 
caused a transformer to 



blow, leaving Memorial Sta- 
dium in darkness. After at- 
tempting to find another 
field in the area, the teams 
agreed to finish the contest 
on TSU's upper practice 
field. TSU's Tony Young 
scored the only points of the 
final 12:41 played on the 
practice field, and the Tro- 
jans notched their first victo- 
ry by a 23-16 margin. The 
Trojans opened up their 
conference slate against the 
Tigers of Livingston Universi- 
ty with a 28-14 \ictor\. Dur- 
ing that game, freshman 
kicker Brian Wilson connect- 
ed on four of six field goal 
attempts, setting a new TSU 
record. The Trojan special 
teams also pla\ed well, scor- 
ing a safety on a bad punt at- 
tempt and adding a touch- 
down when Gerrick Pi- 
mienta also recovered a bad 
snap and fell on it in the end- 
zone. Game three for the 
Trojans was the Super Bowl 
of small school maich-ups. 
The undefeated Trojans tra\ - 
eled to Orlando to plav the 
University of Central Florida 
Knights. The Trojans had dis- 
posed of the KnightS m the 

semi-finals ot the NCAA Di\. 




Football 293 



II playoffs a year earlier, and 
the fans and UCF players 
were set on revenge. A Div. II 
record crowd of 31,789 
turned out for the game, 
which had been built up by 
th media as a battle of Goli- 
aths. No. 1 ranked TSU versus 
No. 3 UCF. The Trojans are 
fired up as they built a 12-6 



half-time lead, on Bob God- 
sey's one yard TD run and a 
61 yard pass play to Kenny 
Edenfield. The Trojans kept 
up the momentum through 
the third period, as fullback 
Tony Young scored from the 
one, giving TSU the com- 
manding 18-6 lead. Mistakes 
and a hostile crowd then be- 



gan to take their toll. The 
Trojans, who had missed all 
extra point attempts, allowed 
the Knights to claim a 19-18 
lead midway through the 
fourth quarter. Facing a 
fourth and three at its own 
27, TSU attempted a fake 
punt which failed. Four plays 
later, UCF was in the end- 



zone again putting the game 
out of reach. The Trojans re- 
grouped with a sound 
thrashing of the West Geor- 
gia College Braves. The game 
belonged to the Trojans as 
they rolled up a 31-0 score 
during the first three quar- 
ters of the game. West Geor- 
gia's only points came in the 







294 Football 




fourth quarter, on .i -'J yard 
held goal, rhe i r <>j.ins added 

one mOI e I oik hdow n to 

make the final tally, rSLI 38- 
WGC J. The rrojan season 
began to go down hill atter 
ih.it rhe Blazei i of \ aldosta 
State v isited Memoi ial Stadi- 

um for I SL 's next < oritest, 

.md the rrojans jumped out 
early. On their fjrsl posse- 
sion, the Trojans moved 67 
yards in 13 plays, as Bob God- 
sey ran ovef tor the rD. I he 

two ( lubs swapped IDs and 

using an effe< live passing at- 
tack VSC took a 21-14 had 
into its locker room. The 
Blazers allowed TSU a safety 
in the final period, ending 
the game with a 21-16 victo- 
ry. It was the Trojans first 
conference loss in 20 games, 
and marked the first time 
since 1982 that the Blazers 
had defeated the Trojans. On 
Oct. 8, the Trojans traveled 
to Clinton, Mississippi to bat- 
tle the Choctaws of Missis- 
sippi College. The Trojans, 
who owned a two-game win 
streak against the Choctaws, 
but this game belonged to 




football 295 



MC. The Choctaws took the 
18-12 victory on the strength 
of TSU miscues. MC turned 
one TSU fumble into a 
touchdown, an interception 
into a field goal and notched 
a safety against the Trojans. 
The Trojans returned home 
with a 3-3 record and their 
backs up against the wall. If 



the Trojans hoped to make 
the playoffs, they could not 
lose another game. The game 
with Delta State was recog- 
nized as the kickoff for the 
American Textile Week in 
Alabama. It featured several 
thousand textile workers in 
attendance, sky diving be- 
fore the game and fireworks 



at halftime. The Trojans had 
won 11 of the previous 12 
meetings of the two schools 
before the Statemen escaped 
with a 24-21 victory in Me- 
morial Stadium. The States- 
men had an 0-3 conference 
record coming into the 
game, but the Trojans could 
not stop the DSU offense, al- 



lowing 378 yards total of- 
fense to the Mississippians. It 
was the first time since 1982 
that the Trojans had dropped 
three straight. The struggling 
Trojans were looking for a lit- 
tle respect when they jour- 
neyed to Florence on Oct. 
22. The Trojans faced the 
University of North Alabama 





fc=*C94*j*ii$ 



V st^Z 89 ,72, 17 3 < 

1 Mil .....I til I 



M 



Football Row One: Gary Black- 
well, Mitch Parnell, Kenny Edden- 
field, Morris Bankston, Jerald Travis, 
Jay Kiziol, Titus Dixon, Gerrick Pi- 
mienta, Bryan Jubbard, Ed Jughey, 
Glen Klava, Mark Storey, Daryl Blow 
and Robert Carter. Row Two: Doug 
Parrish, Freddie Taylor, Lonnie 
Chesteen, Stacy Stewart, Peter 
Grengus, Tony Jackson, Randy 
Barnes, Jimmy Bdrown, Willie Banks, 
Stewart Vines, Kenny Wagner, Bob 
Godsey, Julius Pittman, Reggie 
Hutchins, David Summerall and Phyl 
Brown. Row Three: Wesley Lucas, 
Shane Lucas, Shane Lewis, Pete 



Hives, Daniel Thurston, AL Harris, 
Terrace Johnson, Todd Tanner, 
Freddie Lopez, Damon West, Da- 
mon West, Derrick Ellington, Steve 
Summers, Duffey Cordrey, David 
Goebel, Randy Wilkes, Matt Brun- 
son and David Van Bushkirk. Row 
Four: Fred Singleton, Rodney Sin- 
gleton, Marcus Gray, Brent Williams, 
Chad Brackin, Vincent Ross, Ryan 
Poe, Brian Wilson, Tony Ward, Scott 
Parnell, Mike McCraw, Jim Logan, 
Mike Wilkes, Kevin Pettis, Kevin Kil- 
lingsworth, Tim Bolin and Tracey 
Linesberger. Row Five: Travis Lines- 
berger, Steve Leach, Dereck Elling- 






r- en ^ H _, £ j »- S. . 



4 47 ;76v;5 -65-55^33 



tm\ 



ton, Jeff Hall, Michael Herbert, Joe 
Hazgood, John Phillips, Jeff Wood- 
cock, Clay Trimble, Karl Smeltzer, 
Brian Lee, George Coker, Pat Palm- 
er, Chris Delick and Kevin Dean. 
Row Six: Doug Mimms, Mark Wil- 
liams, Lee Dean, Scott Collins, Scott 
Gamble, Danny Meyer, Russ Rod- 
gers, Terence Johnson, Jeff Sigman, 
Gregory McCain, Adam Daystrom, 
Jamie Day, Jason Murphey, Jason 
Chance, Bruce Wright and Tony 
Young. Row Seven: Derrick Moore, 
Antiuan Marsh, Jim Ward, Lance 
Sasser, Jason Belcher, Emanuel Liv- 
ingston, Robert Beasley, Trey Coley, 



Bill Morgan, Jason Jones and Ricky 
Johnson. Row Eight: Mason Gar- 
nett, David Tres, Michael Davids, 
Sissy Thomlin, Cary Rosen, Jim Mar- 
shall, Chris Howell, Johnb Lowe, Red 
Paulen, Cary Trant, Jarred Elliot, Mi- 
chael Worston, David Karenford, 
Scotty Corley, Jimmy Cray, Ronald 
Head and Will Jeffcoat. Row Nine: 
Stacey Maddox, Kevin Williams, Da- 
vid Slater, Ronald O'Toole, David 
White, Brent Van Nessen, Dave 
Stewart, Chuck Ash, Grey Stewart, 
Mike Turk, Chris Yeager, Clint 
McCroy and Noel Arens. 



296 Football 




where they pounded out a 
30-7 vie tory. The I rojans 
ook advantage o( eighl I ion 
urnovers in the i niversil 
rennessee-Martin. rhe Pa< - 
ers were tied tor the < onfer- 
ence lead .ittci dusting off 

[previously unbeaten Jark- 

sonville 5tate J1-24 on the 
preceeding weekend. Bad 
ue.it her was a part of the sea- 
son and this game was no dit- 
terent. After causing the 
lights to go out in game one, 
and causing a delay in the 
game against VSC, the rain 
hampered the spirits of the 
fans and made the playing 
surface a bit tricky. Dispite 
the weather, TSU struck firsl 
on 79 yard interception re- 
turn by cornerback Doug 
Mims. TSU went up 17-3 in 
the second quarter with just 
under 9 minutes to go before 
the bottom fell out. UTM 




Top: Fighting to move the ball, 

Steve Leach pushes through a Pacer 

mob. 

Bottom Left: "Hike!" Bob Godsey 

prepares to launch a pass. 

Bottom Right: Glen Klava prepares 

to punt the ball. 




Football 29" 




blasted back for three TDs in 
just over eight minutes to 
take a 24-17 advantage into 
halftime. The Trojans fought 
back, hitting two third quar- 
ter field goals which cut the 
Pacer lead to 24-23. They 
could manage nothing more, 
however, as UTM added a 
field goal and spoiled the 
Trojan Homecoming 27-23. 
The final contest of the sea- 
son for the Trojans was the 
annual grudge match against 
Jacksonville State. The Tro- 
jans met the 7-1 Gamecocks 
in Jacksonville in a game that 
wasn't even close. The Ga- 
mecocks snapped TSU's five 
year dominance in the series 
by thrashing the Trojans 31- 
3. The Trojans wound up the 
season averaging 231.3 yards 



rushing pre game and 101.2 
yards per game through the 
air. The Trojans scored an 
average of 21.5 points per 
game, while giving up 19.4 
per game to the opposition. 
Several TSU players were 
recognized for their out- 
standing performances, both 
on the field and off. Line- 
backer Gerrick Pimienta was 
named to the Associated 
Press Little All American sec- 
ond team and to the third 
team of "Don Hanson's Na- 
tional Weekly Gazette," a na- 
tional football publication. 
Cornerback Doug Mims was 
named to "Southern Maga- 
zines" Academic All-South 
Football Team. The Dothan 
sophomore carried a 3.78 
GPA. 




Top: Jumping for joy, Tony Jackson 


r 
r 

1 


i 


kv! 


E 


M 




i iff j i ~ • 






rejoices after a touchdown. 
Bottom: Randy Barnes runs the op- 
tion for first down. 


./ 




. % 


■■•A 




jt\[*' 


•jy"j 




■Kite 





298 Football 



Volleyball: 
A Smashing Success 



If you could judge how 
well a season went by a 
win/lose record, the Lady 
Tojans Volleball team had a 
spectacular season. They 
ended up with the best re- 
cord in the history of Troy 
State Volleyball, 31 wins and 
10 loses. Although they 
did not capture the confer- 
ence title, they were pleased 
with their overall season. The 
Lady Trojans opened their 
season by winning their own 
Lady Trojans Invitational. As 
the season progressed, they 
had many great victories, 
such as winning the FAMU 



Invitational Tournanment. 
The season ended abruptly 
after conference with the 
resignation of coach Ginger 
Sprague Lowe. Who will be 
greatly missed as will the 
graduating seniors, Natalie 
Wyrick, Jill Eastin, Jennie 
James. 

The team captains were 
senior Jennie James and ju- 
nior Dee Dee Taylor. The 
most valuable player was Pa- 
mela Carver. And the A 
Conference players from 
Troy State were Natalie Wyr- 
ick, April Goodwin, Pamela 
Carver. 



Top Right: Lady Trojans go for a 

block. 

Bottom Left: Pamela Carver prepares 

to spike the ball 

Bottom Right: A Lady Trojan dives to 

save the ball. 

Opposite Page: Top Left Moving in 

for a kill, Lady Trojans are on the 

move. 

Top Right: April Goodwin sets up 

spike for Pamela Carver. 





300 Volleyball 







Volleyball Team: Row One: Bill 
Gaulsphol; Asst. Coach, Ginger 
Lowe; Coach, |enni James, Natalie 
Wyrick and Jill Eastin. Row Two: Kay 



Phillips, Pamela Carver, Sandra 
Smith, April Goodwin, Jodi Pierice, 
Sissy Tomblin, DeeDee Taylor, Leslie 
Bennett, Kitty Reynolds, Melissa 



Morris, Chris Darnell and Tom 
Smith. 



Vollrsbdll 301 



Top Left: April Goodwin spikes the 
ball after Natalie Wyrick sets the ball 
up. 

Center Right: Serving is hard but, 
April Goodwin makes it look easy. 
Bottom Left: Pamela Carver is con- 
centrating on the ball. 





302 Volleball 




Nollrvbdll 303 



Troy State Basketball 
Making History 



Troy State began its 
1988-89 basketball 
season with four of the 
team members returning 
who advanced to the NCAA 
Division II Final Four last sea- 
son. In the Gulf South Con- 
ference pre-season polls, the 
Trojans were favored to win; 
but the Trojans ended the 
season in second place with a 
GSC league record of 11-5 
and an overall record of 18-7. 
The team's expectations 
for the 1988-89 season were 
high. The season opener was 
an exhibition game against 
the team from Ostersund, 
Sweden who were consid- 
ered the top rebounding 
team in Sweden. The real 
season began with two wins 
against Savannah State and 
Southern Indiana. The next 
game used this loss to inspire 
them to work harder and the 
next five games rendered 
victories. The spirit of the 
Trojans were dampened by 
the loss of their first GSC 
game but bounced back to 
win eight consecutive GSC 



battles. Unfortunately the 
last two GSC games were lost 
putting the trojans into sec- 
ond place. The team played 
hard and ended the season 
with a record of 13-0 home- 
town victories. Also mem- 
bers of the team (Darryl 
Thomas and Anthony Reed) 
were chosen All-GSC bas- 
ketball players with Darryl 
Thomas also capturing the 
Most Valuable Player award 
of the GSC. 

Darryl Thomas, senior for- 
ward, ends his second year 
career making history at Troy 
State University. He is the 
first TSU player to be named 
to the NCAA Division ll's Ail- 
American basketball team. 
For this honor his picture will 
be placed in the Tine Davis 
Field House Red Room. Dar- 
ryl has had an outstanding ca- 
reer. In 1987-88 he recieved 
the MVP in the regional 
tournament in Virginia and 
made All-Tournament team 
in the Final Four. The past 
two years he has led the GSC 
in scoring averaging 23 





Basketball Team: Row One: Darrly 
Thomas, Andy Davis, Neil Murray 
and Tony Holley. Row Two: Antho- 



ny Reed, Eddie Harris, Calvin 
McDowell, Matt Copeland, Wayne 
Hendley, Joe McCray and Mark 



Stringfellow. Not Shown: Head 
coach; Don Maestri and assistant 
coach; David Felix. 



• — 




te 



c, 




Bottom Left: Darrly Thomas shoots 
while a valdosta player tries to block 
him. 

Bottom Right: Calvin McDowell 
shoots for two. 

Opposite Page: Top Right: A Val- 
dosta player tries to block Darrly 



Thomas as he jumps and shoots. 
Boffom Left ^thon\ Reed jumps 
for two while Valdosta Pla\ers tr\ to 
block him. 

Bottom Right: Tom Hollos maneu- 
vers from Valdosta plaw^ 



N, 



Basketball 305 



points per game and in 1988- 
89 recieved the Gulf South 
Conference Most Valuable 
Player award. 

Senior center, Calvin 
McDowell, scored 11.3 
points and made 7.4 re- 
bounds per game. Anthony 
Reed, junior forward, led the 
team with a 61.0 shooting 
percentage and with his 9.0 
rebounds per game. Neil 
Murray averages 9.1 points 
per game and made 45 of 112 
three-pointers. Matt Cope- 
land made 130 in 25 games. 
His 255 career assists within a 
two year period made him 
the highest ranked two year 
player. 





306 Basketball 





Top Left: Darrl> Thomas and ■Xndv 
Davis block shot of a Liv mgslon pla\ - 
er. 

Top Right: Coach Don Maestri and 
assistant coach Da\id Felix concen- 
trate on the game. 
Bottom Led: Matt Copeland looks 
for someone to pass the ball to. 
Bottom Right ^nthon\ Reed slams 
the basketball into the hoop. 
Opposite Page Top Left Andv Davis 
concentrates on the basket 
Top Right: Tons Holle. 
two. 

Bottom: Anthon\ Reed shoots 
from the free throv* line 



Basketball 3CT 



Women's 



Basketball 




Row One: Shirley Williams. Row Two: Risa Green, Shea Moore, Amy Hisper, Angie Lowe, Chandra McClain, Brenda Ghee, Kimmie Reed and Angie Callans. 




308 Women's Basketball 




Starting off on the right 
foot posed a problem tor the 
Lady Trojans in the 1989 sea- 
son. Ankles, strained mus- 
( les, and broken fingers all 
interfered with the Trojans 
performance. "Many of the 
girls experienced injuries 
and that affected our playing 
ability," said Joyce Sorrell. 

The final rcord for the Lady 
Trojans was 8-17. Nine of 
these losses were by a mere 3 
point margin. "It was a disap- 
pointing season as far as re- 
cord but we had young play- 
ers and gained a lot of exper- 
ience", stated Coach Sorrell. 
The team played many top 
competitors in the Gulf 
South Conference, one of 
which was Delta State who 
won the Natioonal Chan- 
pionship in the league. West 
Georgia and jax State fin- 



ished in the top 20 teams as 
well. The team being 

young and having only two 
seniors, however, makes for a 
promising futur • 

The team was well round- 
ed in talent, yet the key play- 
ers in the Lady Trojans' sea- 
son were Angie Lowe, Bren- 
da Ghee and Amy Hisper. 
Angie Lowe of Gordon, Ala- 
bama averaged 16.4 points 
per game and led the team in 
scoring. She won the All Gulf 
South Conference for the 
second year in a row. Brenda 
Ghee, snatching 8.7 re- 
bounds a game led the team 
as well. Amy Hisper, a fourth 
year senior acquired 105 as- 
sists. Other players were 
Gayla Howard, Angie Callans, 
Shirley Williams, Chandra 
McClain and Risa Green. 




Top: Shea Moore goes for tv\o Bottom Right: Risa Green adds 

against Montevallo. two more points o the score tor 

Bottom Left: Shea Moore battles TSU. 
for the rebound. 



Women | Basketball 309 




310 Women's Basketball 




Women '<. Bd«.k««thall 311 



Take me out 



to the ball game!!! 



The Troy State University 
baseball team entered the 
1989 campaign with a lot of 
question marks. The team 
that had advanced to the 
South Central region tourna- 
ment the year before was 
faced with the loss of the en- 
tire infield, the starting 
catcher and the starting cen- 
terfielder. 

Head coach Chase Riddle 
also had a problem with 
pitching. The top three start- 
ers from 1988 were gone and 
the returning pitchers had 
little experience. 

The Trojans were also 
hampered by injuries as the 
start of the season ap- 
proached. Infielders Jorge 
Hernandez and Dirk Wil- 



liams were sidelined early as 
was David Whitaker who fig- 
ured to be a power hitter for 
the Trojans. 

Dispite all the question 
marks, the Trojans came out 
of the shoot ready. They 
swept a four game series 
from Ferris State to open the 
season and they compiled 
and 11-4 record going into 
their first conference game 
with West Georgia. 

After splitting with the 
Braves, the Trojans were 
hammered by Jacksonville 
State in a doubleheader at 
JSU. The Trojan's 1-3 confer- 
ence mark left them in the 
cellar of the GSC's Eastern 
Division. 

The Trojans returned to 





Top: Moe Davis makes the crucial 
play in the bottom of the 9th inning. 
Bottom Left: Junior Shumpert 
rounds first on his way to a double. 



Bottom Right: Even the best miss ev- 
ery now and then as Dirk Williams 
might say. 



'A* 



312 Baseball 




¥ > 



.ill 313 



form after splitting a home 
stand with Valdosta and 
sweeping West Georgia, 
those victories improved the 
Trojan's record to 21-10, re- 
turned the Trojans to second 
place in the east and set the 
stage for a critical double- 
header against Jacksonville 
State. 

The Gamecocks came into 
Troy's Pace Field ranked fifth 
in the nation with a 24-7 re- 
cord. Over 1200 fans 
watched as game one turned 
into a hitter's slug fest with 
the lead changing hands sev- 
eral times, before a late in- 
ning rally gave the Trojans an 
11-10 victory. Game two saw 
fine pitching performances 
by both teams. The Trojan's 
five game winning streak 
came to an end as TSU lost 1- 
on a no-hit performance by 
JSU's Jim Denison. The Tro- 
jans were then faced with a 
crucial doubleheader at Val- 
dosta State. 

In that final weekend of 
conference play, JSU was 
atop the Eastern Division 
standings with a 7-3 mark 
with the Trojans occupying 




Top: Bill Brive understands that to 
be the best you must always be alert. 
Bottom sequence: Even Lady Luck is 
a Trojan Fan. 















314 Baseball 




Top: Dirk Williams, Keith Black 
and Moe Davis take time out to dis- 
cuss last night's game. 
Bottom Left: Sliding into second is 
Dirk Williams. 

Bottom Right: Dirk Williams brings it 
home for another run. 




Baseball 315 




316 Baseball 




Oppoutf f'.w i<>i> raking a single 

is Dirk Williams alter < mi running the 
ball. 

Bottom Left: "Take it homo. Pal" is 
the thought of Moc Davis after 
tagging his opponent out on third 
Bottom Riffht: Coach Riddle t.ikes 
time out to confer vsith < <iu her Bri- 
an Dunn and pitcher Ward Thigpen 
about the defensive. 
This pa#e Brian Dunn adds a run to 
the score with the slide home. 




1989 Baseball Team Row One: Jon Maxwell, Junior Shumpert, Bob Love, Marty Barrett and Jorge Valeiu ia. Row Two: Brian Rilev Ward 
Thigpen, Ross Jinright, Dirk Williams, Keith Black, Rod Mcworther, Brian Dunn, Chris Sweatt and Ron Mueller Row Three: I 
Riddle, Coach Gene Dews, Scott Ates, Eric Dunn, Mark Dempsey, Mike Mahadv, Billy Bru e, Damn Beard, ( raig Me\et St 00 Boatner 
Stoney Melton, Marcuss Holland, Marc Russo and Coach Mark Smartt. 




Baseball 31" 




Top Right: Keith Black concentrates 
on the pitch just before hitting a 
home run. 

Top Left: Team work is respecting 
and appreciating others work as 
demonstrated by Ross Jenright and 
Billy Brice. 

Bottom: Sometimes it is not as easy 
as it looks, as shown in the faces of 
Keith Black and John Maxwell. 
Opposite Page: Bottom: Coach 
Chase Riddle directs Junior Shum- 
pert on the best plan of action. 





318 Baseball 




the sec ond pla< e slot ,it 5-5. 
wgc and Valdosta were 

pulling u[) the ( ellar with 3-5 

m.irks, hut before the week- 
end was ovei those standings 

would change. Valdosta 
ripped the Trojans in game 
one 11-2. The game was ne\ - 
er in douht as the Blazers 
scored eight times in the first 
inning. Game two was a 
tightly contested affair until 
the sixth inning. The Trojans 
fought to a 3-2 lead in the top 
half of the inning, before Val- 
dosta exploded for seven 
runs in the bottom of the 
sixth to win 9-3. The losses 
sent the Trojans to the bot- 
tom of the Eastern Division 
standings. At the same time, 
West Georgia defeated Jack- 
sonville to move into a sec- 
ond place tie with Valdosta. 
The Trojans finished out 
the regular season with 
games against a couple of 
Mongomery colleges, end- 
ing their season with a 29-16 
record. The Trojans were 19- 
8 at home and 7-7 on the 
road. They were 3-1 at neu- 
tral ballparks. They were 3-1 



against I Jivision I s( hools, 1 i- 
11 .iKamst Division II schools 
and 1 J-4 .i^.tinst VMA oppo- 
nents 

This marked the first time 
sine e 1982 thai tin- Iroj.ins 
did not make it to NCAA Re- 
gional Tournament play. The 
team's final ranking of 24th 
w.is the lowest siru e ( hase 
Riddle took over the TSU 
program in 1979. 

Shortstop Dirk Williams 
led the Trojans at the plate 
compiling a .410 batting 
average. Williams hit 11 dou- 
bles with 34 RBIs and 38 runs 
scored. Left fielder Scott 
Ates hit .344 on the season 
and Brain Dunn batted .340 
with five home runs. First 
baseman Ross Jinnght tied 
Dunn for the most round 
trippers with five. 

TSU hit .311 as a team and 
had an impressive fielding 
percentage of .952. The 
team's earned run average 
was 5.03. 

Marcus Hooland led the 
Trojans pitching staff with a 
3-1 record and a 3.30 ERA. 




B.imMI 319 




320 Women's Softball 



Women's Softball 



Opposite Page Kelley Simpson pre- 
pares to hit a home run. 
This Page: Top Left: Natalie Wyrick 
goes for it as she plays outfield. 

Top Right: April Goodwin strikes 

the opponent out as she slides into 

base. 

Bottom Left: Jenny Braswell gives it 

her all as she plays a base. 




n v sottball 321 



PLAY 

BALL !! 



Under the direction of 
new head coach Mickey Ja- 
cobs, the Troy State Wom- 
en's Softball team is exper- 
iencing a year of reinforcing 
strong foundations. The Tro- 
jans started the year out with 
a strong showing at the West 
Georgia Invitational where 
they won three and lost four. 
The leading batter was Junior 
Dee Dee Taylor and in sec- 
ond was freshman Michelle 
Weston. Taylor also leads in 
home runs. The team faced 
many barriers with a new 
coach, limited pitching and 
many players who had never 
faced a fast pitch game. The 
competitive nature of the 
Gulf South Conference pro- 
vided the Trojans with many 
surprises. Many of the play- 
ers were placed in key posi- 
tions that they had never 



played before. Michelle 
Weston, who had never 
played fast pitch, was faced 
with the challenge of playing 
catcher. The Trojans kicked 
off the season with Hunting- 
don College where they won 
8-3 then lost 10-0. The Tro- 
jans then played Jacksonville 
State in which they lost both 
games 2-1 and 9-2. Dee Dee 
Taylor and Jenny Braswell 
both hit home runs against 
Jacksonville State. The team 
consisted of seniors Jeannie 
Braswell, Natalie Wyrick, Tra- 
cey Wright and Amanda 
Tucker; Juniors Dee Dee 
Taylor, Pam Goodwin, April 
Goodwin, Alice Johnson and 
Kelley Simpson, as well as 
Sophomore Erin Slattery and 
Freshmen Michelle Weston 
and Kelley Shotwell. 




Top: Jeannie Braswell Takes off to- 
ward first base after a hit. 
Bottom Left: Natalie Wyrick lets the 
ball pass her by. 

Bottom Right: Kelley Shotwell goes 
for a hit. 




322 Women's Softball 




Top: Jeannic Braswell prepa- 
tag an opponent out 
Bottom Women'-, Softball Team 
Row One: Pam Goodwin, Amanda 
Tucker, Alice Johnson, Dee Dee 
Taylor and Kelley Simpson Row 
Two: Mickey Jacobs, K' 
Shotwell, Jeannie Braswell, Michelle 
Weston, Natalie VVynck, April 
Goodwin and Trainer Amy Bo- 
hanon. 




Women's Softball 323 



Tennis: 

Bouncing Back 



The 1989 Troy State 
University men's ten- 
nis team ended its sea- 
son in sixth place in the Gulf 
South Conference, Paxon is 
hopeful that next year will 
turn out better. 

"Within the conference, 
we've been very compe- 
tive," said Paxson. "We've 
held up pretty well, with 
pretty close scores." 

"Next season, we have a lot 
of people coming back, so 
we could be alot tougher," 
he said. 

The returning players will 
include the teams top three 
performers of last season: 
Mark Rose, Einar Sigurgeirs- 
son, and John Miller. 

The Trojans Finished with 
an overall record of seven 
and eleven for the season. 





Top Left: Mark Rose shows good 
form as he prepares to serve. 
Top Right: Returning a shot, Ross 
Williamson uses his backswing. 
Bottom: Tennis Team: Row One: 
Tommy Dade, Chad Folger, Eniar Si- 
gurgeirsson and John Miller. Row 
Two: Coach Duane Paxson, Ross 
Williamson, Jeff Martin, and Mark 
Rose. 



324 Tennis 




Tenn 






Men's & Women's Track 




Track Team: Row One: Robert Lam- liams, Brent Dewar, Kenneth Grade, Rodney, Jon Brennen, Steven Og- 

bert, Nick Wolf, Pedros Agomie, Ke- Pierre Joseph, George Bullard, Reg- burn, Mary Duffy and Mike Thomp- 

vin Washington. Row Two: Melinda gie McCray. Row Three: Wendi son. Not Shown: Jennifer lozzie, 

Williams, Bill Hibbard, Melissa Wil- Monconica, Ken Wilson, Grace Catherine Reed and Rick Stetson; 



coach. 



The Troy State Universi- 
ty Track Team has had 
an exceptional year. 
The team has placed well in 
all events. According to Rick 
Stetson Junior James and Bill 
Hibbard will have the best 
chance at qualifying for the 
national meet. 

Coach Stetson expects the 
team to place in the top ten 



at nationals, which will be 
held in Hampton, Virginia 
May 25-27. An advantage for 
Troy State is that most of the 
team returned. Troy will be- 
gin looking to have all 
Americans on the Squad next 
season. This will show in the 
amount of the team wins for 
the Trojans in the next three 
years. 





326 Track 




Trdc 



Cross Country 




Cross Country Team: Row One: 

Robert Lambert, Nick Wolf, Pedros 
Agomie, Kevin Washington. Row 
Two: Yul Provancha; Coach, Melin- 
da Williams, Bill Hibbard, Melissa 



Williams, Brent Dewar, Kenneth 
Cracie, Pierre Joseph, George Bill- 
iard, Reggie McCray. Row Three: 
Wendi Monconica, Ken Wilson, 
Grace Rodney, Jon Brennen, Steven 



Ogburn, Mary Duffy and Mike 
Thompson. Not Shown: Jennifer 
Lozzie and Catherine Reed. 



The cross-country team 
for the fall season was 
definitly strong and 
showed great promise. 

A big change for the sea- 
son was a new coach, Yul 
Provancha. Provancha gave 
new spirit to the team, 
coaching them to a third 
place finish in their first meet 



of the season. This streak 
continued with such wins at 
Dartmouth in October with a 
fourth place finish. 

This upsweep in cross- 
country gave Troy State's 
track program the boost they 
needed to rebuild the Cross 
Country Program at Troy 
State University.. 





328 Cross Country 




Cross Countr\ 



Fall Intramurals 



The fall intramural sea- 
son for 1988 was dif- 
ferent from any other 
in Troy State's history. This 
year saw the birth of girl's flag 
football, billiards, and swim- 
ming. Another change this 
fall was that non-Greek orga- 
nizations were allowed to 
compete in the games 
against the Greeks. 

One of these non-Greek 
teams, the Bomb Squad, 
went all the way to the men's 
flag football rankings and was 
the overall winner for the 
season. The Kappa Deltas 
were the big winner in the 
women's flag football com- 



Intramural Champions:Top Left: Phi 
Mu Swim Team: Kelly Clifton, Sisie 
Skrowron, Julene Bush and Judy 
Bell. Not Shown: Stephanie Harper 
and Robin Riggs. 

Middle Center: Bomb Squad Foot- 
ball Team: Kurt Thomas, Royce 
McKinney, Robert Langford, Erik 
Brooks, Wendell Frazier, Andrew 
Sewell, Ira Fluett, Erik Pennington, 
Warrick Pettus, William Scott, Ray 



petition. 

On the volleball court, the 
team from Sigma Alpha Epsi- 
lon took the title for men 
while the Eliminators won in 
the women's league. 
In the newly formed swim- 
ming competition, the Phi 
Mu won for the ladies as the 
aptly-named Sharks domi- 
nated in the men's games. 

Changes in this fall's com- 
petion were welcome 
among Troy State's students. 
The new games were great 
spirit boosters and are sure to 
be standards for the years to 
come. 



Ballard and Kelly Pollard. 
Bottom Right: Kappa Delta Joanna 
Brantley Charges to strip the flag of 
Company L quarterback Sonya Har- 
old. 

Bottom Left: Kappa Delta Football 
Team: Liz Williams, Julie Halcomb, 
Tammy Livingston, Beth Hoffman, 
Juliane Edelberg, Belinda Rusnak, 
Jana Bradshaw, Melanie Connell, 
Stephanie Morin and Leigh Green. 




AAJftAA 




330 Fall Intramurals 








4$ 5<* 




Top Right: Swimming became a new 
part of the intramural program. 
Bottom Right: Delta Chi Robert 
Wagoner reaches for the flag of BSU 
player, David Curenton. 
Bottom Left: Intramuial female Vol- 
leyball Champions Eliminators: 
Brenda Cobb, Glory Gilbert, Lisa 
Jenkins, Feda Moore, Wanda 
Moore, Kelly Shotwell, Wanda 
McCrimon, Sherwanna King, Melin- 
da Williamson, Melissa Williamson 



and Angela Fitch. 

Not Shown: Male Intramural Swim- 
ming Champions Sharks: Jimmy 
Babbs, David Davis, Claude Tudor, 
Brent Harwood, Mike Celka, Chris 
Celka and lacie Dean. 
Male Intramural Volleyball Champi- 
ons: Sigma Alpha Epsilon: Rob Ad- 
ams, Richard Ffice, Guy Preston 
Vance Beck, Jon Findlater, Dennis 
Tusdel, Mark Wilder. 



Fall Intramurals 331 



Winter Intramurals 



Winter Intramurals 
offered some 
great activities this 
year. These activities includ- 
ed: 5 on 5, 3 on 3, 2 on 2 
basketball, hot shot, free 
throw, and table tennis sin- 
gles and doubles. There was a 
good turn out this year for all 
activities. 1989 Winter Quar- 
ter Champions were the fol- 
lowing: basketball 5 on 5- 
Fire & Alpha Gam, basketball 



3 on 3 - Triple Threat & Soft- 
ball Team, basketball 2 on 2- 
Derek Brown & Eve Motley, 
hot shot & free throw - Rich- 
ard Hice, table tennis (sin- 
gles) - Adam Byrd & Eve 
Motley and table tennis 
(doubles) - Gautam Advani/ 
Govind Menon & Eve Mot- 
ley/Scotti Summers. Con- 
gratulations to all these win- 
ners. 



© 








332 Winter Intramurals 




Top: Sigma Chi and Night Court 
players concentrate on the game. 
Bottom Left: KD Liz Williams con- 
centrates on her next move. 
Bottom Right: Sigma Chi Mark 
Alessandroni blocks Jay of Night 
Court. 
Opposite Page: Top Right: Intramu- 



for ball during tipoff. 
Bottom Left: Sigma Chi Alfred 
Fletcher shoots for extra points dur- 
ing free throw. 

Not Shown: Intramural Champions: 
Triple Threat: Daniel Tutanelln 
Steve Leach, Andrew s ( - ; \,.|| and 
U.iruk PettUS Softball Team: \pnl 



ral Champion: Fire: Doug Mims 

Bob Godsey, Kenny Edenfield, 

Lance Sassar, Phil Brown, Kenny 

Wagoner, Robert Carter, Daniel Tu- 

furiello and lav Ko/iol. 

Center Left: KD and High Fives play 

a good game. 

Center Right: High Fives and KD go 



Goodwwi kcll<'\ ShotweJI, Natalie 

Wynck and Kelly Simpson. Alpha 

Gam: IcnKn C tSMd) I 1/ Brannen. 

Peggy Duncan, Maria Duncan. Kan 

Klingzing, lackie Lalka Melissa Mor- 

ril kelli Murphy, Beth Sumner 

Carolyn Trathowen. lean Bri\y4,|v,„ r ■„. , , , , 

\Tlnter Intramurak Hi 



Spring Intramurals 



Spring intramurals of- 
fered some great activi- 
ties this year. These ac- 
tivities were the following: 
Softball(mens, womens, 
corec), Tennis, Track, wiffle 
ball tourn. and golf. There 
was a good turn out this year 



for all activities. 

Also this quarter the over- 
all winners were announced. 
The overall winners were 
Kappa Delta and Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. Congratulations to 
both these and all intramural 
winners. 




©i 




hf^vFl 



\ 




%: i£-'S^VL-i> 







334 Spring Intramurals 





Opposite I 

TopRlghi Ovenll-KD Belinda Rus- 
1 1 riday I »nn Huff I 
ii . (ennifei Dyk< immy 

I Ivingston, l.in.i Bf.ntti.rA 
Streets, Beth Hoffman, lulu- Hal- 
comb and Melanie Connel 
/.inn-- Snow i die P< ndelton, lill 
Cirdner, Bobbie Bowen r ra< . John- 
I isj Roo- 
ten Beth L< • ''in, Christi 

^.i b r i n j HartZOg, I isj 

i.H ."T s ic Reeve chdHd i 

and Ginger Burton 
Centei /<•" ( ni/rn/o^ Tanya Ar- 
rington, Man Bu-gler, Sandy Crutch - 
Held, rim Meredith, Mark Miller, 
Sonya Harcll, Tommy Dade. Jil 
McFater, Rae Ann . and 

Mike Shoemaker. 
Center Righf.Overall-SAl 
Crice, Mark Wilder, Pat Jordan, 
Tommy Lockett, Frank DiCesare and 
Mark Miklos. Carson McRery, Scott 
Standafor, Matt Mingus, Anthony 
Slaughter, Randel Curtis, Richard 
Hice, Mike Johnson, Ed Parish, John 
Findlater, Danny Loe, Ronnie Ells- 
worth, Joe Dimisa, Chris \\ ilson and 
Dr. Ratcliffe 

Bottom Left: Prime Time Adam 
Byrd, Norris Brooks, Chris Celka, 
Mike Dahl, Darren Hipps, Eric 
Howes, Wesley Lucas, Dexter Oden, 
Mark Stringfellow, Charles Tipton, 
Claude Tudor, Danny Tufariello, 
Wade Wright and Kevin Spivey. 
Bottom Right: Bad Girls: Angie Cal- 
lans, Gwendolyn Davison, Renee 
Frederick, Gayla Howard, Lisa Jen- 
kins, Saundra Madison, Freda 
Moore, Shea Moore, Wanda Moore, 
Teresa Stone, Kimberlon Whet- 
stone, Shirley Williams, Anissa v 
ait, \ernessa Watts, Hope Jackson 
and Toni Pitrulle. 




Top Left: Lambda Chi Bubba Rich- 
burg digs in for the sumi; 
Top Right Lambda Chi Kevin Msup 
draws back to pitch the ball 
Center Pi kapp Kelvin Maddox 
knows that the action is hot 




spring Intramur.- 



Cheerleaders 




Our Trojan "messengers of 
spirit" are something that we 
are very proud of at TSU. 
They put in many long after- 
noons of practice in the sup- 
port of the athletic program. 
Accompanied by the ever 
friendly Trojan mascot, T- 
ROY, they lead Trojan fans in 
giving our team the rip-roar- 
ing support they truly de- 
serve. 

TSU cheerleaders are cho- 
sen each Spring at tryouts. 
Seven men and seven ladies 
are selected to represent 
TSU as its "spirit chanellors". 
The elite, then work hard to 
be SPIRITAT ITS BEST, some- 
thing we feel they have truly 
accomplished. 



Top: Keith Weeks and Heather 
Huber demonstrate a hand stand. 
Bottom: Neal Nash and Greta Kantor 
take a break from their strenuous 
cheers. 





. 







336 Cheerleaders 




Top: T-ROY leads Trojan fans in a 

( heer. T-ROY is portrayed by Muffy 

Edelberg. 

Bottom: Demonstrating a pyramid 

of spirit, the cheerleaders entertain 

Trojan fans. 




Cheer lead* 




Spirit At 
Its Best 



Top: Jean Brown and Greg 

Willis. 

Bottom: Heather Huber 

and Keith Weeks. 





Cheerleaders: Amy Smith, Don 
McGhee, Ellie Jane Sharpe, Chuck 
Boggs, Daune Adams, Robert Ram- 
sey, Heather Huber, Keith Weeks, 



Jean Brown, Greg Willis; Co-Cap- 
tain, Teresa McKinney, Neal Nash, 
Greta Kantor; Captain, and Jimmy 
Babb. 



338 Cheerleaders 




WT^ 




Top Left: Teresa 
and Neal \ash. 
Top Right: Greta 
Jimmy Babb. 



McKinney 
Kantor and 







Middle: Daune Adams and 
Robert Ramsey. 
Bottom Right: Ellie Jane 
Sharpe and Chuck Bo^v 
Bottom Lett: Amy Smith and 
Don McGhee. 




C hoorlc.uii 



Men's 




Top Right: Jeff Skipper putts on the 
green. 

Middle Left: Mark McVay watches 
to see where his ball lands on the 
green. 

Bottom Right: Barry Alexander 
blasts from the sand to land on the 
green. 

Opposite Page: Top left: Jeff Good- 
man sets up his putt. 
Top Right: Jeff Skipper shows us his 
technique. 

Bottom: Mark McVay shows good 
form. 






r^*-» 



I ■ W 



340 Golf 




The Troy State Trojan 
golf team had an out- 
standing season this 
year. The Trojans, who are 
the nine-time defending 
GSC Champions, faced their 
stiffest test in recent years. 
"The divisional race is getting 
a lot tighter," said team cap- 
tain Mike Morton, a four- 
year starter. 

"We're going to have to 
really play good this year," he 
added. "There are four or 
five teams that have a good 
shot at winning it (as opposed 
to one or two teams in recent 
years), but if we play up to 
our potential we should 
win." 

The golfers participated in 
the following tournaments: 
Wynlakes, Southeast Loui- 
sianna Invitational, Southern 
Junior-Senior, Southeastern 
Collegiate, Tampa Invita- 
tional and in the Gulf South 
Conference Championship. 
They won the Tampa Invita- 
tional and were a runner-up 
in the Southeast Louisianna 
Invitational and the South- 
eastern Collegiate. In other 
tournaments the Trojans 
placed third and seventh. 




The Troy State Universiu 
golf team has seven team 
members qualifying to go to 
the Gulf South Conference 
during the year. The seven 
team members are Mike 
Wright, Joe Shahady, Mike 
Morton, Preston Wilson, 
Brad Champion, Jeff Good- 
man and Barry Alexander. 
Only five team members will 
be able to compete. During 
the 87-88 year, Mike Wright, 
Mike Morton, Brad Champi- 
on, Robbie Cotton and Jim 
Gottschall led Tro\ State 
University to victory in the 
Gulf South Conference 
Championships. 



Golf 341 






Top Left: Barry Alexander watches 

to see where his ball lands on the 

green. 

Top Right: Jeff Goodman works out 

his next shot. 




342 Golf 




Top Left: Preston Wilson uses good 

torm on the putting green. 

Top Right Mike VN right matches as 

Joey ShahaoS putts on the gr. 

Middle Left: Brad Champion putts 

one in 

\1iddlr Right Chad Collier putts 

and sinks the ball. 

Bottom left: Chad Collier sho. 

his putting technu; 

Bottom Right Iocs shahads shows 

us good form. 



Col< 343 







344 Women's Golf 



Women's Golf 



Opposite Page: Lynn Albery hits her 

ball out of the sand trap. 

Top Left: Sue Sucansky gleams vMth 

pride after a great tee. 

Top Right: Chris Bowen strugw 

get her ball out of the sand pit 

Bottom Left: Kelli Sanders gi. 

her best as she tees off 

Bottom Right Christa Johnston gets 

ready to make a hole in one. 




Women | Golf 345 




Row One: Coach Chris Force, Kelli 
Sanders and Kristie Bowen. Row 



346 Women's Coif 




Top Left: Chris Bowen exits the 
sand trap six < essflllly. 
Top Ri^ht: Kelli Sanders K"'ts ready 
to tee off. 

Bottom Left: Chnsta Johnston at- 
tempts a hole in one. 




I ed by Coach Chris f on e 
and team captain Lynn Al- 
brey, the women's golf team 

had a very sue ( essful 

rhe team started their Fall 

season oft with the I lorida 
State University Invitational 

September 24, 1988. There 
were Tj tt.ims in the Dh I 

tournament with T.S.U. be- 
ing the only Div. II s( hool 
From there the Trojans par- 
ticipated in the Lady Tiger In- 
vitational at Memphis State 
University October 2-4, 
1988. Again T.S.U. was the 
only Div. II s( hool in the 
tournament. The team fin- 
ished their Fall season off 
with the Tiger-Tide Invita- 
tional sponsored by the Uni- 
versity of Alabama and Au- 
burn University at the Seas- 
cape Resort in Destin, FL. 
T.S.U. finished 12th out of 18 
and was the only Div. II 
school competing. Troy 
State kicked their Spring sea- 
son off with the Hudson In- 
dustries Invitational Marc h 
3-5 at the Country Club of 
Alabama in Eufaula, AL. From 
there it was the Louisiana 
State University Invitational 
in Baton Rouge, March 17- 
19. Then the team competed 
in the Gulf Shores Invita- 
tional April 14-16. Freshman 
standout Kelli Sanders from 
Montgomery, AL. scored 75, 
76, 80 and finished in the top 
ten players of the tourna- 
ment. The team will finish 
the season with the National 
Championship Tournament 
in Fayetteville, NC. The Lady 
Trojans ended the year 
ranked No. 1 in the nation. 



Women s GoM 




348 Administration 




Administration 



Thanks, Dr. and Mrs. Adams! was the theme of the year in which to remember the 
accomplishments and growth that was headed by the retiring Chancellor and his 
beloved wife, Dorothy. The years of the Adams' administration brought with it many 
changes; the most important of these was the expanding of Troy State College into 
the Troy State University System. This expansion took a small teachers' college and 
turned it into a world wide university system with campuses located in the United 
States, Western Europe and, as of this year, in the Pacific Region. 

Chancellor Ralph Adams in just 26 years has redefined the meaning of lasting 
impressions. 




Derek Brown 
Heath DeRamus 
Cara English 
Tim Jacobs 
Ed Moseley 
Donald Norsworthy 
Photographers 



Jennifer Sohn 
Section Editor 



^dmini'.U.ition 349 



RALPH WYATT ADAMS 

CHANCELLOR 



July 1, 1985, Dr. Ralph W. 
Adams was named Chancel- 
lor of the Troy State Univer- 
sity System by the Board of 
Trustees. Dr. Adams has 
served as President of Troy 
since October 1, 1964. At the 
time, Troy State was a small 
state-supported institution 
with barely 2,000 students; 
now the TSU system has 
13,577 students attending 
classes on campuses located 
in Alabama, Arkansas, Cuba, 
Europe, Florida, and Georgia. 

In academics alone, when 
Dr. Adams became Presi- 
dent, Troy State was offering 
its students an opportunity 
to earn degrees in only four 
areas of study. Today, it is 
possible to earn degrees in 
forty-eight areas of study. 

In education circles, he is 
known as an innovator. His 
"University Without Walls" 
concept of taking education 
to the people has been en- 
vied and emulated through- 
out the nation. 



A native of Samson, Ala- 
bama, Dr. Adams holds 
earned degrees from Bir- 
mingham-Southern and the 
University of Alabama. He 
also did post-graduate work 
at Princeton, Harvard, and 
Oxford University in Europe. 

He was elected to the Ala- 
bama Academy of Honor in 
1977 and designated the first 
Citizen of the Area by the 
Chamber of Commerce in 
1979. 

Dr. Adams married the for- 
mer Dorothy Kelly in Sep- 
tember 1942. Mrs. Adams re- 
cieved her B.A. degree from 
Troy State University in 1971. 
Mrs. Adams is an Honorary 
Miss TSU. Both Dr. and Mrs. 
Adams are members of Phi 
Kappa Phi, Omicron Delta 
Kappa and Mortar Board. 

Chancellor and Mrs. Ad- 
ams have three children: 
Ralph Wyatt Jr., Kelly Cle- 
ments (Mrs. James B. Allen, 
Jr.) and Samuel. 









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350 Chancellor Adams 





- 



.nccior AiUim JS1 



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1<^ 

0\t r 



Dr. Adams and George Wallace pose in front of 
Dr. Adam's boarding house, in which they grew to 
become very close friends. 




Humble. Unassuming. Quiet. These 
are some of the words that have been 
used to describe Ralph Adams. On first 
meeting him, a new aquaintance may be 
surprised at his warm humility, and his 
slight frame. Are you sure this is the man 
who has literally transformed a small 
teachers' college into the state's third 
largest university system in the last 
twenty-five years? 

But he has done this, forging ahead 
with the motive of improving higher 
education and placing this little univer- 
sity on the proverbial map. And he has 
done so with uncanny panache and in- 
credible class. 

Even in his youth, Ralph Adams ex- 
hibited untiring industry. He worked in 
the school dairy at Lyman Ward to pay 
his expenses. At Birmingham-Southern, 
he sold magazine subscriptions to fund 
his education. Then as a law student at 
Alabama, he bought a house for $1500 
and turned it into a boarding house for 
fellow students. In this enterprise, he 
met George Wallace, and through him, 
Dorothy Kelly, who later became his 
wife. Adams and Wallace practiced law 
together; Adams became a judge in 



Tuscaloosa county, and then entered 
the Air Force. Through his experience 
in the service, including his positions as 
professor and dean at the Air University 
Law School, Adams gained knowledge 
of and interest in the educative process. 




Dr. Adams thanks Governer Guy Hunt on being 
the guest speaker for the Centennial Commence- 
ment Exercises. 



His enduring friendship with George 
Wallace eventually afforded him exper- 
ience with state govermental affairs, as 
Wallace appointed him to a cabinet po- 
sition in his first administration. 

Such is the makeup of this man, the 



dean of college and university presi- 
dents in Alabama. He is a composite of a 
disciplined military man, well-read edu- 
cator, experienced politician, analytic 
attorney and judge, accomplished ad- 
ministrator, loving father, devoted hus- 
band, and ever the student among stu- 
dents. He loves to eat lunch at the 
Country Kitchen and drink cane juice in 
the fall. Early in the morning, surround- 
ed by sections of The Wall Street Jour- 
nal scattered on the floor of his new 
office in the building that bears his 
name, with a cup of coffee, he insists on 
pouring himself, there in the midst of all 
the Chippendale furniture framed by a 
bay-window view of the awakening 
campus, is a study in contrast. 

In his first report to the Alabama Leg- 
islature after Troy State was named a 
university, Dr. Adams said, "the univer- 
sity has no needs in and of itself — the 
needs of Troy State University are the 
needs of the people it serves." He went 
on to declare that Troy State was com- 
mitted to excellence, for "... to render 
less than the optimum to any one seg- 
ment of the university is to reduce the 
totality of learning. 



352 Chancellor Adams 



. 







\ 



— * 



-urf 





Dr. Adams poses with Wallace Malone, Ronald 
Reagan and Jeremiah Denton at a reception in 
Montgomery, Alabama. 



Were those statements made more 
than 20 years ago the products of Ralph 
Adams' dreams, or were they a prelude 
to a well-planned, calculated effort on 
the part of a shrewd businessman? 

Conscientious Adams-watchers will 
probably conjecture that it's a bit of 
both. Look at the campus in 1964: Troy 
State College. Most of the 1,600 stu- 
dents were education majors. A few 
business majors here and there. No re- 
medial programs, no tutors. One admis- 
sions counselor. A football team no one 
outside of Troy had ever heard of. Was 
there a band? Temporary housing in a 
muddy field behind Bibb Graves Hall. A 
one-room student center. No on-cam- 
pus apartments, no fraternities. One 
honor society. Look now: for lack of 
space, here suffice it to say that Troy 
State offers its students every amenity 
of its larger sister schools, without the 
throngs of people clamoring to use 



At the eve of his announced retire- 
ment, Dr. Adams is the oldest college 
president/chancellor in Alabama, both 
in terms of age and in length of service. 
Why has he lasted so long? To pose this 
question to the Chancellor himself will 
no doubt yield a humorous answer. 

Our Dr. Adams has every right and 
reason to express his pride. He is suc- 
cessful in his personal life as well as in his 
professional life. He is the chief execu- 
tive officer of a public institution with 
forty locations and service to more than 
14,000 people, including students and 
staff. His name is on scholarships, bro- 
chures, and even on the lips of those 
who emulate him. 

Mrs. Dorothy Adams has been by Dr. 
Adams' side, ever the supportive wife, 
through all of these years. She has add- 
ed to the college community by being a 
gracious hostess, opening their home to 
the students and townspeople on nu- 
merous occasions. Any time she could 
sing the praises of TSU, she has been the 
most effective spokeswoman. For years 
she taught in the English department 
and has been retired (if you can call it 
that) for several years. She can be found, 
busy as can be, doing all the things peo- 
ple do in their retirement, plus volun- 
teer work, visiting and caring for sick 
friends, and still talking about the vir- 
tures of Troy State. 

What will Troy State do without 
Ralph Wyatt Adams, its guide and men- 
tor for a quarter century, and his active 
wife, Dorothy? This question is tanta- 
mount in the minds of those who will 



Having been President for 25 years o( !<■ 

100 year existence, Dr. Adams proudly display s his 

own centennial edition liscence plate 

remain in the new administration. But 
those who have known Dr. Adams over 
the years have known that he has sur- 
rounded himself with absorbing, inno- 
vative minds, for, in his words, "a great 
university is a collection of greal 
minds." Perhaps some of those great 
minds will carry on the tradition of ex- 
cellence for which Ralph Adams has 
been purveyor and chief advocate. 




Dr. Adams with President George Bush when he 

was at TSU in 1979, campaigning 

dent 



C ham ellor \dams 353 



Troy State University 
Board of Trustees 




Troy State University Board of Trustees: Row One: R. Douglas Hawkins and Robert E. Kelly. Row Two: Allen Owen III, 
Roy Gamble, Harold R. Collins and John A. Teague. Row Three: Dr. Ralph W. Adams, Deborah McGill, Wallace D. 
Malone, Linda M. Maynor and C.J. Hartley. 



Governor Guy Hunt 

Governor Guy Hunt was 
born on June 17, 1933, in 
Cullman County, Alabama. 
He was raised on a farm near 
Holly Pond. He graduated 
from Holly Pond High School 
in 1950 and a year later on 
February 25 he married the 
former Helen Chambers. 

Governer Hunt and First 
Lady of Alabama Helen Hunt 
have four children: Pam 
Hunt, Mrs. Sherrie Williams, 
Keith Hunt, and Mrs. Lynn 
Gaddis. 

Governor Hunt served in 
the U.S. Army during the Ko- 
rean conflict as part of the 
101st Airborne Division and 



354 Board of Trustees 



the 1st Infantry Division. 
Since then, Governor Hunt 
has served a Probate Judge in 
Cullman County, an appoin- 
tee in the Reagan Adminisr- 
tation as State Executive Di- 
rector of the Agriculture Sta- 
bilization and Conservation 
Services of the United States 
Department of Agriculture, 
and many charitable organi- 
zations. 

Governor Hunt became a 
member of Mt. Vernon 
Primitive Baptist Church in 
1946 and has served for the 
last 12 years as the elected 
moderator of the Mt. Zion 
Association of Churches. 

On January 19, 1987, Guy 
Hunt was sworn in as the 



53rd Governor of the State of 
Alabama. By virtue of his of- 
fice, he serves as president of 
the Troy State University 
Board of Trustees. 

Wallace D. Malone 

Mr. Wallace D. Malone 
was born on August 3, 1936, 
in Dothan, Alabama. He at- 
tended Dothan High School. 
After graduation, he attend- 
ed the University of Alabama, 
where he received his Bach- 
elor of Science Degree. He 
later received his Masters in 
Business Administration 
from the University of Penn- 
sylvania. 

Mr. Malone is married- 



to Ocllo S. Malone. They 
have three children: Wallace 
Davis Malone III, Catherine 
D. Malone and Alyson Davis 
Malone. 

Mr. Malone presently re- 
sides in Birmingham, Ala- 
bama, where he is chairman 
and chief executive officer of 
the Southtrust Corporation, 
a 6.1 billion dollar bank hold- 
ing company. 

A member of the Alabama 
Academy of Honor, he is in- 
volved in many civic endeav- 
ors. Among these are direc- 
tor of Birmingham Chamber 
of Commerce, director of 
the Business Council of Ala- 
bama, trustee of the Eye 
(con't next page) 



Foundation Hospital, Inc ., di- 
rector of the Birmingham 
Boy Scouts Council, director 
of the American National 
Red Cross, trustee of the Bir- 
mingham Symphony Associ- 
ation, director of the Bir- 
mingham Alliance of Busi- 
ness, and many other 
organizations. Mr. Malone 
serves as pro tempore on the 
Board of Trustees. 

Ralph Wyatt Adams 

Since October 1, 1964, 
when Chancellor Adams was 
named President of Troy 
State College, he has guided 
a small school of barely 2,000 
students into a giant, multifa- 
ceted university system of 
over 13,000 students. 

On July 1, 1985, Dr. Adams 
was named Chancellor of 
Troy State University by the 
Board of Trustees. On May 
27, 1987, the Honorable 
Governor Guy Hunt present- 
ed Dr. Adams with Alabama's 
first Chancellor's medallion. 
Elected to the Alabama 
Academy of Honor in 1977, 
Chancellor Adams has made 
great accomplishments in his 
life but he still remains a sim- 
ple man who listens to his 
students, dreams for greater 
things for the University, and 
when he can find the time, 
enjoys a friendly game of 
dominoes. 

Chancellor Ralph Wyatt 
Adams is a native of Samson, 
Alabama. He attended high 
school at Lyman Ward in 
Camp Hill. After high school, 
he attended Birmingham- 
Sothern College and the 
University of Alabama Law 
School. There he met Doro- 
thy Kelly and they married in 
September of 1942. 

Chancellor and Mrs. Ad- 
ams have three children: 
Ralph Wyatt, Jr, Kelly Cle- 
ments Allen and Samuel. 

Through the years, Chan- 
cellor Adams has been an in- 
novator in the field of educa- 



tion. His university without 
walls concept has been emu- 
lated throughout the nation. 

John A. Teague 

Dr. John A. Teague was 
born on July 9, 1944. He re- 
ceived an honorary doctor- 
ate degree from the Alabama 
Institute for the Deaf and the 
Blind in Talledega, Alabama. 
Dr. Teague is married to 
the former Judy Duke of 
Goldwater, Alabama. They 
have four children: Kristi Bai- 
ley, who recieved a B.A. for 
Jacksonville State; Tracey 
Bailey, who received a B.A. 
from the University of Ala- 
bama; Allison Teague, who 
presently attends the Uni- 
versity of Alabama, and Todd 
Teague. 

He resides in Childers- 
burg, Alabama, where he is 
working in the field of public 
relations and serves as a lob- 
bysit. 

Dr. Teague has spent most 
of his life in public service to 
the people of Alabama, in- 
cluding serving as State Re- 
presentative from 1974 to 
1976, and State Senator form 
1976 to 1986. He was presi- 
dent pro-tem of the Senate 
from 1983 to 1986. He has re- 
ceived many awards for his 
exemplary service to the 
public, including "Who's 
Who in American Politics 
and Outstanding Legislator" 
in 1984 and 1985. 

In his free time, he enjoys 
being with his wife and chil- 
dren working on charitable 
projects. 

Robert E. Kelly 

Mr. Robert E. Kelly was 
born in 1929, in Evergreen, 
Alabama. He attended Ever- 
green High School until 
graduation in 1947. After 
graduation he attended the 
University of Alabama where 
he received his Bachelor of 
Arts Degree. He later re- 
ceived his law degree from 



(he University of Alabama in 
1956. I le is married to Betty 

Moles Kelly. I he\ h.ne three 
< I) i Id r en : B r end.i Kelly 
Knapp, I ee Ann Han.in, and 
Robert A. Kelly. 

He presently resides in 
Montgomery, Alabama, 
where he is an exec Jtive vice 
president for Union Bank 
and Trust Compnay. 

I le is a member ot Phi I l,i 
Sigma, Alpha Kappa Psi, Beta 
Alpha Psi, Pi Alpha Delta and 
Omicron Delta Kappa. 

C.J. Hartley 

Mr. C.J. Hartley was born 
on April 15, 1926. He was 
raised in Tuscaloosa, Ala- 
bama where he attended the 
University of Alabama. He 
received his degree in 1949. 

In the same year, he mar- 
ried Mary T. Hartley, who is a 
graduate of the University of 
Tennessee. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hartley have 
three children; Weston T. 
Hartley, a graduate of Shel- 
ton State, C. Jeff Hartley, a 
graduate of the University of 
Alabama, and Stuart A. Hart- 
ley, a graduate of the Univer- 
sity of Alabama. Mr. Hartley 
is a member of the South 
Highland Church, where he 
is a member of the financial 
strategy committee. He also 
serves on the Board of Direc- 
tors of AmSouth Bank, on the 
Industrial Development Au- 
thority Committee, is a 
member of of the Exchange 
club, and Shelton State 
Technical College Advisory 
Board. 

Mr. Hartley enjoys selling 
real estate and in his free 
time he relaxes by playing a 
round of golf at Indian Hills 
Country Club. 

R. Douglas Nankins 

Dr. R. Douglas Hawkins 
was born on April 15, 1935. 
He attended high school in 
his hometown of Luverne. 
Alabama. After graduation 



he attended Auburn Un 

sity where he I bis 

do< tor .it e in \ e t e r \ • 

MedK ine in i'>59. 

He is married to the formei 
R.k del n oungblood I hey 

have three < hildren Martha 
I vnn Drinkard, I lolly \nder - 
son, and Robert D Hawkins, 

Jr. 

He presently resides in 
Troy, Alabama, whre he is j 
pra< tu inn veterinarian. He is 
also active in the ( ommunity 
serving as vice chairman of 
the T.S.U. Foundation, a 
member of the T.S.U. Publi- 
cations Board, advisor to the 
Pi Kappa Phi fraternity, di- 
rector of the Pike Pioneer 
Museum, director of Troy 
Bank and Trust, and a deacon 
at the First Baptist Church. 

In 1986, the TSU Board of 
Trustees rewarded Dr. Haw- 
kins for his years of faithful 
service by naming the new 
press box, located in Memo- 
rial Stadium, in his honor. 

Harold R. Collins 

Dr. Harold R. Collins was 
born on March 14, 1919. He 
earned his bachelor's degree 
from Troy State College in 
1946, a master's degree from 
the University of Alabama in 
1953 and a doctoral degree 
in 1968. 

Dr. Collins is married to 
Ruth B. Collins. They have 
two children: H. Ray Collins, 
Jr. and Gene B. Collins. 

He presently resides in 
Mobile, Alabama, where he 
is a consultant in finance and 
education. 

He is involved in man\ c i\ - 
ic endea\ors including Ro- 
tary Club, Intensel, and Phi 
Delta Kappa. 

He has received the honor 
of being named Troy State 
University Alumnus of the 
Year and is listed in Who's 
Who in American Education. 
He received the "Outstand- 
ing Iducation" award from 
the Capstone Societ\ 



Board of Trustees 355 



^G&ict o^ *7*4C4tee4> 



Wayne Teague 

Dr. Wayne Teague was 
born on April 23, 1922. After 
graduating from high school, 
he attended the University of 
Alabama where he received 
an L.L.B. degree from the 
Alabama Law School in 1950. 

He is married to the former 
Ruth E. McDaniel and has 
four children: Sue Stough, 
Robert T. Wilson, Jr., Sally 
Dewitt, and Alice Wilson. He 
presently resides in Jasper, 
Alabama, where he is a prac- 
ticing attorney. In his spare 
time, he enjoys relaxing 
while watching a good match 
of tennis. 

He has served 12 years in 
the Alabama Senate. While 
there, he was chosen as Out- 
standing Orator for two 
terms and was named Out- 
standing member as well as 
Most Popular Member. 



Roy J. Gamble 

Mr. Roy J. Gamble was 
born on June 5, 1924. He 
graduated from Auburn Uni- 
versity in 1951, receiving a 
Bachelor's degree. 

He is married to Jane Gam- 
ble. They have five children: 
David, Steve, Julia, John and 
Barbara. 

His civic organizations in- 
clude the Society of Ameri- 
can Foresters, Alabama For- 
estry Association, Forest 
Farmers Association, Ameri- 
can Pulpwood Association, 
Alabama Cattlemens Associ- 
ation, Masons, and Shriners. 

Among his honors and 
special recognitions are his 
service on the interview 
committee to hire the Dean 



of Forestry at Auburn Uni- 
versity, service on the Board 
of Trustees of Forest Pro- 
ducts Workmens Compensa- 
tions Fund and appointment 
to Legislative Forestry Com- 
mittee. 

Mr. Gamble presently lives 
in Cullman, Alabama, where 
he is a timber supplier. 



Linda Martin Maynor 

Linda Martin Maynor was 
born on June 22, 1953. She 
graduated from DuPont High 
School in 1971. She later 
graduated from the Universi- 
ty of Maryland, European Di- 
vision in 1977, with a Bache- 
lor of Art in Psychology. She 
married Robert C. Manor, Jr. 
and they have two children: 
Audrey and Jeffrey. 

Her civic organizations in- 
clude: Madison County 
Medical Auxiliary Board of 
Directors, Crimestoppers 
Board of Directors, Constitu- 
tion Hall Park Board of Direc- 
tors, Harris Home Board of 
Directors, Huntsville Cham- 
ber of Commerce Board of 
Directors, National Chil- 
dren's Advocacy Group 
Board of Directors, Madison 
County Medical Auxilary, 
Huntsville Chamber of Com- 
merce, Crimestoppers, 
Hunstville Symphony Or- 
chestra Guild, Harris Home, 
Heart Association, American 
Cancer Society/Huntsville, 
Constitutional Hall Park, 
Randolph School, Alabama 
Film Commission, Hospice of 
Huntsville, Universtiy of Ala- 
bama/Huntsville, United 
Way/Hunt sville-Madi son 
County, Ducks Unlimited/ 
Huntsville, Huntsville Hos- 



pital Foundation and Out- 
standing Young Women in 
America. Her political in- 
volvements include: Vice 
President George Bush- 1988 
Presidential Campaign, Go- 
verner Guy Hunt, Senator 
Richard Shelby, Senator Don 
Riegle, Tommy Battle for 
Mayor Campaign, A.W. Bolt 
Supreme Court Campaign, 
Governor Hunt Transition 
Team and Charlie Graddick 
for Governor Campaign. 

She presently resides in 
Gurley, Alabama, where she 
is an administrator. 

Allen Earle Owen, III 

Allen Earle Owen, III was 
born on January 15, 1948. His 
educational experiences in- 
clude a Bachelor of Science 
in Business/Marketing, a 
Masters of Science in Per- 
sonnel Management and a 
Masters of Science in Coun- 
seling and Human Develop- 
ment, all from Troy State 
University. As well as Accre- 
didation for Personal Man- 
ager and Certified Employee 
Benefit Specialist. 

He married the former An- 
nette Colley. They have two 
children, Allen, IV, and 
Matthew Colley. 

His professional organiza- 
tions and experiences in- 
clude: American Society for 
Personnel Administration, 
East Alabama Personnel As- 
sociation, National Guard As- 
sociation of the United 
States, National Guard Asso- 
ciation of Alabama, Business 
Representative for U.S. De- 
partment of Labor, Uneme- 
ployment Insurance Quality 
Control Roundtable, Geor- 



gia Deparment of Labor, Ad- 
visory Council, Employers' 
Task Force on Unemploy- 
ment Compensation, Exper- 
ience Rating Committee, 
North Carolina Employment 
Security Commission, In- 
structor at West Point Pep- 
perell-Management and De- 
velopment Program, recipi- 
ent Quigley Award, "Out- 
standing Vocational Instruc- 
tor", Alabama Management 
Improvement Program and a 
registered lobbyist for Ala- 
bama and Georgia. 

Mr. Owen presently re- 
sides in Opelika, where he is 
the Director of Legislative 
Affairs for West Point Pep- 
perrell, Inc. 



Deborah j. McGill 



Deborah J. McGill was 
born on September 5, 1968. 
She attended Santa Fe High 
School. 

She was elected president 
of the Student Government 
Association inthe spring of 
1988. By virtue of her elected 
office, she is the voice of the 
students on the Board of 
Trustees. 

She majored in Politcal 
Science/History. While an 
undergraduate, she was ac- 
tive in organizations such as 
Student Government, Chi 
Omega Sorority, Tropolitan, 
Trojan Ambassadors, Presi- 
dent of the Alabama Presi- 
dent's Council, Gamma Beta 
Phi, Omicron Delta Kappa 
and Who's Who Among Col- 
lege Students. 



356 Board of Trustees 



Executive Committee 




Row One: Thomas Harrison; President of Dothan Campus, Dr. Ralph VV. Adams; Svstem Cham elloi and Dr I Ugene I Irod President ol 
Montgomery Campus. Row Two: Bill Hopper; Vice President for Financial Affairs, Dr. Edward Harnett Vice President fol V .ufemu 
Affairs, Joel Lee Williams; University Attorney, Dr. Donald Gibson; Vice President lor student Affairs and -\dmmistrati\e \ssistanl to the 
Chancellor, Mr. Bill Buchanon; Director of Public Relations, and Mrs. Gean Q. Mary; Executive Secretary 






Executive Committee 357 



ADMINISTRATION 




Mr. Donald J. Gibson 

Vice President for Student Affairs 

and Administrative Assistant 

to the Chancellor 











^_ 


JUJ I 










J^ 


















f 

1 ► *"" 


"*\ f 






\ 




\f) 





V. v 







Dr. Edward Barnett 

Vice President for Academic Affairs 



Mr. Bill Hopper 

Vice President for Financial Affairs 



358 Administration 




Mr. Fred Davis 

Assistant to the Vice President 
of Academic Affairs 



Mr. Robert Williford 

Dean of Student Affairs 




Mr. Jim Hutto 

Dean of Enrollment Services 



Mr. Thomas Souter 
Dean of l ibrary ServU es 



Administration 359 



Administration 




Bill Buchanon Dale Mosley 

Director of Public Relations Director of Communication 
and Information Services 




Hugh McCracken, Jr. 

Director of Alumni Affairs 



Walter K. Hennegan 

Dir. of Development 
and TSU Foundations 




Walter E. Sullivan 

Director of Academic 
Records 



Joyce C. Law 

Assistant Director 
of Academic Records 



Jodie Harrell 

Academic Records 
Administrative Assistant 



Jefferson C. Golden 

Director of Financial Aid 




Jimmy Holley 

Dir. of Center for 

Developmental Ed. and Dir. 

of Enviromental Research 



Angela C. Rolling 

Director of Title III Project 



Debbie Sellers 

Director of Student 
Support Services 



Mary Griffin 

Coordinator of Computer 
Works 



360 Administration 




William N. Conway 

Director of Graduate 

Admissions/ Jr. College 

Articulation 



Van English 

Assistant Dean of Enrollment 
Services 



Carolyn Gibson 

Director of Placement 
Services 



Sherrell Bees 

Director of University 

Counseling 




Carl Precise 

Assistant Director of 
Financial Aid 



Alan C. Boothe 

Chief of Campus Security 



James V. Bradsher 

Assistant Director of 
Financial Aid 



Charles Lee 

Director of Purchasing 

Inventor) Control and 

Textbook Centei 




f) 



x «»* 



f 




Alice Perrigin 

Title III Counselor 



Bob Sheppard 

Instructor/Coordinator 
Natural Sciences 



Elanor Lee 

Writing Center Instructor 
Title III 



Carol kimbrough 
Spe< ial vt\ ding 

Instructor Title III 



^l^mlnl•.tr.^tlon 361 




r 



Joan Word 

English Instructor and 

Coordinator of Writing 

Across the Curriculum 

Title III 



Laurianne Herndon 

Director of Women's 
Residence 





Ronald Pierce 

Director of Adams Center, 

Conference Services and 

Advisor to Student 

Organizations 



Dan Boswell 

Assistant Director of Adams 
University Center 



V 










Tom Ensey 

Sports Information Director 



Joe Johnson 

Director of Publications 



i. 



Herbert Reeves 

Director of Men's 
Residence 





Barbara Patterson 

Director of Housing 
and Greek Affairs 



AJ 



.♦ i 



\ 



Robert Stewart 

Athletic Director 



Don Jeffery 

Director of Natatorium 




v 



Susan Pierce 

University Counselor 



Sidney Starling Jr. 

Director of High School 

Relations and Pre-College 

Orientation 



362 Administration 




■ ■ 


1 

• 'A 


i jj 

1 


*^ , • 




t^-A 






Jimmie Clark 

Director of Data Processing 



Dale Law 

Chief Accountant 



Melton Carter 

Director of Physical Plant 



Dr. Emma Norris 
Director of Art hives 




Dr. Donald Barras 

Director of Pre-Med and 
Allied Health Services 



Dr. Dwight Cleveland 

Director of Department 
of Radio and Television 



Erma Blair 

Postmistress 



Linda Golden 

Assistant Postmistress 





Pat Reeves 


Teresa Rodgers 


Jim Jackson 


Donna Reynolds 


Bookstore 


Admissions Counselor 


Dire< tor of Promotions 


Assistant Dir« tor of 






for the Department 


I niversit) Relations 






of Athletu s 


^dmlnlslratlon 363 



WTSU-FM: Row One: Sherry 
Boutwell, John Brunson and John 
McVay. Row Two: Bruce Mims and 
Steve Holmes. 



WTSU-FM: Row One: James 
Clower Row Two: John McClung, 
Tal Eaton and Kyle Ridgway. 



Infirmary Staff: Row One: Becky 
Norsworthy, Andrea Garrett and 
Cwe Martin. Row Two: Karen Rich- 
ardson and Kathy Hendrix. 




364 Administration 



Administrative 
Staffs 




Library Staff: Row One: Carla Guth- 
rie and Frankie Muller Row Two: 
Lois Green and Ethel Sanders. Row 
Three: Betty Chancellor and Carol 
Van Enum Row Four: Nell Bassett 
and Julianne Dillard. Row Five: Hu- 
bert Conner and Thomas Souter: 
Dean of Library Services. 




Campus Securitv: Ir \ in Knd* 

lames Thompson Tommv Lismn- 

ston, Kern Brooks and \«.hlo\ John- 
son 



Administration 365 



College of Arts and Sciences 



The mission of the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sci- 
ences is the traditional 
one of providing a broad lib- 
eral education. This goal em- 
braces the cultivation of 
ideas and independent 
thinking, the stimulation of 
reasonable and critical 
judgement, and the broad- 
ening of past and contempo- 
rary knowledge. The desired 
result is to deepen one's ap- 
preciation of the achieve- 
ments of mankind, to devel- 
op fuller understanding and 
tolerance, and to encourage 
each individual student to- 
ward greater and more in- 



Dr. John Long 
Dean 

formed participation in the 
life of a free society. 

The College of Arts and 
Sciences is divided into eight 
departments: history and so- 
cial sciences, English, foreign 
languages, biology, math- 
ematics, physical science, 
criminal justice and aero- 
space studies. Chairing the 
abovedepartments are Dr. 
Curtis Porter, Dr. Rosemary 
Canfield-Reisman, Dr. Peter 
Howard, Dr. Robert Dietz, 
Mr. James O'Neal, Dr. Ed- 
ward Ward, Mr. Glynn Ei- 
land, and Major Cornelius 
Ryan. 





366 College of Arts and Sciences 




Department of English: Rem One: 
Dr. Gertrude Schroeder, Deborah 
Hicks, Beverly Gibson, Dr Rosemary 
Canfield- Reisman, Dr. Mars Ann 
Tighe and Phyllis Talmadge Row 
Two: Albert Glover, Charles 
Avinger, Dr. Emma Norris, Dr. 
Theron Montgomery, Dr. Jeff Cupp 
and Dr. Joshua Copeland Rom 
Three: Dr. James Day, Dr. Steve 
Cooper, James Davis, Michael Or- 
lofsky, Ed Hicks and Rhonda Ta- 
bron. 



Department of Math: Rov% One: 

)r. Jan Elrod and Diane Porter Row 
Two: James O'Neal, Dr Lou Destito 
and John Lee. 



College ot Krt$ and Sciences 



College of Arts and 
Sciences, Continued 



Department of Biological Sciences: 
Row One: Melba Adams, Danice 
Costes and Dr. Charles Lee. Row 
Two: Raymond Kisner, Teresa 
Moore, Kathy Grant and Dr. Donald 
Barras. 





□ 



• U f J §1 



Top Left: Department of Physical 
Sciences: Row One: Magdalena 
Wojciechowska, Dr. Edward Ward 
and Dr. Eugene Omasta. Row Two: 
Dr. Nicholas D'Andrea, Dr. B.J. Bate- 
man, Edward Kantor, Dr. Billy Nor- 
man and Dr. John Muller. 
Middle Right: Department of His- 
tory and Social Sciences: Row One: 
Dr. Earl Smith, Patrick Harris, Dr. 
Milton McPhercon, Dr. Norma 
Mitchell and Dr. Joseph Mitchell. 



Row Two: Dr. Charles Watson, Dr. 
Robert Pullen, Dr. William Welch, 
Robert Brown, Mr. Grady Post, Rob- 
in Silver and Curtis Porter. 
Bottom Left: Department of Aero- 
space Studies: Row One: Major 
Stephen Kranz, Lt. Colonel Christo- 
pher Ryan and Captain Stanley Raab. 
Row Two: Sgt. Frank Hayden, Cap- 
tain Mark Eaton and Sgt. Willis Walk- 
er II. 



368 College of Arts and Sciences 




Department of Foreign Languages: Professor of Spanish and Dr. Petei Department of Criminal Justice: Moore ind Dt ( baric-, lones 
lames L. Sherry, Instructor of Howard, Chairman and Associate Glenn lil.tnd, chairman Stanle) 
French, Cordelia L. Gray, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 



( ollegC of Arts and S< iem <-^ 369 



School 
of Education 



The School of Education is 
organized into four depart- 
ments: education, psycholo- 
gy, health and physical edu- 
cation (HPER), and human 
services. 

A regional In-Service Edu- 
cation Center, located in 
McCartha Hall, became a 
part of the School of Educa- 
tion in 1985. Its purpose is to 
provide in-service education 
for twenty-two school sys- 
tems in southeast Alabama. 

The current faculty is best 
prepared in the history of the 
School of Education. All 
nineteen faculty members in 
the Departments of Educa- 
tion and Psychology hold 
doctoral degrees from a total 
of fourteen universities 
throughout the United 
States. The Department of 
Health and Physical Educa- 
tion has added several faculty 
members with doctorates 
during the past three years. 

The Department of Educa- 
tion offers undergraduate 
and graduate programs in 
early childhood, elementary, 
special, and secondary/ N-12 
education. A non-traditional 
fifth-year program in educa- 
tion was implemented in 
September, 1985, for per- 
sons holding non-education 
baccalaureate degrees. 
Teacher education programs 
offered on the Troy campus 
are accredited by the Nation- 
al Council for Accreditation 
of Teacher Education, South- 
ern Association of Colleges 
and Schools, and the Ala- 
bama State Department of 
Education. 

The Department of Psy- 
chology offers an undergrad- 
uate major and minor in psy- 
chology and double majors 
in psychology and marketing 
and psychology and manage- 
ment. 

In addition to its teacher 



Dr. James D. Kimbrough, 
Dean 

education programs, the De- 
partment of Health and Phys- 
ical Education offers non- 
teaching degrees in health 
and physical education. The 
Department of Human Ser- 
vices offers undergraduate 
degrees in rehabilitation, hu- 
man services, and social 
work. National accredidation 
is being pursued for the so- 
cial work program. The De- 
partment of Human Services, 
through a contractual agree- 
ment with the Department 
of Youth Services, operates a 
Group Home for Girls in 
Troy. 





Inservice Education Center: Harriet 
Boatwright, Terry Quails, Janice 
Folks and Betsy Dismukes. 



370 School of Education 



Department of Psychology: Row 
One: Dr Pamela Manners, Dr. Sar- 

amma Mathevs and Mrs Cindy Daf- 
m Row Two: l)r lames Dvsser, Dr. 
Stanley Echols and Dr. Anna Smith; 
Chairman. 




School of Education 371 



Department of Education: Row 
One: Dr. Jane Hawk, Dr. Hazel Mar- 
iscano, Terry Quails, Harriet Bootw- 
right and Jane Smith. Row Two: Glo- 
ria Chapman, Helen Hutto, Dr. Patri- 
cia Hardin, Dr. Sirley Fischer, 
Barbara Hornsby and Betsy Dis- 
mukes. Row Three: Dean James 
Kimbrough, Dr. Darrell Pearson, Dr. 
Jack Dalton, Dr. Forrest Petry and 
Dr. Robert McCombs. 



Department of Human Services: 
Row One: Charlene Nelson, Charles 
Whitson and Joyce Sorrell. Row 
Two: Tony Walker, Ben Arellanoand 
Joseph Harrington. 



Department of Health and Physical 
Education: Row One: Lance Tatum, 
Beverly Filinggham and Cathy Flynn. 
Row Two: Bill Gausphol, Don Jef- 
frey, Dr. Anthony Adcock and Gene 
Hansen. 







372 School of Education 



Hall School of Journalism 




Mr. Merrill Bankester 
Dean 

This fall saw the largest 
number of incoming fresh- 
men in the history of the 
School of Journalism. Added 
to this three new fa< ult v 
members gives reason for a 
bright outlook. 

All three of these faculty 
members bring a strong pro- 
fessional background to the 
program. 

Arnelle Ad cock, who 
taught on a part-time basis 
List year, became a full-time 
instructor this fall. Mrs. Ad- 
cock had her own public re- 
lations business prior to join- 
ing the staff. Her primary 
teaching area is the public re- 
lations courses. 

Bob Fordan, who joined 
the faculty this past summer, 
had experience in the televi- 
sion and radio industry in ad- 
dition to teaching at the col- 
lege level. He is heading the 
broadcast sequence. 

Gordon McKerral, who is 
heading up the print journal- 
ism sequence, is getting his 
first taste of teaching on the 
college level. He has 10 years 




in the newspapei bus 

in< luding being .1 p.ir t <n\ ner 
of a newspaper in Indiana 

Soon to be put into oper- 
ation is .) radio lab whic h will 
allow students in the broad- 
cast program to train for the 

radio field. An on-campus 
television station provides 
these students the opportu- 
nity to sharpen their skills in 
an on-the-job type situation. 
For several years, broadcast 
journalism students haw 
been producing an evening 
news show on WTSU-TV 
very similar to that of area 
professional stations. With 
the opening of the radio lab, 
the school will become one 
of the best equipped broad- 
cast programs in the nation. 

The print program in- 
stalled a new type setting sys- 
tem with a laser print three 
years ago. All students in the 
program must learn to oper- 
ate the s\stem for classroom 
work. The system is also used 
by students to produce the 
campus newspaper. 

In order to provide stu- 
dents with more than a class- 
room look at the field of 
journalism, two student or- 
ganizations have been estab- 
lished on campus. The soci- 
ety of Professional Journalists 
is a nationwide umbrella or- 
ganization for both profes- 
sional journalists and stu- 
dents majoring in journalism. 
Alpha Epsilon Rho is a na- 
tional organization for stu- 
dents majoring in broadcast 
journalism. 



Hall School of journalism: [Van 
Merrill Baflkestei \nnettt 

Gordon Mikrrral and Bob Fordan 



Hall School of journalist- 



Sorrell 
College 

of Business 



Dr. Lawrence Lovick 
Acting Dean 




The programs offered by 
the Sorrell College of Busi- 
ness are designed to develop 
the skills and leadership qua- 
lities needed to succeed in 
the business community of 
the free enterprise system. 
Its major and minor degree 
offerings teach the technical 
competencies and attitudes 
of mind necessary to better 
understand and successfully 
cope with the rapidly chang- 
ing domestic and interna- 
tional world of business, in- 
dustry, and government. To 
facilitate these objectives, a 
faculty of highly qualified 
men and women bring to the 
classroom diversified aca- 
demic and business exper- 
ience backgrounds. 

The college now offers 
two tracks for the student to 
pursue. The first is in the 
business administration pro- 
gram, which includes majors 
in accounting, economics, fi- 
nance, general business, 
management, marketing, 
and office systems. These 
majors require the study of 
quantitative methods, man- 
agement information sys- 
tems, basic economics and 
accounting, business law, fi- 
nance, marketing, manage- 
ment, production, commu- 
nication and organizational 
and policy analysis. 




The second track encom- 
passes the study of computer 
and information science. The 
student pursues a course 
regimen of computer lan- 
guages, programming, and 
data base systems. The pro- 
gram emphasizes a "hands- 
on" approach with the utili- 
zation of personal comput- 
ers. In conjunction with 
computer studies, the stu- 
dent also pursues an aca- 
demic concentration in 
wither accounting or busi- 
ness administration or a ma- 
jor or double minor of his 
choosing. 



Dr. Edward T. Merkel 
Assistant Dean 

The College of Business 
also allows the student to 
pursue other avenues of 
study. The business educa- 
tion major can be obtained 
by those interested in teach- 
ing business courses on the 
high school level. An eco- 
nomics major can be ob- 
tained by the student prefer- 
ring a social science empha- 
sis. Minors in business 
administration, economics 
and computer information 
science are also available. 




374 Sorrell College of Business 



Department of Accounting Rum 

One: Robert P 

ell and Lee Danul Rov* Two: 
Shook, Dr. Thomas Ratclrffe, Chair- 
man, Eugene Sherman, J O. Ra> and 
Robert E. Stewart. 




Sonell College ol Business 175 



Sorrell College of Business 



W f '* ~*^^^^fl 


-44 




V ** ^fl 


TT 






rn 


EI |. 




i 

V 


1 «■ • 7 /fid 

I \ 




Department of Office Administra- Garrott. Row Two: Dr. Robert Center for Business and Economic Smythe, Janet Bradshaw, Joseph 
tion and Business Education: Row Wheatley; Chairman and Billy Wa- Services: Sandra Lucas, Susan Creek, Judy Callin and Patricia Davis. 
One: Helen Leverette and Priscilla ters. 




Department of Computer Science ley. Row Two: Dr. Bill Smith, Dr. Jer- Department of Marketing and Eco- Stewart; Chairman. Row Two: Dr. 

and Quantitative Methods: Row ry Hattaway and Lee Volet. nomics: Row One: Dr. Earl Ingram, R.M. Swisher, Larry lovik, Dr. E.T. 

One: Mary Smith and Cindy Cam- Chuck Thompson, Dr. Steve Gar- Merkel and Lee Volet. 

rott, Dr. Fred Cain and Dr. G. T. 



376 Sorrell College of Business 



School of Nursing 




i 



The School of Nursing of- 
fers three levels of educa- 
tional programs; the Associ- 
ate ol "■>< ience and the Mas- 
ter of Science, located on the 
Montgomery campus, and 
the Bachelor of Science, lo- 
cated on the Troy campus 
with upward mohility pro- 
grams in Dothan, Phenix 
City, and Montgomery. 

Nursing is a rapidly chang- 
ing field with many opportu- 
nities in health care for both 
men and women. Students in 
the School of Nursing have 
the advantages of a college 
education and professional 



c linu al experieru es in .1 vari- 
ety ot health tare settings. 
Facuh\ and staff are well 

qualified, and all programs 
are nationally a< < redited. 
Troy State I niversity School 
ot Nursing provides quality 

education for nurses who 
will contribute to improved 
health 1 are for indiv iduals 

and communities. The nurs- 
ing faculty and administra- 
tion encourage all individuals 
who are looking forward to a 
rewarding career with ex< el- 
lent employment opportuni- 
ties to consider nursing. 



Dr. Amanda Baker 
Dean 




Dr. Sandra Stevenson 

Assistant Dean 

Associate Degree Program 



Dr. Charlene Schwab 

Assistant Dean 

Master of Science and Nursing 



ot Nufv 




Brenda Riley 

Assistant Dean 

Bacculaureate Program 



Dr. Edith Kitchens 
Director of Research 
and Sorrell Professor 






» 



* 



UW 




378 School of Nursing 




BSN Staff: Row One 

ton, Connie \\el>l> Dr Doni 
sole Beck) >jrborough and Mice 
Deal Row Two: Dunn, Dr. 

Sandfd Witt, Shirley f land 
Petterson \im< Booth Betty Rus- 
sell, Sandra Faria Merrian Douglass, 
Susan Halley, leanette Hall and 
Brenda Riley; Assistanl Dean. 



Masters Program Facultt: Row One: 
Cathy Dearman, l)r \manda 

and Charlene Schwab Row Two: 
Dr. Debra Davis, Dr. Dandra Witt 
Dr. Edith kiti hens and Cath\ Dunn. 



ASN Staff: Row One: Mary 

c rawford B«t k\ Laq >ndie 

C .i r t «• r |an Kimball and ' 

Weavei Row Two: Joyce lenkins 
Dale Brown Lynn Norman Daph- 
nes Kennedy 
nita Hamilton Lillian Wise laft\ sm- 

i ohx c .i-.in(ir.i Henderson, Tina M- 
len Dt Mary Henderson Dr Sandra 
Stevenson and ludv c oo) 



School nt Ntirsil 



School of Fine Arts 



The School of Fine Arts at 
Troy State University is dedi- 
cated to the concept that ev- 
ery person needs the oppor- 
tunity to experience the arts 
and culture of our existence. 
It firmly believes this search 
for intellectual, emotional 
and aesthetic satisfaction can 
help develop objectives and 
meaning for life. 

Created in 1971, the 
School of Fine Arts encom- 
passes the disciplines of dra- 
ma, speech, and the visual 
arts. Through a curriculum 
which encourages perfor- 
mance, but recognizes the 
need for a thorough back- 
ground in history and theory, 
students can pursue an avo- 
cational experience or pre- 
pare for a career in the arts. 
These opportunities are 
guided to fruition through 



Dr. John Long 
Dean 



the dedicated efforts of fac- 
ulty artists concerned with 
the total educational exper- 
ience. 

A wide variety of cultural 
events are presented by the 
School throughout the aca- 
demic year. These include 
student and faculty exhibits 
in the visual arts, gridiron 
performances by the "Sound 
of the South" marching 
band, concerts by the Jazz 
band, Symphony band, Col- 
legiate Singers, and Madri- 
gals, operas and musicals 
performed by the Opera 
Workshop, student and fac- 
ulty recitals, intercollegiate 
debate competitions, chil- 
dren's theatre presented by 
the Pied Pipers and a broad 
spectrum of dramatic pro- 
ductions. 



Dr. David Eisler 
Assistant Dean 




380 School of Fine Arts 



Department of Music: Rem One: 
Mary Mims, ( .irol \1< ( 0) and Dr. 
Diana DeNicola Row Two: Sam Frc- 

(jru k, lames V\ ad< ■••• l< ^ Ralph Ford, 
!)r William Dennison, and I 
Smith 




Department of Arts and Classics: Pat Duke. Row Three: Edwin Walter, Department of Speech and Drama: 
Row One: Woody Ishmel. Row Dr. Robert Stampfli, Larry Shilabeer Dr. David Dye, Dr. Judith Lewis and 
Two: Dr. Earl Smith, Bill Lowery and and Mark Brewton. Tom Smiley. 



s t hool ot Fine Arts 381 



ty't&dct&te Sc£&a£ 



The first graduate degree earned 
at Troy State University was con- 
ferred in 1958. In 1958, the mission 
of the graduate program was to pre- 
pare students in Teacher Education 
and to meet the needs of the ele- 
mentary and secondary schools. The 
degree of Masters of Science Educa- 
tion was offered in several areas of 
professional education. 

Early in the 1970's, the need for 
knowledge and advanced education 
in specialized and professional fields 
required the University to add sev- 
eral new Master's programsin arts 
and sciences, business, counseling, 
and human development and crimi- 
nal justice. Several professional de- 
gree programs were added. In 1972, 
Educational Specialist Degrees were 
added in Counseling and Human 
Development and in Administration 
and Supervision for those students 
working the Master's level. In 1981, 
the Educational Specialist Degree 
was expanded to include early child- 
hood, elementary, and secondary 
education. The School of Nursing 
initiated its Master's Degree Pro- 
gram in 1982. 

Members os this year's 
graduate school committee 
include the following: Dr. 
Anthony Adcock, Dr. Debra 
Davis, Dr. William Denison, 
Dr. Rufus Hughes, Mr. Law- 
rence Mowery, Dr. Robert 
Pullen, Dr. Curtis Porter, Dr. 
Edward Merkel, Dr. G. T. 
Stewart, Dr. John White- 
house, Dr. Andrew Cox, Dr. 
Magdalend Wojciechowska, 
and student member Tina 
Lockett. 



Dr. Rudi Argenti 
Dean 

In order to meet the growing 
complexity and need of a diverse 
student body, the Graduate School 
currently offers fourteen Master's 
and five educational specialist de- 
grees. The Graduate School as the 
administrative unit is concerned 
with all aspects of graduate educa- 
tion. Its primary responsibilities are 
the maintenance and enhancement 
of graduate programs within the 
TSU System. The graduate program 
is administered by the dean in coo- 
peration with the undergraduate 
deans. Policies and regualtions 
which govern graduate studies are 
formulated by the Graduate Coun- 
cil. 





382 Graduate School 



College of Special Programs 





The College of Special 
Programs was organized Au- 
gust 1, 1981, to administer 
the off-campus programs. It 
is comprised of four direc- 
torates: Applied Sciences, 
Continuing Education, and 
Education Services. During 
the 1987-88 school year, the 
College of Special Programs 
has seen an increasing inter- 
est in noncredit courses. 
Eighteen new courses were 
offered for community ser- 
vice on the main campus. 
However, the largest task of 
the College is the administra- 
tion of the Off -Campus 
Branches of TSU at Phenix 
City; Et. Benning, and Moody 
Air Force Base, Georgia, and 
the Florida Region Incorpo- 



Dr. James D. Young 
Dean 



rated and the thirty U.S. mili- 
tary locations in Europe. 

In the Fall of 1987 there 
were approximately 5,000 
students enrolled in ovei 
7,000 courses with the Col- 
lege of Special Programs. 
These students are usualh 
older than the main campus 
students and most have full- 
time occupations, outside of 
school. Their classes are usu- 
ally held at night and other 
off-duty hours. The most 
common academic programs 
are Business Administration, 
Management, -\pplied Sci- 
en< e, International Rela- 
tions, Personal Management, 
Criminal Justice, Counseling 
and Human Development. 



Mrs. Barbara M. David 
Director 



College Ol Special Program*. 383 




The Troy State University 
European campus is com- 
posed of sixteen mini-cam- 
puses in four countries: two 
in Italy, three in Turkey, four 
in England and seven in West 
Germany. Since its concep- 
tion in August of 1974, the 
European Division with 14 
courses at eight US Air Force 
installations and an intitial 
enrollment of 221, has grown 
to 52 courses at 16 bases and 
an enrollment of 687; the ac- 
tual student body has grown 
from 177 to 430 students. 

Individuals with a Bache- 
lor's Degree from an accre- 
dited university are eligible 



for programs, which grant 
Masters of Science, Degrees 
in Management, Internation- 
al Relations and Counseling 
and Guidance. Enrolling in 
two courses per term can en- 
able the individual to have 
his degree in fourteen 
months, without having to 
write a thesis. This especially 
provides the serviceman 
with an opportunity to 
broaden his education and 
even earn his Master's while 
stationed in Europe. 



Dr. Robert H. Kelley 

Vice President 





Dr. Charles R. Connell III 

Director of Academic Affairs 



Phillip Wittenberg 

Director of Supportive Services 



384 TSU in Europe 




Janet V. Hughes 
Director of Admissions/ 
Registrar 




European Region Headquarters: 
Row One: Brian Perrone and Peter 
Peterson. Row Two:Phillip Witten- 
berg, Sandy McCune, Dena Knauer, 
Jan Hughes, Judy Hicks, Pam Baker, 



Tabitha Jones and Janer Grubish. 
Row Three:Paul Young, Buddy 
Kalmbach, Robert Kelley, Charles 
Connell, Karin Berger and Theresa 
Trotter. 



European Region Faculty: Row 
One: Winfield Hutton, BilK Thor- 
ton, Matt Campbell and David 
Keithly. Row Two: Dan Daws, Alan 
Bare, Ernest Correia, Picot Floyd, 
Warren Nation, Henry Shine, kim 
Fox, Margaret Moore, Dick Olufs, 
James Pace, Wanda Ross, )ohn Clin- 
german. Bruce Mason, Diane Duk ,\ 
and Elizabeth Trousdell Not Pic- 



tured: Dean Caldwell lerr*, ( antrell, 
Adrian Carello lean David Isle 

Dronberger, William Hazei Petet 
Hefron ( arolsue Holland, John 
Hughes, Edward laynes lerry lohn- 
son, Paul Kiefei Robin Montgom- 
ery Mark Mitonaths. Vihibald 
Patterson Han- P( |ohn K ggs 

and Robert \\ essel. 



Rl m Europe 385 



TSU in Cuba 



In 1988, Troy State Univer- 
sity responded to a HQ Navy 
request that we provide up- 
per division and graduate 
programsat Guantanamo Bay 
Cuba. "Gitmo" is a remote, 
hardship tour area for the 
Navy and Marine Corps. It is 
the only American enclave in 
a hostile, communist coun- 
try. Nearly 10,000 U.S. Mili- 
tary Civilian employees and 
their dependents are sur- 
rounded by Castro's Cuban 
military forces. They are a 
completely self-contained 
community manufacturing 
their own fresh water supply 
from the Gulf of Mexico, 
create their own electrical 
power, and supplied by sea 
and air from the U.S. The 
military felt it was extremely 
important to offer their iso- 
lated population a quality 
off-duty education program 
so they turned to Troy State 
University. We have been so 
successful that today the 
Navy is negotiating with TSU 
as the only source to offer all 
undergraduate and graduate 
programs. 




TOP: Pictured is the main gate of 

Cuba's central base. 

Bottom: Pictured is the central 



base in Cuba, which houses the TSU 
branch campus. 




l 



• 



386 TSU in Cuba 




Paula Johnson 
Field Advisor-Yongsan 




Wanda Studebaker 
Representative 



Pacific Region 




Joe Studebaker 
Director-Pacific Region 




Stephanie Smock 
Field Advisor-Yongsan 



1 1 le motto, " I he sun shall 

never set on the I |*OJ State 

Campus" was made true 
when the U.S. Military con- 
tra* ted with the university to 

offei graduate edui atin pro- 
grams for the next five years 
in Hawaii, Japan, Okinawa, 
jnd Korea. Today, with a staff 
of nearly ten, and a fat ult\ oi 
six, TSU is providing quality 
education program opportu- 
nities throughout the Pa< ifi< 
to tens of thousands of U.S. 
military, civilian employees, 
and their dependents. Today 
hundreds of students are at- 
tending this far flung oper- 
ation with hopes of fulfilling 
their goals of improving their 
military performance or en- 
tering the education profes- 
sion. The Pacific Region with 
emergence of Korea and la- 
pan should prove a fruitful 
area for future growth and 
Troy State is there. 



TSU — Eaker AFB 



Eaker Air Force Base is lo- 
cated in North Eastern Ar- 
kansas. It is a SAC Base with 
world-wide bomber and air 
refueling missions, that serve 
our national security inter- 
ests. The base itself has about 
5,000 military, civilian em- 
ployees, and their depen- 
dents. In September, 1988, 
Troy State University re- 
sponded to a request from 
Eaker Air Force Base in Blyth- 
eville, Arkansas to establish a 
graduate program. Today 
our twenty students are at- 
tending TSU's classes leading 
to a master of public adminis- 
tration degree. TSU is pro- 
viding intensive week-end 
format and evening course 
work to the installation's 
population. 

Mrs. Deborah Peoples, TSU coor- 
dinator, stands in front of the sign 
for the grand opening for Eaker AFB, 
Blvthville, Arkansas. 




TROY STATE UNIVERSITY 
GRAND OPENING 
AND REGISTRATION 
1 J I THRU 26 AUG 



t 



Pacifk Regional Eaka vr B 387 



Florida Region, Inc. 



Troy State University Sys- 
tem, Florida Region, Inc., is 
dedicated to meeting the 
needs of military and civilian 
personnel in Northwest Flor- 
ida. It had its great begin- 
nings in 1973 at Hurlburt 
Field and later included Eglin 
Air Force Base, both of which 
are near Fort Walton Beach, 
FL. Since then it has expand- 
ed its areas of operation to 
encompass NAS Pensacola, 
Cory Station, and NAS Whit- 
ing Field in the Pensacola, FL. 
area 

The Florida Region offers 
baccalaureate degrees in Ap- 



plied Sciences, Business Ad- 
ministration, Computer Sci- 
ence, Criminal Justice, Psy- 
chology, and Social Sciences. 

Masters of Science de- 
grees are being offered in 
Counseling and Human De- 
velopment, International Re- 
lations, Management and 
Public Relations. 

The curriculum and format 
of course scheduling provide 
for flexible adaptability to 
the military and civilian 
working and student's duty 
or work requirements with- 
out compromising academic 
quality. 




Dr. Joseph E. Zuro 

Director 




Ms. Kathy Gresko 

Asst. Director and Assistant 
Academic Dean 



Donald L. Jeffers 

Chairman, Dept. of 
Management 



Mr. Morelle E. Larouche 

Business Manager 




James C. Pike 

Chairman, Dept. of 
Computer Science 



Dr. John F. Whitehouse William J. Cullen 

Assoc. Academic Dean Chairman, Dept. of Business 






^% 







James W. Dingle 

Asst. Prof. Bus. Economics 




Jerone P. Johnson 

Asc. Prof. Counseling 



388 Florida Region, Inc. 



Kathy Young 

Supervisor of Grad. Records 



Carol Reinarts 

Dir. Academic Records 



Muriel O. Landrum 
Chairman, Depl ol I ng. and 

lit. 



Ginny Kemper 
•Nssisl.int tO Dire< 'or 




Jackie Sawyer 

Academic Advisor/Coord. 
Eglin 



James W. Roberts, Jr. 

Textbook Manager 



Patricia A. Cram Tuny Jennings 

Asst. Coordinator; Academic Director of Librar\ Vr\ices 
Advisor, Hurlburt 




Douglas W. Scott 

Chariman, Dept. of 
Criminal Justice 



Ralph R. Ruyle, Jr. 

Chairman, Dept. of 
Math/Physics 



Dr. Sarah Johnson 

Asst. Prof, of Counseling 
and Human Development 



June Cummings 
Academic \dvisor, Eglin 




-*C 



Linda Kennedy 

Acting Coordinator, Whiting 



Patricia Moniz 

Acting Coord. Pensacola; 
Veterans Certifying Office 



Shirley Barrow 
Academic Advisor; 
Pensacola, Whiting 



^* 



Dr. Harrv B. Keller 

Prof. Management 



Florida Region. Inc 389 



* \:w 




» —ii ' " 



390 Retirements 










RETIREMENTS 



Christie Summers is retiring, 
after being employed at TSU 
in Montgomery for the past 
13 years. She served as a De- 
partment Chairman and As- 
sociate Professor. 



Marjorie Kirkland retired 
after her service to TSU in 
Dothan for the last twenty- 
two years. She was a profes- 
sor in the Education depart- 
ment. 



Vivian Peeks, Departmental 
Secretary II for the School of 
Nursing in Montgomery is 
retiring after sixteen years of 
service to TSU. 



Mordecai Arnold retired, 
.ittcr having served .is the As- 
sistant Professor for the Jour- 
nalism department on the 
main campus for the List four 
years. 



Franklyn Adams retired .itter 
having taught biolog) tor the 

last fifteen \< 



James Miller, the Associate Virginia Watson has retired 
Professor for Phenix City after her dedicated servio 
Branch retired after eight twenty-one years to the De- 
years service to TSU. partment of Education. 



Thomas Peeks, the Vice 
President of Financial Affairs 
retired after eighteen years 
of employment with TSU. 



Robert Dietz, after thirt,- 
nine years of teaching biol- 
ogy, has retired from TSU. 



Walter Hurley has retired Margie Prescott has retired Monica Kolaya, Director of 
after twenty-seven years of from the position of Sales Admissions, TSU in Mont- 
service to TSU. He was the Clerk-Cashier after sixteen gomery, has retired after 
Assistant Director of the Y ears - eleven years of service. 
Physical Plant. 



Rhae Swisher Jr., has retired 
after his employment with 
TSU in the position of pro- 
fessor for the college of Busi- 
ness, after seventeen years. 



Glynn Eiland, after sixteen 
years of service to TSU as the 
Chairman and Assistant Pro- 
fessor to the Criminal Justice 
Department has retired. 



Frank Mitchell, retired from 
the position of professor of 
History and Social Science 
after eighteen years of ser- 
vice. 



Edward Ward, professor of 
physical science, retired after 
twenty-four years of ser\ k e 



Ezella Taylor has retired after 
sixteen years of employment 
as a Custodial Worker I for 
the Physical Plant. 



Pinkie Smith, Custodial 
Worker I for the Phssical 
Plant has retired after seven- 
teen years of service to TSU. 



Retirements 391 



TSU at 

Dothan/Ft. Rucker 



Troy State University at 
Dothan/Ft. Rucker traces its 
origin to the Troy State Nor- 
mal School. 

In the late 1950's, in re- 
sponse to the need o f the 
militay at Ft. Rucker, Troy 
State began offering courses 
at the post and in 1961, a resi- 
dent center was established 
at Ft. Rucker. In 1967 the 
branch on the military base 
was named Troy State Uni- 
versity at Fort Rucker. By the 
mid 1970's, TSU at Ft. Rucker 
had outgrown its facilities 
available at Ft. Rucker. 

Wallace State Community 



College in Dothan offered 
the use of its classrooms and 
in 1974 Troy State University 
began offering classes in 
Dothan. The campus at Do- 
than is located near the heart 
of the downtown area in an 
eight-story building, Hous- 
ton Hall. 

The campus in Fort Rucker 
finds itself lodged in class- 
room space, which is pro- 
vided by the military in sev- 
eral modern instructional 
buildings, administrative 
space and library space is 
provided through the Uni- 
versity. 




Dr. Thomas Harrison 

President 






I 



/ 



Mr. Nolan Williams 

Administrative Assist, 
to the President 



Dr. Jack R. Sublette 

Executive Vice Presient 

Vice Pres. of Student 

Affairs and Development 



Mr. Gene Murphree 

Vice President for 
Financial Affairs 



392 TSU at Dothan/Ft. Rucker 




Dr. Larry A. Brown 

Dean, College of 
Arts and Sciences 



Dr. J. Wyatt Grimmer 

Dean, Graduate School & 
V.P. for Academic Affairs 



Mr. Crawford Buchanon 

Dean, School of Business 



Mrs. Gaye Peacock 

Director, TSUD Fort Rucker 



Dr. Betty Kenn.cU 
Dean, School of 
Education and Psw I 




Dr. John Haymazen 

Director, TSUD Center for 

Applied Research 




Mr. Frank Walker 

Director, Library Services 



Dr. Sandra Faria 

Coordinator, BS in Nursing 
Outreach Program 



TSU Dothan Ft Ruik.-r 393 



TSU in Montgomery 



In 1955 at the invitation of 
the U.S. Army, Troy State 
University established an ex- 
tension center at Fort 
Rucker. Ten years later the 
Air Force invited Troy State 
to establish a similar program 
at Maxwell Air Force Base. 
Troy State has been offering 
programs to Montgomerians 
since 1957 and to military 
personnel since 1965. 

In Montgomery, Troy 
State offers the following de- 
gree granting programs: As- 
sociates, Bachelors, Masters 
and Education Specialist. 
Eighteen undergraduate 
programs are offered as well 



as a variety of graduate pro- 
grams with majors in criminal 
justice, counseling, comput- 
er science, personnel man- 
agement and business ad- 
ministration. Several tele- 
courses— education via 
home television — are of- 
fered each quarter. 

From its small beginning 
the student body has grown 
to over 2700 students. In 
1983, Troy State University in 
Montgomery was indepen- 
dently accredited by the 
Commissions of Colleges of 
the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools. 



Or. Millard E. Elrod 

Director 





394 TSU in Montgomery 




Dr. Kline Johnson 

Vice President of 
Student Affairs 



Helen R. Bern 

Vice President of 
University Relations 



Dr. Fred Stewart 

Vice President of 
Academic Affairs 




Donald H. Threlkeld 

Vice President of 

Institutional Planning and 

Research 



Dr. Martha Lewis Johnson 

Vice President of 
Academic Affiars 



Walter E. Edmond 

Vice President of 
Financial Affairs 



Tsi in Montgomei 




396 Closing 




Closing 



The impressions of a year cannot be summed up in any equation, statement or 
even in this book. It is the accumulation of each individual's personal thoughts, 
feelings and visions. Every person forms a lasting impression of himself and the 
world around him. To be naive enough to belive that this book contains everyone's 
interpetation of his experiences during college would be ludicrous. However, it is 
our intent and desire to have at least captured some of the lasting impressions that 
have made your college experience memorable. 




Derek Brown 
Heath DeRamus 
Cara English 
Tim Jacobs 
Ed Moseley 
Donald Norsworthy 
Photographers 



Garr\ Cannon 
Set lion Editor 



Lori Featheringill 

Vince Stansbur\ 
Contributing Editors 



rig 397 



Everything 

for the Builder 

and 

"Do It 

Your 

Selfer" 



mmm 




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and 
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INSULATION * LADDERS * LUMBER * LAWN & GARDEN DEPT * LIGHTING 



FIXTURES * LOCKS * PAINT * PANELING * PLYWOOD * ROOFING * TOOLS * 



PUMPS * CHAIN SAWS * WINDOWS * WALLPAPER & PLUMBING SUPPLIES 



"HELPING BUILD A BETTER WAY OF LIFE" 



HENDRICKS 

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for appointment, call 

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Ads 399 



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flowers. Gifts £ Collectibles 

flowers for all occasions 

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"W£ DSjCJVSK" 

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Ads 401 



A 

Adams Center Union 

Board 213 

Air Force ROTC..208, 209 

Alpha Delta Pi 250, 251 

Alpha Epsilon Delta.... 186 

Alpha Gamma Delta.. 252, 

253 

Alpha Kappa Alpha ... 254, 

255 

Alpha Lambda Delta.. 174, 

175 

Alpha Phi Sigma 176 

Alpha Psi Omega 200 

Angel Flight 211 

Arnold Air Society 210 

Art Guild 189 

ACEI 194 



B 

Band... 226, 227, 228, 229, 

230, 231 

Baptist Student Union 202, 

203 

Beta Beta Beta 173 

Beta Upsilon Sigma 177 

c 

Chi Omega 256, 257 

Christian Student 

Union 204, 

205 

College Republicans... 217 

Collegiate Singers 224 



D 

DPMA 195 

Delta Chi 258, 259 

Delta Sigma Pi 195 

Delta Sigma Theta.260, 261 



Forensics 201 

G 

Gamma Beta Phi 172 

H 

HPER 197 



I 



ISCO 184, 185 



K 



Kappa Alpha Psi.. 262, 263 

Kappa Delta 264, 265 

Kappa Delta Pi 180 

Kappa Kappa Psi. 178, 179 



Lambda Alpha Epsilon 194 
Lambda Chi Alpha 266, 267 



M 



Madrigals Singers 225 

Men's Residence 166, 167 
Mortar Board 170, 171 



o 

Omicron Delta Kappa 177 



P 

Phi Alpha Theta 182 

Phi Beta Lambda 196 

Phi Eta Sigma 176 



Phi Kappa Phi 181 

Phi Mu 268, 269 

Phi Mu Alpha 220, 221 

Pied Pipers 201 

Pi Kappa Phi 270, 271 

Psi Chi 199 



s 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon.. 272, 

273 

Sigma Alpha lota. 222, 223 

Sigma Alpha Sigma 188 

Sigma Chi 274, 275 

Sigma Pi 276, 277 

Sigma Tau Delta 187 

SNEA 187 

Social Work Konnec- 

tion 198 

Society of Professional 

Journalists 190 

Square Root of C Math 

Club 191 

Student Government 
Association .162, 162, 163, 
164, 165 
Student Nurses 
Association 192, 193 



T 

Tau Beta Sigma 219 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 278,279 
Trojan Ambassadors ... 216 

kTrojan Hostesses 212 

Tropolitan 214, 215 



u 



University Honors 

Alliance 183 

University Dancers .... 214, 
215 



W 



Wesley Foundation.... 206, 

207 

Women's Residence.. 168, 

169 



402 Index 



A 



B 



ABBOII KIIIY HO. 240. 252 

Abercromble, Alan 247 274 

ABIRCROMBIE. ALLISON 122, 256 

Abercromble, ( il 1S5. 247, 274 

ABIRCROMBII WILLIAM 80. 98, 112 

ADAIR, CHERYL 80 

ADAMS. AMY 122 

ADAMS. CHRIS 24 1 

ADAMS, CHRISTI 80 

ADAMS, CHRISTOPHER 80 

ADAMS, DAUNE 245 

ADAMS, ELIZABETH 122 

ADAMS, JAMES 122 

ADAMS. JASON 80 

ADAMS. JON 122 

ADAMS, MICHAEL 80 

ADAMS, PATRICIA 98 

ADAMS. RACHEL 122 

ADAMS, ROBERT 98. 246 

ADAMS, ROVVENA 112 

ADAMS STEPHANIE 80 

ADAMS. SUZANNE 112 218. 245, 268, 277 

ADAMS, TAMMY 112 

ADAMS, WARD 80 

ADAMS, WILLIAM 40, 80, 242, 253, 258 

ADV ANI. CAUTAM 98, 175, 191 

Agboatsvala. Sohail 172, 185 

ACEE, LISA 122 

ACEE, LOUIS 112 

AIKEN, FRANKLIN 112, 195, 202 

ALAND, BEVERLY 112. 214 215 

ALBURY, JACE 122. 163, 247 

ALDRICH, JERRY 112 

Alessandroni. Mark 40, 122, 247. 274, 275, 333 

ALEXANDER, BARRY 98, 340, 342 

ALEXANDER, DEAN 112, 178, 228 

ALEXANDER, FELICIA 98 
ALEXANDER, JEFFREY 98, 228, 266 
ALFORD, IESSE 122 
ALICEA, ALBERT 112 
ALLEN, BRIDCETT 98 

Ml IV DONALD 80, 228 
ALLEN, JEFFREY 98 
ALLEN, KATRINA 98 
ALLEN, MICHAEL 80 
ALLEN, PAT 112, 248, 276 
ALLEN, WILLIAM 80 
ALLISON, EDWARD 98 
ALLMAN, PATRICIA 80 
ALLOWAY, VALERI 80 
ALLRED, NATOSHA 98, 245, 268 
ALLSUP, CHARLES 80 
ALSUP, KEVIN 112, 244, 266 

■WHS, DIANE 122, 172 
AMISON, SONYA 112, 241 

AMOS, CLIFFORD 122 

ANDERSON, DONNA 112 

ANDERSON, ERIC 112 

ANDERSON. GARY 112 

ANDERSON, JASON 112. 224. 229 

ANDERSON, JULIE 112 

ANDERSON. MONICA 240, 252, 274, 275 

ANDERSON. SHARHONDA 112 

ANDERSON, TAMMY 112 

ANDERSON, TRINA 112, 224, 229 

ANDREWS, BARRY 122 

ANDREWS, CELESTE 112 

ANDREWS, CEMIRA 80, 240 

ANCLIN, JOHN 122 

ANTHONY, CHARLES 136 

ANTHONY, CHERYL 122 

ANUSZEWSKI, ALIS 98, 219. 228 

APLIN, DEBORAH 112 

Aplin, Debra 188. 206, 207 

APUN, DONALD 122, 228 

APPLEY, MITCHELL 136 

ARCHIE, CHARLES 122 

ARD, PAMELA 98, 240, 250 

ARD, STACEY 98 

ARD, TRACEY 98, 240, 250 

ARMER SHANNON 80, 243 

ARMSTRONG, RAY 80 

ARMSTRONG. ROBERT 80 

ARMSTRONG. SHAYNE 98 

ARMSTRONG. TANYA 80 

ARMSTRONG. WILBURN 112 

ARRINGTON. TAYNA 80 

ASGEDOM, PEDROS 80 

ASHBY, MARSHALL 122 

ASHMORE. WINFORD 122 

ASHTON, WILLIAM 136 

ASKEW, ELIZABETH 98 

ASMUSSEN, TINA 122, 192 

ATCHISON, ROBERT 80 

ATCHISON, TRACI 80, 202. 203 

ATES. AMANDA 98 

ATES, SCOTTIE 112. 317 

ATKINS. ALISON 98 

ATKINS, SYLYVESTER 98 

ATKINS, TIMOTHY 112 

ATKINS. TONY 122, 246, 272 

ATKINSON. IENNIEER 98, 168 

ATKINSON, THOMAS 112 

AUBREY, LYNNE 122 

AULTMAN, MARY 112,252 

AUSBORN, JEFFREY 98, 229 

AUSTIN. ANTHONY 80 

AUSTIN, IRIS 80, 165 

AVANT, CHRIS 80 

AVERETT, STEPHANIE 122 

AVERY. DIANA 122 

AVERY, WENDY 80. 241, 256 

AYCOCK, THOMAS 80 



BAAS IROY 98 

BABH MAK ()l M 98 

BA( KINslo PAIKICIA 98, 240 

11 VI H.I I 1 MlllssA 80 

H\(,(,IH IIRRY 60 

BAGLEi BETTINA 80, 240 

BACLIY. GINA 80 

BAGLEI iim 246 

H Ml I Y UK ANTON 80 

B AIIIY C (IRIS 122 

BMll Y PATRICK 98 

BAILY. JENNIFER 98 

Bakei Ben in 

BAKIR KEYIRIY 98 

BAKER, DEBBIE 112, 192 

BAKER, GREG 80 

BAKER JEANNE 136 

BAKER. JOY 122, 194 

BAKER KEITH 122 

BAKER KIMBERLY 80, 240, 252, 277 

BAKER MAT ALU 98 

BAKIR RANDAI 112 

BAKER RIBECCA 122, 202, 224, 225 

BAKER RK HARD 122, 224 

BAKIR RUSSELL 98 

BAKIR IKA( I 122, 240, 250 

BAIDl ( ( I IWIllI 122 

BALDWIN IAWIN 80 

BALDWIN, RUSSELL 80, 191 

BALLARD. RANDALL 80 

BALLARD, RAY 98, 330 

BALLARD WINDY 98 

BALMER ( HRIMINE 80 

BANKS, WILLIE 98 195 

BANKSTON IIM II 98, 219, 228 

BANKMON MORRIS 122 

BARB IAN 122 

BARBER, DEBORAH 112. 168, 192, 212 

BARBER, TAMMY 80 

BARBOSA. VICTOR 112 

BARFIELD, AMANDA 80, 240, 250 

BARKETT, MARY 98 

BARNER, ROBERT 136 

BARNES, MATTHEW 98 

BARNES RANDALL 98, 298 

BARNES ROBERT 98 244 

BARNES, TIM 98 

BARNI Tit EVERETT 122 

BARR CHERYL 80 

BARR, DAVID 80 

Barr, Randall 33 

BARRETT, JEFERtY 112. 117 

BARRINGTON. JEROME 248, 276 

BARRON, GWENDOLYN 98 

BARRON IEEEREY 80 

Barrow. Dean 178. 229 

BARROW, JAMES 122 

BARROW, PATRICIA 80. 172 

BARTON CHRISTINE 122 

BARTON KENNETH 122 

BARTON, SHARON 122 

Barton, Shona 219. 229 

BASS, BARBARA 80, 250 

BASS, VALERIE 98. 228 

BATES, RICHARD 112, 242. 258 

BATIE, FATIMA 98 

Ballin, Leslie 191, 240, 250 

BATTISSTELLI. FRANK 112,208.210 

BAXLEY, DARREN 80 

BAXIIY IINNIHR 112 

BAXLEY, SHEILA 80 

BAXTER, DEANA 98. 214, 215 

Bean. Angela D 172 

Bean, Kris 256, 271. 270. 283 

Beard. Danny 272, 317 

BEARD. IE ANNE 98 

BEASIEV MARY 122 

BE ATY. CHRISTOPHER 80 

BE AVERS DAN 80 

BK K IENNIEER 136 

Bilk RONAID 122 111 246.256,272 

BECK MAN TONI 98, 202 

BEDSOLE. DANNY 122 

BIIRMAN MICHIllE 98 

BH( HER. BOBBY 247 

Bll( HER IVsON 80 

Bell, Annemane 40. 122 164 140 274 

Bill DAVID 122 

BELL, DEBORAH 122, 194 202. 211 

Bill DOl 1,1 As 112 1'8 228 

BELL. JOHN 112, 204 

BELL II DY 112 245 274 275 330 

BILL ROBBIE 98 

BELL ROLAND 80 

BtMHABBAT DANIEL 80.245.270 

BENDER JANET 112 

BENIIIILD I Al RA 122 

BENN ERIC 112 .'43. 263 

BFNNFTT BARBARA 80 172 

Bennett Em 21" 

BENNETT 1RICK 98 

BENNETT IRENE 122 

Bennett, lason 272 

BENNI 11 I ARTON 98 254 

BINNETT I ES| || |22 202 till 184 

BENNETT TRACY 80 2v 

BINNETT WILLIAM 98 

BINTKOWSKI GINA 112 165 245 268 

BERGLOFF ROBERT 80 

BERRY CHARLES 98 

BERRY KOTTNIE 80 

BEsTE CAR A 122. 245 

BET/CUD PETER 112 

BEVERLY IEFFEREY 81 




It's got to be Friday, with all of these happy faces. 



BHALLY IMRAN 122 

BIBB. SHANETTA 81 

BK E DONNA HI 241 256, 273 

BIEGLER MATTHEW 

BIRKS JENNIFFR 122, 183. 191, 224, 229 

BIRKs LAURIE 81 

BIRMINGHAM WINDY 122 

BIsHOP AMY HI 

BLACK, AMY 81 

BLACK C AROIYN 112 

BLACK, GREGORY 98, 315. 317, 318 

BLACK, MIKE 122, 272 

BLACK, RALPH 81, 242 

BLACK, SUSAN 81. 229 

Bl AC K Wit II AM B1 

HI AC KMON BRY AN 

BLACKMON Itl/ABETH 112,172,274.275 

BLACKMON CIENDA 122 

BUkwell. Gars 285 

BL AIR DEBRA 112, 241, 256 

BLAIR DON v 

BI MR II VINE 136 189 

Bl AKlllY ANGELA 98, 202, 17! 

Bl AlOC K DAN 122. 182 

BLALOCK, |IM 81 

Bl AND LARRY 122 

Blanton ( Ind) 194 

BLASCHK A AsTKID 98 

Bl A/IK. TODD 98 

BIEDSOI THOMAS 81 

BLEDSOE Will I AM 81 246 

BUY INs IOSIPH 123 

BIO< MR. LORIE 98 

BlO< KIR RANDY i 

BLOODWOR1H SHARON 112 243 264 

BIOW DARYl 121 

BLUE, Kill I 112 194 243, 273 

BOATNIR PHIIIIP 112 117 

BOATNIR 1RA( Y 98 

BODIFORD DAVID 123 

BODIIORl) MARK 81 

BODIIORD SMIRRY 12 I 

BOCAN ( YN1IIIA 

BOGGS (HARlls 123 -'42 258 

HOI, IN sONIA 81 

BOHANNON \MY Bl 

BOI VNOS Ml I is A 123 

BOHR Ml RRAY 98 

BOI Is III I R| Y 11 

BONC I I.IIBIRIO 112 173 

BONNIR IKIDRK K 98 24- 

BOOKIR RIBIl I A 98 

BOOTH RICINA 112 180 

BOOTH RK HARD 81 

BOSHIH AlVIN 112 

BOSHIH ( HIRII : 

BOslK K TODD 123 

BOSWIII KIMBIRIY 81 

BOTTs TIRRI 99 

BOI ( HI T NOIIM 

BOI INI, ION MIT( Hilt 

BOI TWILL UK IA 112 180 18' 24 

boi mm i isa i; 

BOI 1WIII RK HARD 11 

BOWDOIN l.ARY 112 

BOWDOIN s^M^ II 123 247 

BOW IN BOBBII 9 

Bowen Buil 272 

BOW IN ( AROl II 

BOWIN KIIIS 81 

ROWIN KRIslll 81 U*. 146 14" 

BOWIN TIMOTHY 81 

BOWIN VKKII 81 

BOWIN WINDY I 

BOWINS YVONN 

BOWIRMAN MARY BI1H 81 

BOWIRs [1ANIEL 99 

BOW is RIBI 



BOWMAN IIRRY 99 

BOYD IIEIERY 99 
BOYD 

BOYI TT IAMES 81 
BOYI U KONNII 123, 246 
BOYKIN s 

BO/IMAN DENISE 99 
BO/tMAN sTIPHI N 
BRA( KIN I HAD 81 
N It DY 112 
BR AC KIN LAWINDA 81 
BR ADEN BRIAN 113 
BRADEORD IONATHAN 121 
BRADIIY -ARAH llj 
Bradles. Tina 258. 259 
HRADSHAW |ANA81 24 1 264 330 
BRADY ItNNIEIR 
BR AN AN PINNY 99. 164. 16- 
BK ANC H lll/ABITH 113 
BK VNl H, III 

BRANNIN lll/ABITH 8V 1-4 175 240.252 
BRANNON KIM 1. 
BRANTIIY ANDREW 81 

BRANIIIY JOANNA 123 ■-. .4' .64,330 
BRANllEY VIVIAN 
BRASWIII IIANNII 123 121 •.. 
BRAY BONN 
BR A/Ill HI ATHIR 81 
BKK K KINNY 123 195 
BRINNAN |OHN 123 .45 328 
BRIWIR ( HIRYl ■ 
BRIVMR MARY IMILY 81 240, 250 
BRIWER Mil AH 81 
BRIWsllR Kill 
BRK I WILLIAM 81 117 318 
BRIslIN RK HARD H1 242 258 
BRITTON DAVI •• 
BRCX • 

■ • I 166 

BROOKS , HKISTINA 81 

BROOK- • '30 

BROOK- F( 19* 

BKOOK- IOMN 

BKOOK- KtKK» 

BROOK- \ 

BROOKS s\NDR V 123 211 

BKOOK- TKiY 81 

BROM ANDRIW 81 

RROnNAHAM HENRY SI 

BROI SSARD II AN 113 

BKOWN v. 

BROWN BIHNDA 81 

HKOWN 1 HARLIt 81 

BROWN ( HRtslorniR 123 189 

BKOWN DEI 

BROWN DON AID 81 

BROWN DONNA 113 

BKOWN '!'■• 

BROW 1 . 

BKOWN K • 

BKOWN Mis 

.'A MYR A 123 
. 
BROWN RIBEl i s 
BKOWN -TH 
BKOWN M -AN 81 
BKOWN 1 AIRI1 A 
BROW 

BKOWN THYl ANH 
HKOV- 

BKl 1 E ROBERT 
BRl N- H|N. 
BKl Nson s 
BRL nson JAME5 
BRl N-ON MH HAH 81 



H(U SM)\ MMM\ 81.219.228 

BRY AM Al A\ 113, -Mb 270 

HK1 AM. IIAUI) 81, 244. 266 

Brwint Cn-n 195 

BRY AM (.KH.ORY 123 

BRYAM IA\I(I 113 

BR1 AM. MARLNDA 99 

BKY AM. MARY BITH 81 

BRYAM PINNY 113 

BlIHlfR BRUCE 123. 247, 274 

Bl IHIIR GINA 113 

BUFF, SCOTT 123. 164. 182, 247 

BUICE. LINNA IO 81. 224. 229 

BUIS, PAULINE 113 

BULLARD, GEORGE 123, 328 

BULLARD. RICKY 81 

BULLOCK. DOUGLAS 123 

BULLOCK. HAROLD 81 

BULLOCK, WILLIAM 81 

BUOL, BONNIE 99, 172, 175. 204 

BURCH, NICOLE 99 

BURGESS, ANDRE 81, 178, 228 

BURKE. ALEC1A 99, 240, 252, 274, 275 

BURKES, JAYMIE 81, 195, 206, 207, 240 

BURKETT, |ANA 123, 172, 187 

BURKHALTER. APRIL 113 

BLRKHALTER, SHELLIE 82. 174, 241. 256 

BURKS. ROSEMARY 123 

BURMAN. BRIDGET 123 

BURNETT, BRANDY 82 

BURNETT, PATRICIA 82 

BURNETT. SYLVIA 99 

Burns, Brad 249, 270 

BURRELL. WARREN 123 

BURTON, GINGER 99, 243. 264 

BUSH, BEVERLY 82 

BUSH, JACQUELINE 113, 195, 240, 252 

BUSH, |ODI 82 

BUSH, JONATHAN 113 

BUSH, JULENE 99, 245, 268, 330 

BUSH, MICHAEL 123 

BUSH, PHILIP 123 

BUTLER, KIPP 99, 229, 241, 256 

BUTTS, FELISHA 82 

BYNUM, DANYA 99 

BYRD, ADAM 99 

BYRD, ALPONSA 99 

BYRD, DONNA 99 

BYRD, KECIA 82 

BYRD, SHEILA 123 



c 



CADDELL, ELIZABETH 82 

CADY, MARK 99 

CAGLE. CHRISTOPHER 82 

CAIN, BRIAN 113, 191, 274 

CAIN, ERIC 113 

CALDWELL, BONITA 99 

CALDWELL, CRYSTAL 123 

Calhoun, Jerry 258 

CALLANS, ANGELA 99, 308, 309 

CALLANS, BILLY 113, 195 

CAMPBELL, CAMELLA 82, 229 

CAMPBELL, JAMES 113, 202, 224 

Campbell, Tammy 113, 172, 254 

CAMPBELL, WINSTON 99 

CANEER, JULIE 82 

CANNON, GARRY 123, 164, 247, 274, 415 

CANNON, JEFFERY 99 

Cannon, John 228 

CANNON, MICHAEL 113, 172 

CANTY, DONNELLA 99 

CAPPS, AMANDA 99 

CAPPS, HENRY 113, 242, 258 

CAPPS, JON 113, 194 

CAPPS, KELLI 82, 241, 256 

CAPPS, MELANIE 113 

CAPRARA, BRADLEY 123, 228 

CAPSTRAW, JASON 82, 174, 244, 266 

CARAWAY, DEBORAH 82 

CARLISLE, CARLA 99 

CARMACK, DEANNA 113 

CARNEGIA, PAMELA 113, 168 

CARPENTER, LISA 82, 165, 240, 252 

CARPENTER, SCOTT 113, 244 

CARPENTER, STEVEN 113 

CARPER, LAURA 99, 229 

CARRIER, JENNIFER 113 

CARROLL, CHRISTOPHER 82 

CARROLL, DAVID 99 

CARROLL, KEVIN 113, 244 

CARROLL, LINDA 136 

CARTER, BRENDA 123 

CARTER. DEBORAH 123, 180, 194 

CARTER, DERRICK 113 

CARTER, GARY 113, 191, 195 

CARTER, KEITH 123 

CARTER, KEVIN 82, 228 

CARTER, LATANYA 123 

CARTER, MARTIN 99, 166, 228 

CARTER, ROBERT 123, 333 

CARTE*. THERESA 123 

CARTER, TOBI 82 

CASEY, STEVEN 99 

CASH, UNTAK 113 

CASKEY, MERREN 123 

CASON, RICKY 99 

CASSADY, JERILYN 123. 240, 252 

CASSADY, MECHELE 136 

CASSELLS, TAMMY 99 

CASTILLO, THOMAS 99 

CASTLE, CHARLES 99 

CASTLEBERRY, TERRY 99 

CATE, TAMARA 99 

CATRETT, PAYTON 123, 245 

CATRETT, THOMAS 123 

Cavanagh, Mike 270 

CAVER, PAMELA 99, 300, 301, 302 

CAYLOR, JIMMY 123 

CEASE, DIANE 113, 211, 229 

CELKA, CHRISTOPHER 113 

CELKA, MICHAEL 82, 174 

CERVERA, RICK 99 

CHAMBERS, LOREN 123 

CHAMPION, BRADLEY 113. 342, 343 

CHANCE, JASON 82 

CHANCE, WALTER 123 

CHANCEY, DEANNA 82 



CHANDLER. CHERYL 113. 204 

CHAPMAN, JOHN 99, 272 

Chapman, Kent 274 

CHAPMAN, LAMAR 99 

CHAPMAN, SIDNEY 123, 246 

CHAPPELl, ANITA 124 

CHAPPELL, JAMES 124 

CHASTAIN, HEIDI 243, 264 

CHASTAIN, JERRY 82 

CHEELY, ANDREW 113 

CHESTEEN, LARRY 99 

CHESTNUT, CASSANDRA 113, 224, 225, 229 

CHILDREE, JEN 245 

CHILDREE, JENNIFER 123, 218, 245 

CHILDS, GREG 246, 270 

CHILDS, KATHERINE 123 

CHINAKWE, CHARLES 136 

CHISM, RONDA 241, 256, 257 

CHRISTENSEN, RAEANN 124,245 

CHRISTOPHER, PAIGE 82, 245, 273 

CHUNN, MARY 99, 172 

CHUNN, NELLIE 82, 174 

CIAMBOR, JAMES 82 

Ciambor, Joseph 228 

CLARK, AMY 99 

CLARK, BRYAN 124 

CLARK, CHRISTY 82, 99, 206, 207, 224, 229 

CLARK, CRAIG 82 

CLARK, DAVID 99, 246, 272 

CLARK, DAWN 124 

CLARK, HENRY 124, 242 

CLARK, PAMELA 113, 172 

CLARK, STACEY 124, 187 

CLARK, THOMAS 100, 217, 246, 249, 272 

CLARKE, THOMAS 124 

CLAUSELL, VALENCIA 82 

CLAWSON, MICHELLE 82, 240, 250 

CLAY, BENJAMIN 100 

CLAY, TRACY 100, 346 

CLECKLER, DANI 100, 240, 252, 258, 259 

CLECKLER, JEFFERY 82 

CLECKLER, KEVIN 82, 228 

CLEGHORN, JAY 100, 204 

CLEMMONS, LISA 124 

CLICKNER, DAVID 124 

CLIFTON, KELLY 82, 245, 268, 330 

CLIKAS, CARRIE 124, 191, 240, 252, 273 

CLOUD, BRENDA 124 

CLOUD, LAWRENCE 124 

CLOUD, MICHAEL 100 

COATES, ANNA 124, 199 

COATES, JAMES 113 

COATES, KENDALL 124, 181, 247 

COATES, STACEY 113, 195, 202 

COBB, BRENDA 113, 331 

COBB, ELIZABETH 82 

COBB, GREGORY 82 

COBB, HARRY 124 COBB, WENDY 113, 180 

Cobbs, Beth 229 

COE, KELLY 113, 212, 245 

COGGINS, SARA 100 

COHEN, MICHAEL 82 

COKER, GEORGE 100, 243 

COLAPIERTO, CHRISTOPHER 82, 229 

COLE, CARLA 100, 243, 264 

COLE, CONN 82 

COLE, LANCE 244, 274 

COLEMAN, AMELIA 82 

COLEMAN, CHARLES 100 

COLEY, JAMES 113 

COLLIER, CHARLES 82, 342, 343 

COLLINS, MICHELLE 113 

COLLINS, SCOTT 82 

Collver, Catherine 136, 224 

COLQUETT, TRACY 124 

COLUMNA, AARON 82, 229 

COLVARD, MARY 82, 245, 268 

COMPTON, DEBRA 124 

COMPTON, TIA 113 

CONNELL, MELANIE 82, 218, 243, 264, 330 

CONNELL, TINA 82, 245, 268 

CONNER, JAMES 100, 189 

CONNER, LLOYD 124, 204 

CONRAD, LARS 124 

CONRAD, MICHAEL 82 

COOK, CATRINA 82 



COOK, CHARLES 124. 180 

COOK, GLEN 113 

COOK, JAMES 100 

COOK, LAURA 82, 100, 172, 184, 211 

COOK, MICHAEL 82 

COOK, SANDRA 82, 229 

COOK, TIMOTHY 113 

COOLEY, SHARON 84 

COOPER, DIANA 124 

COOPER, STACY 113, 246 

COOPER, VIVIAN 100 

COPE, TONYA 83 

COPELAND, ANGELA 113 

COPELAND, CHRIS 83 

COPELAND, MATTHEW 113, 305, 307 

COPES, MATTIE 124 

CORBITT, JEFFERY 83, 247, 274 

CORBITT, KARA 114 

CORDREY, STANLEY 114 

CORLEY, VALISA 83, 240 

Cornett, Tammy 252 

CORRIDORI, DESA 114 

COSBY, CHRIS 100 

Cosey, Charlie 274 

COSLAN, JEFFREY 83, 228 

Cosson, Misty 210, 211 

COTTINGHAM, GENE 114, 244, 266, 286 

COTTON, JEFFREY 100, 244, 247, 256, 274 

COTTON, WALTER 83 

COUNCIL, SHARION 124 

COURSON, RUSSEL 124, 229 

COVINGTON, ARCHIE 100 

Cowart, Lessie 228 

COX, BOBBY 124 

CRAWFORD, JAMES 100, 242, 258, 276 

CRAWFORD, JOHN 83 

CRAWFORD, MARGARET 100 

CRAWFORD, MARTHA 100 

CRAWFORD, STACIE 100 

CRAWLEY, JAINE 114 

CREEK, GLORIA 114 

CRENSHAW, DEMETRA 124 

CREW, LINDA 124, 180 

Crim, Gretchen 20, 124, 252 

CRISP, LAWRENCE 124, 164, 242, 256, 258 

CRISWELL, RODNEY 114 

CROOK, STEVEN 100 

CROSBY, MONICA 124 

CROSBY, SCOTT 124 

CROUSHORN, JOHN 83 

CROW, CATHERINE 124 

CROWSON, LEXIE 114, 172, 186 

CROZIER, TERESA 100, 165, 240 

CRUMBLY, CHRIS 100 

CRUMPTON, CHARLES 100 

CRUTCHER, MARY 83, 268 

CRUTCHFIELD, SANDRA 124, 195, 212 

CRUZ, ALFRED 248, 249, 276 

CUCALON, MARIA 83 

CULBRETH, TIMOTHY 83 

CULPEPPER, ART 114 

CULVER, RONALD 83 

CULVERHOUSE, JIMMY 124 

CUMMINGS, STACEY 114 

CUNNINGHAM, PAUL 83 

CURENTON, DAVID 100, 248, 276, 331 

CURENTON, SCOTT 248, 276 

CURINGTON, CHRISTY 83, 174, 202 

CURRIE, KRISTIN 83 

CURRY, BETH 114 

CURRY, CHRISTOPHER 100 

CURRY, JUDITH 83 

CURRY, PRINCE 83 

CURRY, STEVE 114 

CURTIS, LAURA 100 

CURTIS, PHILLIP 114, 184, 185 

CURTIS, RANDALL 100, 272 

CURTIS, SAMUEL 124 

CURTO, ANDREA 83, 241, 256 

CURVIN, JEFFREY 136, 270 

CURVIN, TIMOTHY 124 

CUTLER, ALAN 100, 172, 244 

CUTLER, ALLEN 244 

CWALINA, KRISTIN 83, 245, 268 



D 



DADE, THOMAS 100, 324 

DAHL, MIKE 100, 166, 248, 276 

DAILEY, THOMAS 114 

DAILY, CHERYL 83, 245 

DAMRIN. JOHN 114 

DANEK, DANA 114, 267 

DANIEL, MATT 100 

DANIELS, BILLY 100, 184, 195, 217 

DANIELS, DONNA 100 

DANIELS, MICHELLE 100, 245 

DANNER, HEATHER 83 

DANNER, MARC 83 

DANSBY, JASON 100 

DARBY, LATONYA 114 

DARNELL, CHRISTINE 83, 301 

DASHER, THEE 83, 228 

DAUGHERTY, JANET 100, 165, 241, 256, 274 

275 
Daughterly, Kevin 229 
Daughterly, Sean 266 
DAUGHTERTY, KEVIN 83 
DAUGHTERY, LEE 124, 247 
DAUGHTRY, JENNIFER 124 
DAVENPORT, JAMES 124 
DAVENPORT, PATRICK 84 
DAVENPORT, TERESA 136 
DAVIDSON, KAREN 124 
DAVIDSON, SARAH 114 
DAVIS, ANDREW 84, 174, 195, 305, 307 
DAVIS, BENJAMIN 100 
DAVIS, BRIAN 84, 124, 248 
DAVIS, CHERINA 114 
DAVIS, DACRE 84 
DAVIS, DARCY 84, 247, 274 
DAVIS, DAVID 124 
DAVIS, DEMEA 114 
DAVIS, DONNA 124 
DAVIS, DORIS 124 
DAVIS, HARRY 114 
DAVIS, LEARTIS 84 
DAVIS, LISA 114 
DAVIS, MELANIE 100, 240, 250 
DAVIS, RODERICK 114 
DAVIS, SADIE 84 
DAVIS, SANDRA 84, 173 
Davis, Sharon Jo 172, 240, 250 
DAVIS, STEPHANIE 124 
DAVIS, STEPHEN 100, 114 
DAVISON, ANGELA 84 
DAVISON, DEBORAH 124 
DAVISON, GWENDOLYN 100 
DAW, ANGELA 114 
DAWAR, BRENTON 124 
DAWSON, DANIEL 84 
DAWSON, DAVID 114, 166 
DAWSON, KNOWLAN 100 
DAY, CRAIG 100 
DAY, JAMES 84 
DEAN, JACK 114, 248 
DEAN, JOHN 124 
DEAN, KEVIN 100 
DEAN, LORI 84, 241, 256, 415 
DEAN, ROBERT 100 
DEASE, EMILY 84 

DEAVOR, KIMBERLY 84, 240, 252, 272, 273 
DEBOSE, HOPE 84 
DEBROSSE, LOUIS 84, 247, 274 
DEBROSSE, THOMAS 100, 247 
DECKER, SHERRI 124 
DEE, HELEN 124, 180 
DEESE, SCOTTY 114 

DEFALCO, CAPRICE 100, 164, 195, 241, 256 
DEFEE, LEONARD 84 
DEFELICIBUS, GREGG 84 
DEFONTAINE, JEAN 84, 247, 256, 274 
DEHLIC, CHRISTOPHER 114 
DEMOSS, TONYA 84, 241, 256 
DEMPSEY, MARK 100, 248, 317 
DENDY, THOMAS 100, 224, 244 
DENEVE, CHAD 84, 172, 270 







The friendly atmosphere of Troy is portrayed with a simple wave 



1)1 SMS IKWi I 124 241, 256 
DINSIS |AMES I"" 
1)1 nms NADINNA 84 
DENNIS, NAKITHIA 124 

DINSIS I VMM! 84 
1)1 \\V BR! AS Hill 248, 276 
DISS! ( YIHK!S 1J-J 
DIM s| I PUIS 84 
DERAMI 5 DAM AN 84 415 
Dei .iinuv I Icith 4 IS 
DIK AMI s PAMEI A 124 
DIsHIIIDs ( II \ K I I s 100 
DIsMOSD KIM 124 
DINIK EMIl\ 100 
IHtt s( (>| I .'4 
DIW VK BRISI .'48. i28 
DIW BIRR! Ml I A 124 
I'lUIIIRR! SIRIIDY 100 I7S 184 
l)l( (SARI IK ASK 241. 
Dl( HIAKA ( Ml KM 136 
l)l( MRsOS IV! 114 1 '4 24S 268 
IS ( VROIVS 84 

immisx IOSEPH in 246 2 16 272 
DINGMAN MKI H4 .'4 , 
DISSMORI (,l()Kl,l 114 

DIX, rHOMAS 124 
DIXON, ASDRI \ 124 

DINOS ( Mill loo 

DIXOS M ASM! H4 228 

DIXON. Till s 124 

DOBBs ( VK 

DODSON, ROBIR1 84 24b. 249 

DOSXIDsOS ASIMOSY 124 

DOSAIDsOS KOHIRT 100 

DOSAIDsOS I MUM A 84 

DORIM DORslY 124 

DORMIR ( MAKIII 246, 270 

DORslY DAVID 246. 270 

DOSS, (AMES 124 

DOIMAKD (,IOK(,t 124 

DOTY. STEVEN 100 

DOWNING, DA\II) 114 

DOWNS DONALD 101. 276 

DOYLE, VIRGINIA 125 

DO/IIK USUI 114 172 -'41 

DO/IIR MICHELLE 101 

DRIGC.IRs |l AN 125 

DUBBERHY (RANK 101 247 

DUBOSE. CHRISTOPHER 101 

DUCOTE. PAL I A 84 

DUFFY, MARY 84 240. 252. 328. 329 

DUGGAN, ELIZABETH 114 

Dl Is I MIHIA 125 

1)1 Ms Dl ANA 101. 202 

DUNCAN Mil IN 114 

Duncjn. Mjrki 252 

Dunun Peggy 252 

DUNCAN. TRACY 84 24 1 

DUNN. COSSONDRA 101, 175 

Dl NN IKK 114 317 

DUNN. GUY 136 

DUNN. LORI 114 

Dunndvjni Mickey 276 

DUTTON SABRINA 114. 211 

INNYIR DASIH 114 164, 172, 242. 258 

DYAL. DONNA 84 219, 228 

DYBAI A. LINDA 125 

DYBAI A 1HOMAS 101 

DYE, ASDY 247 

DM lll/ABITH 114 

DM Mil HAM 125 

miss CHERYL 84. 224 

DMss KRISTA 114 

DMss Ri ssfll 125 

DMSS. WILLIAM 125 

DYkl RICHARD 114, 246, 270 

DMslMA IINNIIIR 84 218 24 1,264 

DMsIs HNN ARD 84 248. 276 

DMsIS IINNIIIR 101 

DYkls MMBIRIY 101 

DYkls IINDA 125 

l)W)S. RAC Mil H4 241 



E 



EADY. RENEE 101, 240. 250 

EARLY, STEPHEN. 84 

I As! kATHY 125 

I \s I IN, llll 125, 243. 264. 301 

I ATOS. STEVE 125 

EDELBERG. |l II XSSI 101, 243, 264, 330 

EDELBERG, KATHARINE 125, 163 

IDINIllll) MSSY 125, 333 

EDMOND IRANI INE 136 

IDMONDSON EOANNA 84.241,252 

I INN YRDs ASCII 125 

Mm YRDs. BRIDGITTE 84 

IDU ARDS. CORNIIH s 24 i 

I INNARDS DANIII 114 242 258 
HNN YRDs IOIIN 136 

HNN \RI)s MICHAEL 125. 195 

HNX NRDs IMOMAS 125. 248 

IINNARDS TIMOTHY 84 

MORI). Al 125 

EGGLESTON TERRELL 101. 243 

III AND ASHHY 84 

III AND IOSIPH 136 

III AND ROBBIE 84 

IISMIN S YS( Y 101 241 252 

II DIK kINNITM 101.165.247,253,274 
MklNs MARY 101. 218. 243 258 2 
IIIINBl RC LORI 101 

IIIINi.lON TRACY 84 
ELLINGTON DIRIK 84 
ELLIOT! \ll( MAIL 84 
lllis AMI 125 

mis ( k 11 101 

Mils DAYNA 114. 229 

IlllS IKIRI1 114 

lllis Mil 101, 243 

IlllS IONATMVN 84 

(Ills LAI RIE 84 

tills MARK 125 

nils STEPHEN 

Mils IONIA 125 

IIIISON BINIRIY 125 

llllsON LAMES 114 .'42 258 

IHsWOKlll RONALD 84 

ELLSWORTH RON ANNI 1 

ELMORE. GARS u . 5 24C 




Andrea Kurto informs Tobi Wright that it is only Wednesday not Friday. 



1 .1111.1 1 eigh 172 
ELMOKI s\K Ml 136 
II MORI slllll A 114 186 
I NCI ISM I AK A 114 224 
I NCI ISM I AMIS U4, 204 
INCllsll I'AlsY nt, 
INNIS I ISA 101 
IKK ks()N ASDRI W 84 
IKK SON SAM YSTHA 84. 241 
ISKRIDCI ( lllsll 84 
IsiiNCIK II III 125, 172, 268 
|sll\ AKI/ IIDIRK O 84. 184 
ITMIRIDCl IOMNN1 114 
IT/WIHR NAOMI 114 
l\ ANCIIIsl A BIRSAKDISO 101 
EVANS. AMY 84, 240. 250 
l\ ASS ASCII A 12 r > 212 24 1 256 
IN \SS IHIRISA 84 
INIRIl I I Aim 114 172, 195 
INIRs DIME 101. 241 
I /III ASH A 84 



F 



I All s MAR! I Ol 84 

I MR( HUM ( AROI 84 

I AIRl LOTH II III 101 

I Alsos SHAWN 12S 240. 250 

I Mill MINIS 101 

I AlklSBIRRY. STEPHANIE 101.172 

I NlklNBIKK! s| s|| 84. 245 

I NlklNBIKK! WILLIAM 125 

I All IS ASDRI W 84 

I ARAH1I III I 

I VKMIK ( HARI A 114, 243 

I AKMIR ( Y ST III A 114 

I NKMIK kIMBIRl! 114 

I \KM1R Mil HAM 84 

I AKMIK ROOMY 85 

I ARM I II CRICO 85 

I ARRAR PIRR! 85 

I ARRIOR GAYLEN 114 

I ARRONN IONAIMAN 85 

I XI Ik BRISDA 125 

FAUlk STEPHANH 85 

I Al IkNIK IINNIMR 85 

FAULKNIR klllll 85 

I Al IkNIR kIM 101 

I At IkNIR IONI 101 24 1 2h4 

I VI IkNIR Willi! 136 

I N\ VKI IO I XI KA 101 

II YlHIRISGIM IORI 125 199 415 
IIIISMA DAVID 85 244 

FEITSMA I Al KINDA 125 195 

IINN |A! 114 

UNION si AMI! 85 

URCl SON OIRIN 85 274 

IIKCl SON (,|()R| 125 

MRSYSDI/ ROBIN 101 

IIRR! DAYSA 125 

IIKK! IXMI 

IIIIOIR AMY 101 

IIIIDs MUM 85 

IINOI AUK IOMS 

IIS1A1IR IOMS 

IISI A!S()S IOMS llh 

IISS NIK MAII 101 

IISM TIRISA 85 

lilih AriRrl.i HI 

IIICIRNIO IINIOIM! 85 

III/PAIRK k lAMIs 101 ra 228 

FIVIAN NIK Mini 114 

(III SIR ASDRI W 85 244 

Ml K mik ni 1 Kin 125 hi 

IHNNIRs DIBKA 102 24 

Flowen 1 is.i 12 10. I 

HOWIRs s( on 114 
IIO!D ( ARI A 125 
IIOM) ( HARIIs || 
IIOYI) IIOII! 10 



ll()!l) KOBIR1 125 

III 111 IK A 125, 330 

FOLEY. ROGEI 

FOLGER ( HADWK k 102 24. 

KM MAR IASON B 41 

FOOll XSDKIA 114 

IORMAS. PATRICIA 85 

FORTHMAN. MAUREEN 125 

I OR 11 SI SONY A 85,21 0.271 

IOSIIII si sxs Hi 

Fostei 1 n 202 

IOI SI VIS si s\s 114 
KM RSIIK VSOKI A 114 

ion 1 1 DEBOR vm 136 
KNNMK DONNA 85 
Fowlei lilt 178, 228 
KNNMK I AISII 85. 229. 245 
ION M VKcVKI 1 125 
ION ROBIKI 125 
IOXWORIH sl|\|s 85 
IK VS( IS DAI IOS 125 

IK vsklis ( HARLES B! 

IK XSkllS I VI K V 114 

IK MIK DONNA 85. 219. 228 

IRA/IIR ( I Rlls 114 

IRA/IIR HON 125 

IRA/IIR STACY 85 

Fraziei Wendell 102. 330 

FREDERICK. ELIZABETH 102, 229, 243 

IRM TONYA 114 

IRMI AND RIHK (A 85 

IRIIMAS MARY 85 

IRINCM MAY 125 

FRIDAY MONK A B5 243 

F RIE K HI ATIHR 85 242 

IRITH ROBIRT 125 164 I'll 181 

FROST. BARRY 12 

IROsl BOBBIE 102 

FRY E DIANA 114 

I lu-i |imm! ( 172 

II MIR IOIIN 102 

II MIR MMBtRlY 114 125, 143. 164 

K MIR MSIIE 115 24 

II IMR PIBM! 125 2 IS" 228 

II Nk HOMY 102 172 175 204 

M NkHOI s|R (,AK! llh 

FUQUA. IOSEPH 115. 229 



G 



CABAIDON PATRICIA 85 
(.ADDII MAR! 115 
(.AIMS kINI lo. 
CAMBINO MATTHIW II 
Gimblr Mil li, II,- 1. 
CAMBH ROBIRI 115 
CAMBRIH ( IYDI 102 
CAMMA(.I (RAM I s 1 l h 
CAMMII1 AMY 115 
(.ANN IANMS 85 24 
(.ANT ( YNIHIA 11 
CANT! MAR! LEIGH 115 

i' .in u 14 172 

CARNIR ( MIMANI 85 24 
CARRITT BRONDA 10. 
CARRI1T kIMBIRl! 85 24=. 268 
(. VKKI IT MARl I s 12s 
CAR1MAN ROBIN 10. 
(.ARVIN Dl NRI! Wi 24 1 
CASHAW sl\( 1 HS 
. . 

Giuhpohl B.ll 301 

(.Al ss slimiS . H 

(.Al ISI! SOS! A 125 111 
(.A! I AWRIS( I 115 
CAM ARD NIK HAM 102 
ClMMI ( HRISIOPHIR 
CISTR! Rl ss||t 85 
ClORCl IOSI 11 



I .11 rRl > n iHIK T 102 
■ 
HRISOA 115. 308. 309 
CIBBs kINIS 115 
GIBSON asci; A 102 
Gibson. Carolyn 170 
GIBSOS Mil ASIf 85 
CIBSOS SAS( ! 102. 175 191 
GIBSON. PHILLIP 125 1>- 
GIBSOS SASORA 102 
C1DDISS !N ADI 136 
GIIBERT ( AMIRi IN 
GILBERT GLORY 125 331 
CHOIR ( HARM- 
Ulls IISSIHR 115 
GIIGRIS1 TODD 125 
cm GREGORY 
c III ROBERT 85 
Cll MY PHIMIP 125 242 286 
l.H MY TODD 85 
(.lllll ASO BRIAS 102 
GILMIASI) PAICI Ks .4 
GILlllASO TRA( I 102 
CILLIS < HARLES li 
( .11 1 is sIlPMIS 115. 166 
CIIRC3Y OASSY 85 
CISCRAS PITIR 102 
GIORDANO IOHN 102 
(.IRDNIR N1IRIBI1H 11 
(.1 ADDIN PAl 1 A 125 
CI AINMM ( I Al DE 115 

Gl ass GARY 115 
(.1 Ass ROOMY 85 
Gl Ass( HO IM/ABETH 125 
s 115 
• 
CIONIR MAR! 125 
GOOSEY ROBIKI 125 294, 299. 333 
GOINNIN I HIRM BS 

GODWIN klviN 

IWIN sHIRRI 85 
GODWIN sTIPMAN 
GODWIN TIMOTHY 85 
GODWIN WILLIAM 
GOtBH DANID lis 
COIK/IN DEBORAH - 
COIDIN II Ml 85 1-4 
GOIDIN SARAH - 
GOI DIN SI sAN 85 

BIEWSKI Ml< HAM 85 
IRINI 85 
GOODMAN IIMRI! t 
GOODNIGH1 Ri>NN ' 
GOODWIN APRIL 115 300 301 

GOODWIN ( MAR;. 
GOODWIN kRIsT v 

GOOOWIN I 

GOODWIN r amm a 102 

1. OR! kIMBIRl! 
(.OKI! MKHMM 
GOREY sIiphin . 

II kINNITM 102 128 
(.RAMI NOIR DONN V 
GRAHAM AM! 115 
GRAHAM kIMBIRl! 1 
l.RANl AN. 
GRANT. HIGH 

. R INI !OI ANDA 115 
C.R VNTK VM VS. I XI 

MAM Rll A 102 
1 R VSTHAM sHISX M 
l.R A\ 

GRAVIS |AN 
(,RA! ( IIVIINl 85 

OAsiii BS 

|s||Y 85 
N(ARISA ■ 

(.RX! MARl 

SON V AMRIf 11 
(.RMS EMU I 




Jennifer Taylor and Kari Klinzing pose with 
Wade Adams an Alpha Gam big brother. 



GREEN, JAMES 86, 126 

GREEN, JERRY 86 

GREEN, JOHN 115, 242, 258 

GREEN, KIMBERLY 102, 202, 203, 245, 267 

GREEN, LEIGH 243, 264, 330 

GREEN, MARJORIE 126 

GREEN, RISA 86, 240, 308, 309 

GREEN, ROBERT 86, 246, 270 

GREEN, SHERRY 85, 172 

GREEN, WILLIAM 126, 183, 186 

GREENE, DAFNI 102 

GREENLEE, SHAWN 86, 229 

Greenwell, Andrew 266 

GREER, BENJAMIN 85 

GREGORY, ANDREW 115, 247, 274 

GREGORY, JASON 85, 270 

GREGORY, LAURA 126 

GREGORY, WILLIAM 136 

GRESSEL, MARK 126 

GRICE, JOHN 126, 170, 246, 253, 272 

GRIFFIN, DONNA 86 

GRIFFIN, MALVIA 86 

Griffin, Mary 172 

GRIFFIN, SHARON 86 

GRIFFIN, TRACEY 86 

GRIFFITH, DENNIS 126, 172, 194 

GRIFFITH, GINGER 126 

GRIGGS, BENJAMIN 102, 175, 186 

GRIGGS, CHARLES 102, 276 

GRIGGS, IANTHIA 126 

GRIMES, JAMES 86 

Grimes, Kenny 266 

GRIMSLEY, KIMBERLY 86 

GRISSETT, LINDA 126, 240 

GRISWOLD, ANGIE 86 

GRISWOLD, TYSON 86, 247, 264, 274 

GROEGER, OLIVER 86, 184 

GROSS, TRACEY 102, 165, 267 

GRUMMER, KELLY 86 

GULLEDGE, VONDA 115 

GULLEY, MELISSA 136, 187 

GUNN, MARY 126 

GUNTER, DONNA 126, 172, 245, 268 

GUNTER, TRONYA 102, 202 

GUNTER, WILLIAM 115,224 

GUTHRIE, BRIAN 102 

GUTIERREZ, JULIE 86, 241, 252, 277 

GUY, NICOLE 86, 241, 252 

GWIN, DEAN 102, 246 



H 



HAAS, FRANK 86 

HADLEY, JOSEPH 126 

HAGADORN, TAMMY 115,245,268 

HAGAN, TERRA 102 

HAGIN, GREGORY 102, 247 

HAKLIN, DEBORAH 102 

HALCOMB, JULIE 86, 243, 264, 282, 330 

HALE. LOLETA 86 

HALE, TRINA 126 

HALL, ALBERTA 102 

HALL, DARRYL 126 

HALL. DEBRA 126 



HALL, JAMES 126, 195 

HALL, JASON 86 

HALL, JEFFREY 102 

HALL, LORI 86 

HALL, LOVIE 126 

HALL, MICHAEL 86 

HALL, PAMELA 115 

HALL, PATRICK 126, 202 

HALL, RICHIE 126 

HALL, TAMMY 126 

HALL, TUJUANIA 86 

HALL, VERONICA 102 

HALLEY, JULIE 86, 240, 250 

HALSTEAD, CARLA 86, 241, 252 

HAMILTON, KAREN 102, 241, 252 

HAMM, PAMELA 86 

HAMMOND, SUSANNE 102, 202 

HAMMONS, ANGELA 115, 168, 172, 182, 217 

HAMPTON, PATRICK 102 

Hancock, Elna 224 

HANCOCK, LARRY 115, 247, 274 

HAND, MICHAEL 115 

HANSON, DONALD 86 

HANSON, KATHRYN 102, 274, 275 

HARBIN, LEE ANN 115, 224, 228 

HARDEN, CLAUDINE 86 

HARDEN, DALE 102, 244, 266 

HARDEN, LISA 86 

HARDEN, TINA 86, 229 

Hardin, Tina 229 

HARKINS, TOMI 86, 228 

HARP, THOMAS 115 

HARPER, BRIAN 102, 247, 274 

HARPER, LANCE 86, 276 

HARPER, MARY 86 

HARPER, STEPHANIE 86, 245, 268 

HARRELL, ANDY 126 

HARRELL, SONYA 126, 224 

HARRELSON, CHARLES 86 

HARRELSON, JERRY 115 

HARRINGTON, DWAYNE 126, 253, 266 

HARRINGTON, GARYN 86, 240, 250 

HARRIS, AL 126, 243, 283 

HARRIS, AUDREY 115 

HARRIS, BARBARA 86 

Harris, Bill 274 

HARRIS, CELESTE 126 

HARRIS, EDDIE 102, 305 

HARRIS, JOVETTA 86 

HARRIS, LASINDA 127,229 

HARRIS, LORRIE 102, 245, 268, 270 

HARRIS, MARION 86, 202, 203 

HARRIS, PENNY 86 

HARRIS, RALPH 115 

HARRIS, SAMUEL 127 

HARRIS, SHERRY 127 

HARRIS, VALERIA 86 

HARRISON, RICHARD 115 

HARRISON, ROLAND 115 

HART, EUGENE 127 

HART, JILL 102, 240, 250 

HART, ONDREA 102, 172 

HARTLEY, BENNY 102, 247, 274 

HARTLEY, JEFFREY 127, 224, 225 

HARTLEY, KELLY 86 

HARTZOG, SABRINA 102, 243 

HARVEY, KIMBERLY 127, 173 

Harwell, Hal 274 

HARWOOD, BRENT 115 

HASLEY, MONICA 102, 172, 229, 254 



HASLEY, RITA 115 

HASSELL, MICHAEL 86 

HASSEY, SHERRY 115 

HASTINGS, KIMBERLY 86, 240, 250 

H\l( HER, TRACY 127 

HATFIELD. MIKE 102 

HATTAWAY, DEANNA 102 

HATTEN, PAMELA 86 

HAUPT, DARYL 103, 247, 274 

HAUPT, DEREK 103, 247, 274 

HAVARD, SCHERIE 103 

HAWK, RHONDA 86, 229 

HAYES, BARBARA 115 

HAYES, RHONDA 127, 192 

HAYES, THERESA 127, 172, 191, 195 

HAYGOOD, JOSEPH 86 

HAYNER, ALISA 115 

HAYNES, CHAUNCY 86 

HEAD, DONALD 248. 276 

HEAD, JAMES 127 

HEAD, RONALD 115, 195, 248, 249, 276 

HEALY, JOHN 86, 247 

Heard, Lisa 20. 115, 168, 415 

HEATON, LISA 127 

HEATON, KIMBERLY 115, 243, 264 

HEBERT, HUGH 247 

HECK, CHARLES 127 

HECK, DAWN 86 

HEFNER, SCOTT 103, 242, 249, 258 

HEITER, JOSEPH 86 

HEITNER, MARK 244 

HELMS. ALAN 103 

HELMS, DOROTHY B6 

HELMS, JAMES 115 

HELMS, JANE 115 

HENBY, DONALD 127, 248, 276 

HENBY, JOHN 103 

HENDERSON, ANGELA 86, 243, 270 

HENDERSON, BETH 86 

HENDERSON, CYNTHIA 127, 224 

HENDERSON, JUAN 86 

HENDERSON, STARLA 115, 192 

HENDLEY, DONALD 103, 258, 305 

HENDRICKS, BART 127, 181, 191 

HENDRICKS, KATHLEEN 86, 242, 256 

HENDRICKS, TEENA 127 

HENLEY, PAUL 86, 228 

HENRY. BRIAN 127, 178, 228 

HENRY, LOUIS 127 

HENRY, MICHAEL 86 

HEPLER, STEPHANNIE 241, 252 

HERBERT, MICHAEL 103 

HERIOT, DARLENE 86 

HERNANDEZ, JORGE 127 

HERRING, DEBRA 103 

HERRING, JAMES 115 

HERRMANN, IONATHAN 103, 204 

HETZEL, BERNADETTE 127, 168 

HEWETT, JEANNIE 86, 229 

HEWITT, TIMOTHY 86 

HIBBARD, WILLIAM 127, 328 

HICE, RICHARD 115, 246, 272 

HICKS, CHAD 86 

Hicks, Randy 258 

HICKS, TINA 127, 194 

HIGDON, KEITH 127 

HIGGINS, KECIA 86, 241, 252 

HIGGS, ANDREW 103 

HILL, BRIAN 86, 247, 249, 274 

HILL, CHARLES 86 

HILL, JENNIFER 127 

HILL, KIMBERLY 103 

HILL, MICHAEL 115, 199 

HILL, TAMMY 127 

HILLER, WENDY 103 

HILLMAN, MACK 86 

HINCKLEY, CATHERINE 86, 241, 252 

HINES, CARLA 87 

HINES, DEBORAH 127 

HINSON, TRACEY 87 

HIOTT, ERIC 87 

HIPPS, DARREN 115, 166 

HIPSHER, AMY 127, 308, 309 

HIVES, REHOBETH 115 

HIX, LEE 103, 248, 276 

HIXON, LAURA 115 

HOBBS, BETTY 127 

HOBBS, DANA 87, 245, 268 

HOBBS, LISA 127 

HODGE, LUCI 87, 241, 252 

HODGES, WALTER 87, 246 

HOFFMAN, ELIZABETH 87, 243, 264, 330 

HOFFMAN, KENNETH 115 

HOFFMAN, THERESA 103 

HOGAN, ANETA 115 

HOLLADAY, JOY 87, 241, 252, 267 

HOLLAND, ANGIE 103 

HOLLAND, DAPHNE 87 

HOLLAND, MARCUS 115,317 

HOLLAND, TAMMIE 115 

HOLLER, JEANETT 103 

HOLLEY, JOHN 103, 166, 242, 258 

HOLLEY, MICHAEL 87 

HOLLEY, PERRY 115 

HOLLEY, RANDALL 103 

HOLLEY, TONY 103, 305, 307 

HOLLINGER, CEDRIC 87 

HOLLINGSWORTH, DARON 127 

HOLLIS, DAVID 103 

HOLLON, KIMBERLY 127 

HOLLOWAY, KERRI 87, 242, 256 

HOLMAN, DONNA 127 

Holman, John 270 

HOLMAN, TIM 103 

HOLMES, FREDRICK 87 

HOLMES, GALE 103 

HOLMES, JEFFERY 127 

HOLMES, PHILIP 127, 204 

HOLMES, SHARRON 87, 172, 229 

HOLMES, SONDRA 115 

HOLTON, PAMELA 87 

HONEYCUTT, MARTINA 127 

HONEYCUTT, PRISCILLA 103 

HOOKS, LISA 87, 174, 191, 241 

Hoomes, Thomas 183, 189 

HOOPER, TERYAN 87 

HORN, DAVID 87 

HORN, REBECCA 87 

HORNE, REGINA 115, 172, 173, 202 

HORSLEY, JERWANDA 103 

HORTON, JOHN 103, 165, 274, 284 

HOUGH, RANDALL 115, 244, 249 

HOUGH, SCOTT 127 

HOUSER, JEFFERY 115 

HOUSTON, MARIE 136 

HOVEY, WILMER 116,247,274 



Howard, Gayle 309 

HOWARD, JAMES 103 

HOWARD, JASON 103 

HOWARD, LAURIE 87 

HOWARD. MARK 87, 228 

HOWARD, SHANNON 87 

HOWARD, TODD 115, 248 

HOWARD, TRACI 127 

HOWELL, CHRISTOPHER 103 

Howell, Dawn 31, 103 

HOWELL, KIMBERLY 115, 172, 242, 256, 272 

273 
HOWELL, STEPHEN 87 
HOWES, ERIC 115, 166, 228, 247 
HUBBARD. BRYAN 127 
Huber, Heather 49. 87, 242, 256, 274, 275 
HUDLEY, DANIEL 127 
HUDON, SENECAL 116 
HUDSON, ANN 116, 169, 194 
HUDSON, DAVID 103, 246, 251, 272 
HUDSON, GERALD 127 
HUDSON, REGINA 127 
HUDSON, ROBERT 127 
HUDSON, STARLA 116, 195 
HUDSPETH, SHORAN 87, 174, 202, 217 
HUFF, STEPHANIE 103, 243, 272, 273 
HUGHES, CANDACE 103, 202 
HUGHES, DEANNA 116, 229 
HUGHES, JAMES 127 
HUGHES, JOSEPH 116, 178, 228 

HUGHES, LEE 103 

HUGHES, LYNDA 127 

HUGHES, SELINA 116, 245 

HUGHES, STEPHANIE 116 

HUGHES, SUSETTE 103 

HUGHES, TAMMY 103 

HUGHES, TRACY 103, 172, 175, 224. 243, 264 

HUGHEY, ANGELA 116 

HUGHEY, EDWARD 127 

HUNT, AMY 103, 245 

HUNT, CHRISTOPHER 127 

Hum, Ian 105, 127, 247, 274 

HUNT, TODD 116 

HUNTER, LAURA 87, 229 

HUTCHINS, REGINALD 103 

HUTCHINSON, DARLENE 127, 256 

HUTCHINSON, DAWN 87, 174, 241, 252 

HUTCHINSON, MATT 87 

Hutchison, Audrey 103, 175 

HYATT, VICKI 127, 183, 214 

HYCHE, KEVIN 87, 246, 272 

Hyde, Stephania 116, 165 



I 



ILES, JENNIFER 87, 242, 256, 274 

IMMING, AMI 87 

INGALLS, KELLI 87, 241, 252 

Ingalls, Kevin 194 

INGRAM, SHERRI 127, 172 

IRBY, REBECCA 103 

IRVIN, DAVID 116 

IRVIN, KIMBERLY 127, 169 

ISAAC, LYNDON 127, 228 

ISABELL, KIMBERLY 103, 229 

ISHII, TORU 87, 184 

ISOM, CAROLYN 116 

ITSON, TANYA 87 

IVEY, BARRY 127 

IVEY, BEVERLY 87 

IVEY, DANNY 87 

IVEY, ROBERT 127, 224, 229 

Ivy, Donna Jean 264 



J 



JACKSON, ALVIS 87, T74 

JACKSON, BRENDA 127 

JACKSON, DEBRA 127 

Jackson, Hope 22, 127 

JACKSON, JANE 116, 240, 250 

JACKSON, KENNY 247, 253, 274 

JACKSON, MARTHA 127 

JACKSON, STEPHEN 116 

JACKSON, TONY 116, 298 

JACOBS, JOHN 103 

JACOBS, MICKEY 127, 323 

JACOBS, RICHIE 246 

JACOBS, TAMI 127 

JACOBS, TIMOTHY 116, 247, 274 

JAMES, JENNIFER 40, 127. 244, 264, 301 

JAMES, JUNIOR 116 

JAMES, MICHAEL 127 

JAMES, PAMELA 127 

JAMES, TIMOTHY 116 

JAMES, VALERIE 116 

JEFCOAT, MARK 87 

JEFFREY, CHRIS 242 

JENKINS, SHELISIA 87, 331 

JENKINS, VERNON 87 

JENNINGS, EFREM 87 

JENNINGS, NANCY 103 

JERNIGAN, SANDRA 136 

JESSE, VICKY 127 

JINRIGHT, BETSY 103, 244 

JINRIGHT, CARRIE 127, 244 

JINRIGHT, WILLIAM 116, 317, 318 

JINRIGHT, YVETT 116, 186, 192 

JIPP, ELIZABETH 87, 165, 242, 256 

JOHNSON, ALICE 116, 323 

JOHNSON, AMY 103 

JOHNSON, ANDY 103 

JOHNSON, ANN 103, 172 

JOHNSON, CAROLYN 103 

JOHNSON, CLAUDE 87 

IOHNSON. CYNTHIA 103. 127, 241, 252, 267 

JOHNSON, DARLENE 116, 243 

JOHNSON, DAVID 103, 127, 162, 163, 172, 274, 

285 
JOHNSON, DIONNE 87, 174 
JOHNSON, DOUGLAS 127 



HXISsOS IDWIS 116 

IOMSSOS. IAMIS 87 

IOMSSOS |ASI I H' I'M 240 

IOMSSOS tM M K1 12B 

IOMSSOS. IISSIHK 128. 172. 144 202 

IOMSSOS lOHS I ' 

lOMssos iomssi 120 246 270 
lonssos JONATHAN 121 

iomssi in |i i ii g ■ 204 

IOMSSOS K AKI A 120 

lOMssos KERMI1 

IOMSSOS KIKKI 07 240 

IOMSSOS KIM lit, 

IOMSSOS KIMBIKIY 87 

lOMssos I ashaW 128 
Johnson. I ivonU ■'-' , ' 

IOMSSOS I AWRISl I ir 

IOMSSOS llsll |2fl 

lOMssos LINDA 120 

IOMSSOS \||( M Ml 07 120 

iomssi in PAI I 120 249 

IOMSSOS km mi 103 120 I ■ 

IOMSSOS Kit K) 101 

IOMSSOS KOSSII lib 

lohmon Scotl 

IOMSSOS SIIPHASIE 87 

lohnton Stevt 

IOMSSOS si s.\S H~ 172 .' r ,H, 259 

IOMSSOS MKIS( I B" 

IOHNSON. TODD 128. 246. 270 

lohnson l i.n , 2t>4 

IOHNSON WILLIAM 87. 342 

IOHNSTON HI III 1 it, 

IOMSSIOS II St, IK 87 

IOMSSIOS KRIsIA 87, 345, 346 14" 

lohmlon. Paul 229 

IOMSSIOS 1RM II 67, .'44 

IOSIS ADINI 103 

IOSIS l AKIY 103 

lOSIs c Ml MIR 103. 195, 208. 210 

lOSIs IORIY 87 

IOSIS lll/ABETH 10) 

IOSIS, IRIC 87 

lOSIs GARY 116 

IONES. HENRY 87 

lOSIs IASIT 128 

IOSIS |-\sON 87 

lOSIs IIMKtY 128 

lOSIs |oms 128, 207, 228 

lOSIs KISSI1H 116 

lOSIs KIMBIRUY 88. 250 

lOSIs USUI ASSI 40,116,241.275 

lOSIs MARC |A 128 

IOSIS MARIIYS lib. 231 

lOSIs MARK 128 

IOSIS MICHAEL 88. 128. 224 225, 247, 274 

lOSIs SADISE 88 

IONES. RAY 88 

lOSIs RISKIR 128 

lonei Robert 187 

IOSIS ROLAND 103 

IONES, ROLANDO 103 

IOSIS, TIMOTHY 116 

IONES, TROY 116 

lOSIs WILLIAM 128 

IORDAS ( IMMII 103 

IORDAS GIORG! 128 

IORDAN, PATRICK 88 

IORDAS, TAMMY 116, 219. 229 

IORDAS THOMAS 116 

IOSIPM PIIRRE 116. 328, 329 

lOsllS MK Mill! 103 

IOWIRS DOSSA 88 

II MK I ASGELA 116 



K 



KANTOR, GRETA 128. 170 .'44 264 273 
K Mis Ml ATMIR 101 241, 252 
KEEL, MARY 116, 240. 250 

nfhitne) 210 
Ml IOS BRISDA 136 
KM IOS IISDA 136 
Ml in BUBBA 88 
KELLEY, BURTRAM 242 
KM in DAWS BB 
KELLEY, DENNIS 116 
KMIIY, |AMES 88. 116 
KELLEY MARIAS 116 
Kllin KIBKCA 88 
Mill) . siASIOS 104,175,224,228 
KMIIY. YOLASDA 116 
K,IK H.Tt 258 
Ml I Y. BERTRAM 128 
Kim DIBRA 116 
Kim (,ARY 128 

Klin . MMBIRIY 128,169,192,240 
Klin lls\ 244 
Klin MARTHA 88. 172, 211 
KltlY MARY 128 
Klin MK MAM 128 
Klin NANCY 88 
Kemp. Laura 180 
KISSIDY MIIS lit, 
KISSIDY. BARBARA 128 
KISSIDY PATRA 128 
KIS1Y III/ABI1M 88, 228 
KIRMS 1)1 AS BB 
Kl K Ml M. MIT/I 104 244 264 
KIDI) IIRISA 88 
KILGORI KIRK 12B 
KIlllAS si /ASSI 136 
KIIIISI.SWORTH KIMS 104 
KILLOl (.11 IRM IY BH 
KILPMRK K MK MAIL 88 
KIMBll s||M\ 136 
MMBROl CH MK MAM 128 
KIMBROl CH slH'MASIE 88 
MSARD MATIHIW 88 
KISI ARD DASIA 80 
KING ( K>si m iii4 212 -'4i 

KISI, IVMII 104 
KIS(, IISSIIIR lib 

King, Sherrl 194 212 

KISI, slllRW ASSA 116 HI 
KIS(, TROY lib 182 IB" 202, 207 
KIRBY SASI Y BB 219 228 
MRBY sMAROS lit, 1".' 19! 
KIRKl ASD BRI11 128 244 266 



KIKKI ASM ( l( II MB 204 
KIKKI ASM MONO 116 206 207 
KIRKl ASD PAMEI *, 104 
KIRKl ASD MSA B 
KISISIR HRISI I04 
Kl \St. |\Mls I2H 
Kl AY A t.lISS I2H 
KIHSSt MMIDl NORMAN 
KllS/IS(, K AKI MM 24 I 
KSK.III 111 RIYSDY 104 
KSK.MI IOSIPM lit. I20 214 
KSK.MI KISSI Ml 12M 
KSIl.MI KIM 111. .'."t 24 
KSK.MI KIMBIKIY BB 
KSK.MI KOMIKK K 120 24 1 
KSK.MI STEPHANII lib 
KSK.MI 1 MOM As (III 24 
KSK.MIIS KOIIIKI 116 
KSODII K AIMKYS MB 174 
KSOI Is M \KK 1 . 
KOBI I CYNTHIA 
kill II UK MMIY 1"4 24 
KOSIAK KOHIKI 

Koniihl Mauyuki 1M4 
koos SANG H NC 88 
Kopl Suunnt 

KOI IOI K As Mil HAH 104 

KO/IOl |M 120 in 

KR AS/ SHAKOS 120 

KKIIts I HKIslOPHIR 116 

KKIsl MK Mllll 1U4 229 252, 270, 271 

Kl MMII ASIHOSY 116 

Kl SI/ Bill BB, 246, 270 

KISI/ IAS 120 242 256 2 '4. 275 

Kl s|IM \K I AMMY 88 

K\ Msl si) RONAI i 

KY/AK III MM 24 1 252 



I AYMKISt I lAMI' I'M 
I AVAR I Si I 

I awrent »- k rlttinj .' u 

1 AWS DAR< III! lit, 
I AW st , 

I AW SOS IKI MAI A 104 

II A( II 

I I At H s I | >, , 

II AMSS IISSIHK 104 . i 
I I AM I I IIWII 116 
111)111 IMP Mil MAI I I2M 

• i KIMBERI 

unit ii 

IIDKISS RANDAI ' 
1 1 1 jy AKI> HI MHEI 
ill BR Mm ■ 

III BKIAS B'l 

ill CEORCI 104 

III |ACK 104 

III ROsll 1(14 IBB 
III I KMM 

III : 

III VAUGHN 117 

llt.t. DASlll 117 

lll.l. 5HANNON 1(14 

I HIM AS I Al R A 1114 244 

IIHMASS Klin 12B 

IIMARI n ASI.IIISI 1114 

LEON WAN 104 

I IDS \KI) I 1\S H't 

iikoy SHARt I 

I i sin t IIVKIII H't 

II |S()S IOKI 104 14 
IIMPt I II k 

IIMRI 1 II I M K \ 12M 1M1 24 

I IVMII IS I'M I 104 

I I Wis iosiph KM 246, 270 
I I WIS I ISA 11 



■ 
■ 

B ISO 
IO//I IISSIHK 1 

i All 120 II • 

A H't 184 

' 



M 



10 

\ 117 
■ ■ 
MADDOY DAVID 
MADD 104 

MADDOA KIIMN 




Even the Palladium staff gets a break as seen here at Jacqueline Smith's 
dinner party. 



L 



I M IY MARY 89. 211. 228 

I ADSIR IOHSSY 136 

I MORI I M( IOR 89 

I M.IR s| VS 

I \i,l YKDIA MARK lit. 

I MK A I At OHISI HI 165 174 241 251 

I AMB PATRK K 104 244. 266 

I AMB IRM n 104 

I AMBIKI BRIAS 89 

I AMBIKI ( HARIIS 116 

I AMBIKI MK HAH 12H 

I AMBIKI KOBIKI lit 

I AMBIR1H IASA 104 1 

I AMBIK1H SIK 11 Ml 1 16, 182 

I AMKIS WILLIAM 89. 246. 270 

I AMPIIY ( I ARISSA 104 

I AMPin 5ABRINA 128 

I ASDIRS IRAS( Is B'l 24 

I ASDRI M s| A1IR I'M {4 

I asi STEVEN 

I Asi.DOS MELISSA 104 

I ASI.IORD BKYsc 

I ASI.IORD ( VKI 014 

I ASI.IORD KOBIKI 128. 330 

I ASI.IIY BRISDA 89 

1,1'., IB" 

I APP STACE1 104 

I ARC, I MARY MM 

I ARIMIR AMY 116 172 1"' 

I AROl HI Kim 12H 16 

I ARRIMORI DAMD 116 

I ARRIMORI ROSSII H't 

I VKsOS |AM|s l.'B 24: 

I ARl I sHARI Hh 

I AS| II K |OI Ml 

I ASHI Rl IRIDKK K 8'< 

IAMIY IISSIHK 

I AMSDIK | AMIS 128 241 

I AMRl OMBI Mil lib 240 

I AW IRII) lit, 

I AW Al IOI A 104 



I I Wis MARY 120 

I I Wis Mill Hill 128 

IIWIs PISSY 104 

I I Wis ROSALD 89 
IIWIs s||\sl 104 
IIWIS \ VSIss ■. 
IIWIs W AMI 128 
IIWIS Will I AM 1 I 

I I Y\ Y Hill'' 

IIDH lODD 117 17 
IISDIR llll 128 
IISDsn DIBRA 89 
IISDsn KM II VI 
IISDsn si At I 24 
IISIHIRI.IR IRAMS 117 

ust.in di V-. 
I is los MART 
nun u ihir ir 
llllll MARl 

llllll MAK' 
llllll MARK 

LIVINGSTON ID 241 

HMSl.slOS IMXSl II 89 
IIMSI.SIOS KIKKY 104 
LIVINGSTON PISMY 104 
lIMSl.slos I AMMY 117 244 ■ i 
lilt Kl K AKIS B9 174 I 

2hB 
lot KIK KEN 
IOIKI11 THOMAS 
IOI Kill IIS 
IOI KRIDl.l Mil M 
LOGAN 
LOGAN PERI 
lOSt. Ill [l I 

LONG Minn 09 174, 1 
LONG IIURn l.'M 242 258 

IOPRISH K MHIII '. 
IOI I M.LYSON 117 24 

ion iasii 

IOIT IORI 104 244 
IOI1 IDS) A 104 
Loutt, Paul IBS 
IOI is PI II R 12B 

ib ir 



MADIIOA Mil HAI 
MADDOY Willi*' 
MADISt)S PA1RII 

'S sai ND( 
MAGLION ■ • 
MAHADY Mlkl 1' - 
MAHAIHY tll/ABI III 104 
MAHAlin lAMIs 
MMIAHn 

. 104 166 

MALISHAM 

MAIIORY BEN 

■ 
MASS 

MASS DOSSA 180 
MAS'. 
MANNING "HOM 

•ID K A1K '. 
MAR AMAS HIRHIV: 

■■AS 10 Blk 
MARAMAS ■ 
MARIS, 
MARKIRI V • 184 185 

MARl, 

MARRIOI ASSS- ' 

MAKs. . . 

KOHIRT 90 
• 
MARSHA1I [• 
MARSHAll |AME5 

, 104 
■ 
MAR1IS BOk 
MARIIS IK ■ 

f 90 
MARIIS II'. 
MARIIS MMBIR1 • 
MARIIS M • 

MARIIS SOSIA 104 .44 

MAR 

MARIIS 111!' 

MAR ' 11" 

MARIk 

MAR. 



MWO\ IONH 104 

MVsMI MMM\ 129 

MATHEWS \SiM 90 

MMHIWN KRUI 129 

MWHIWs R^ND^ lib 

MM Mill MARIANNI 129 

MM I \RIHUR 90 

MM1 B-\RB\R\ 192 

MMIHUW HOI 11 11)4, 228 

MM 1HIWV |AMES 117, 242, 258 

MATTHIWs Ml OLE 90 

MMIIIIWs MIPHANIE 90. 229 

MATTHEWS. TAMARA 104 

MAUk. I RU) 104. 274 

MAUIDIN, TAMMY 188, 206. 207 

MWttlll IRANK 104,246.270 

MAXWELL, JOHN J17, 318 

M WW ELI, IORI 90, 229 

MAXWELL, MICHELLE 90 

M WW III WILLIAM 129 

MAY, ROBERT 117 

MAY. SHARON 104 

MM I IORRAINE 90 

MAYFIIID MM INI 129 

MAYNE, DONALD 90, 246 

MAYS, CARLOS 104, 166. 243 

MAYS, ( INDY 90 

MAZUR. KEVIN 90 

MCALISTER. CARLA 117 

MCBRYDE, FREDERICK 20, 128 

MCBRYDE, MARILYN 89 

MCCAFFERTY. SUSAN 129 

MCCAIN, GREGORY 90 

MCCALL, ALLEN 117 

MCCALL. BEVERLY 129. 180 

MCCALL, CHRISTOPHER 90, 246, 272 

MCCALL. IOHN 117, 178, 229, 231 

MCCALL, KIM 129, 229 

MCC ALI . KY N A 129, 195, 210, 243, 260 

MCCALL, TAMMY 137 

MCCANLESS, PHILIP 90 

MCCANTS, REGINALD 117 

MCCARLEY. LETICIA 90 

MCCARLEY, WENDY 90,241 

MCCARTHA. IO ANN 129 

MCCARTHY, ELIZABETH 129, 189, 224 

MCCARTHY, RICHARD 117, 195 

MCCARTHY, VICKI 104 

MCCLAIN, CHANDRA 105, 308, 309 

MCCLANEY, VENESIA 90, 174 

MCCLELIAN, CARA 105, 240 

MCCLENDON, WALTER 90 

MCCLUNG, JOHN 117 

MCCLUNG, YVETTE 129, 172 

MCCLURE, IEEFREY 90 

MCCOLLOUGH, RHETT 129 

MCCONNELL, MICHAEL 117, 247, 274 

MCCOOL. ERIC 105 

MCCORMICK, DONNA 117 

MCCORMICK, SHERRY 90, 229 

MCCOY, CHRISSI 90 

MCCOY, (ONATHAN 129 

MCCRACKEN, CHRIS 118, 246, 253, 272 

MCCRAE, ADRIENNE 172 

MCCRARY. CARSON 105. 246, 272 

MCCRARY, |OE 105, 305 

MCCRAW, MICHAEL 105 

MCCRAY, REGINALD 129, 328 

MCCRIMON, WANDA 129, 331 

MCCRORY, CLINT 129, 166 

MCCRORY, JACKIE 129 

MCCRORY, KIM 129 

MCCULIOUGH, JASON 90 

MCCURDY, NATALIE 90, 229, 244 

MCCURDY, REESE 118, 189 

MCDANIEL, BIBI 90 

MCDANIEL, HEATHER 105, 242, 256 

MCDANIEL, JOHN 90 

MCDANIEL, MICHAEL 105 

MCDANIEL, RONNIE 90, 248 

MCDANIELS, KAREN 129, 244, 264 

MCDONALD, RICHARD 118 

MCDONALD, TIFFANY 129, 191, 224 

MCDOWELL, BRAD 105, 242, 258, 284 

MCDOWELL, CALVIN 129, 305 

MCDOWELL, JAMIE 137 

MCDOWELL, ROBERT 105, 244, 266 

MCEWAN, MICHELLE 90, 224, 225, 242, 256, 274 

MCEWAN, PAMELA 118, 165, 242, 258, 259 

MCFATTER, JILL 129 

MCFAY, WILLIAM 90, 246, 272 

MCFILLEN, PATRICIA 118, 250, 270, 271 

MCGEE, DONALD 105, 224, 244, 256, 266 

MCGEE, HEATHER 90 

MCGHEE, VERONICA 90, 242 

MCGHEE, WENDY 118 

MCGILBERRY, PHRAN 136, 224 

MCGILL, DEBORAH 118, 162, 172, 214, 242, 256 

MCGINTY, LESLIE 129, 229 

MCGINTY, MARK 105 

MCGOWAN, MARY 90 

MCGUIRE, CARLISE 90 

MCGUIRE, FEBRA 118 

MCHENRY, WILLIAM 118 

MCKEE, KEVIN 105, 229 

MCKEE, MICHAEL 129 

MCKENZIE, GINA 90 

MCKEOWN, WILLIAM 118 

MCKETHAN, DARREN 118, 258 

MCKETHAN, GINA 258, 259 

MCKINNEY, FLOYD 90, 172 

MCKINNEY, PAMELA 129 

MCKINNEY, ROYCE 90, 330 

MCKINNEY, TERESA 49, 105, 245 

MCKINNON, MICHAEL 90, 246 

MCKINNON, ROBERT 118 

MCKNIGHT, ANITA 129, 180, 181 

MCLAIN, ROGER 105, 202 

MCLANEY, JOHN 90, 174, 224 

MCLAUGHLIN, SONYA 105 

MCLEAN, CINDY 189 

MCLEAN, LISA 90 

MCLENDON, DONNA 105, 241 

MCLENDON, PAMELA 90 

MCLENDON, SHERI 118 

MCLENDON, SHIRLEY 129, 187 

MCLENDON, TAMMY 105, 245 

MCLEOD, BRIAN 105 

MCLEOD, JACQULYN 90 

MCLEOD, RITA 129 

MCLEOD, ROBERT 118 

MCLEOD, WILLIAM 118 

MCLEROY, CHRISTINA 129, 172, 187, 241, 252 

MCLIN, WENDY 105 

MCMIUIAN, JACKIE 33, 129 

MCNABB, AUDRA 105 



MCQUAGGE. EMILY 105 

MCSHANE, MARIAN 277 

MCSWAIN, SHARON 118 

MCSWEAN, MALCOLM 90 

MCTIER, MARY 90 

MCVAY, MARK 105. 340, 342 

MCWATERS, MICHAEL 105 

MCWHORTER, RODNEY 90, 317 

MCWHORTER. SUSAN 118, 212, 241 

MEACHAM, AMY 129, 181 

MEADOWS, JULIE 118, 172, 242, 256, 272, 273 

MEADOWS, RANDALL 90 

MEANS, MACHELL 90 

MEDLEY, JONATHAN 129 

Ml 1)1 1 Y, STEFANIE 129, 183, 244 

MEEHAN, THOMAS 90, 247, 274 

MEEK, PATRICK 118,242,258 

MEILLEUR, RON 129 

MELTON, STONEY 118, 317 

MELTON, TRACY 129 

MENDE, GENT 90, 184 

MENON, GOVIND 90, 191 

MERCER, KELLIE 90 

MEREDITH, BILL 90 

MEREDITH, JOEY 105 

MEREDITH, TIMOTHY 129, 195 

MEREDITH. VOTIE 118 

MERKEL, PAMELA 90. 184 

MERKER, KEN 228 

MERKERSON, SHARON 129 

MERRILL, AMANDA 105, 163, 165, 415 

MERRILL, AUDREY 118, 168, 212 

MESSER, GUY 90 

MESSICK, ANNA 129 

MESSICK, LORI 129 

MESSICK, RANDALL 118 

MEYER, CRAIG 129, 317 

MEYER, JEFFREY 129 

MEYER, SUZAN 105, 242, 256 

MICELI, CRISTINA 129. 30 

MIDDLEBROOKS, WALTER 90, 248, 276 

MIDDLETON, AMANDA 91 

MIDDLETON, DARRELL 91 

MIKEL, JAY 129 

MIKKELSEN, PAMELA 105. 268 

MIKLOS, MARK 166. 195, 246 

MILAM, JOSEPH 118 

MILBRY, CANDACE 105, 195 

MILES, FRANK 105, 229 

MILES, PARALEE 118 

MILLEDGE, CYNTHIA 105 

MILLER, AMY 91 

MILLER, CHRISTOPHER 105 

MILLER, ELIZABETH 105, 175, 204 

MILLER, JEFFREY 105, 228 

MILLER, JOHN 105, 248, 324, 325 

MILLER, KIMBERLY 129, 242 

MILLER, LEO 91, 228 

MILLER, MARK 129 

MILLER, MARTIN 91 

MILLER, MICHAEL 118 

MILLER, PATRICK 129 

MILLER, SUSAN 169, 212 

MILLS, KELLY 91, 229 

MILLS, TROY 91, 184 

MILTON, WANDA 106 

MIMS, ANGELY 106 

MIMS, DOUGLAS 118, 333 

MINCEY, MELISSA 129, 180 

MINCEY, MERIANNE 129, 242, 256 

MINER, PENELOPE 91 

MING, DANIEL 106 

MINGUS, MATTHEW 40, 106, 217, 246, 249, 272 

MITCHELL, AMY 91, 172, 186, 191, 229, 240, 250 

MITCHELL, BRIAN 129 

MITCHELL, CAROL 129, 244 

MITCHELL, JUDY 136 

MITCHELL, KATHLEEN 91 

MITCHELL, KENDRA 118 

MITCHELL, KRAIG 130, 186, 193 

MITCHELL, LOGAN 91 

MITCHELL, MARY 91 

MITCHELL, MATTHEW 130 

MITCHELL, SCOTT 118, 186, 244 

MITCHELL, SUSAN 136 

MITCHELL, TIA 91 

MITHIKA, CAROLINE 106, 172 

MIXON, JAMES 130 

MOBLEY, ANGELA 118, 264 

MOBLEY, KATHY 118, 192 

MOCK, DANA 240, 250 

MOHR, KIMMIE 91 

MOMON, SHAWN 91 

MONCRIEF, MARY ANNE 118, 186, 192, 242, 

256, 258, 259 
MONEY, FAYE 91 
MONEY, JOHNNIE 106 
MONEY, REBECCA 106, 172 
MONROE, VALERIE 106 
MONTGOMERY, RICHARD 106, 195, 228 

MOON, JEFFREY 130, 247 
MOONEY, LAURA 130, 180, 202 
MOONEY, NATHAN 130, 243 
MOORE, CARLOS 106 
MOORE, CARNETRIS 118 
MOORE, FREDA 130, 331 
MOORE, GORDON 106, 195, 224 
MOORE, JUANITA 130 
MOORE, NANCY 192 
MOORE, OLA 130 
MOORE, PAULA 118 
MOORE, ROBERT 91 
MOORE, ROY 136 
MOORE, SHIRLEY 106 
MOORE, TONI 106 
MOORE, WANDA 118,331 
MOORE, WILLIAM 130, 172 
MORAN, LISA 106 
MORELAND, MARSHA 187 
MOREMAN, EDWIN 118 
MORGAN, CHRISTINE 118 
MORGAN, CHRISTOPHER 130, 208, 210 
MORGAN, DEBRA 91 
MORGAN, JOE 130, 184 
MORGAN, MEREDITH 118, 242, 256 
MORGAN. ROBERT 91 
MORGAN, WILLIAM 91 
MORIN, STEPHANIE 106, 244, 330 
MORRIS, MELISSA 91, 118, 252, 301 
MORRIS, MICHAEL 136 
MORRIS, SHERRI 244, 264 
MORRISON, SCOTT 106 
MORROW, ANISSA 106, 219, 228 
MORROW, DORSEY 130 

MORROW, KAREN 118. 172, 175, 191. 240, 250 
MORROW, KATHERINE 130, 187 




Miss TSU contestants watch their competitors/ 
while awaiting their turn. 



MORROW, MIKE 204 

MORROW, NELSON 130, 228 

MORROW, WAYNE 91 

MORTELLARO, JERRY 118 

MORTON, MICHAEL 118, 342 

MOSELEY, MICHAEL 91 

MOSLEY, MICHAEL 258 

MOSS, DERRICK 91, 174 

MOSS, MARYCAROL 130, 97, 241 

MOTES, JANET 118 

MOTES, JENNIFER 91 

MOTLEY, EVA 130, 242, 256 

MOTON, GAIL 118, 254 

MOULTON, ELIZABETH 130 

MOULTRIE, MICHELLE 106, 175, 219, 229 

MOULTRIE, SANDRA 130, 173, 242, 256 

MOULTRY, CYNTHIA 130 

MOUNT, DARYL 130 

MOYE, TAMMIE 118, 194,244, 256 

MULLEN, ALICE 137 

MULLINS, RONNIE 118, 246, 249, 272 

MULLIS, MELISSA 91 

MUNDY, CAROL 106, 241, 252, 267 

MUNDY, DEBORAH 91 

MURDEN, TAMMY 130, 244 

MURDIX, JOHN 106 

MURDOCK, JAMES 130, 181, 244 

MURPH, JAMES 106, 246, 272 

MURPHREE, STEVE 118, 270, 246 

MURPHY, DENISE 91, 228 

MURPHY, JASEN 91 

MURPHY, KELLI 91, 241, 252 

MURPHY, MEREDITH 91, 172 

MURRAY, CORNELIUS 130 

MURRAY, DEBORAH 130 

MURRAY, JOSEPH 130, 240 

MURRAY, TARA 91, 241, 252 

MUSICK, KAROL 91 

MUSICK, MICAHEL 130 

MUSSLER, EDWARD 106, 246, 270 

MYERS, CLARK 130, 249 

MYERS, JAMES 91 

MYERS, PATTI 136 

MYERS, SHERRY 91 



NEWTON, PATTY 106, 242 

NICHOLS, GRANT 91 

NICHOLS, JAMES 91 

NICHOLS, LOIS 118 

NICHOLS, PHILIP 91, 246, 270 

NICHOLS, SUSAN 91 

NICHOLSON, HARLEY 118, 202 

NIEKRO, JOHN 91 

NIX, LESTINE 91 

NIX, SHANNON 91, 264 

NOLAN, JULIE 106, 183, 242, 256 

NOLIN, AMY 91 

NOLIN, DALE 118 

NORDMEYER, FREDRICK 118 

NORDMEYER, MARGO 130, 180 

NORMAN, MARY 91 

NORRIS, CHARLES 130, 195, 246, 251, 270 

NORRIS, JACQUELINE 118 

NORRIS, SCOTT 118, 270 

NORSTROM, JAY 130 

NORSWORTHY, MARILYN 130 

NORTON, CHARLES 106, 247, 274 

NORTON, JIM 274 

NORTON, LISA 130 

NORTON, SONYA 106 

NORTON, VIRGIL 130 

NUNNELEE, TERRY 91 



o 



N 



NAFTEL, KELLY 106, 277 
NAGY, MICHAEL 91 
NAPOLI, STEPHEN 91 
NASH, NEAL 40, 247, 249, 274 
NEAL, TODD 130 
NEELY.CHARLES 118, 229 
NELSON, AUDREY 130 
NELSON, CYNTHIA 130 
NELSON, OLGA 91 
NELSON, REGINA 130, 229 
NEWCOMB, MARK 91 
NEWMAN, ROBERT 118, 246, 272 
NEWSOME, JOHN 106, 178, 228 
NEWTON, KIMBERLY 130 



O'CONNOR, SHANNON 118, 229 

O'HARA. SEAN 91, 174 

OATES, SHERRIE 118, 172 

( )I).\NII I Mil II \l I 106 

ODEN, DEXTER 106, 166 

ODOM, SHERRY 118, 172 

ODOM, SHONDA 118, 252 

OGBURN, GENA 118 

OGBURN, STEVEN 91, 244, 266, 328, 329 

OGDEN, LESLEY 130, 168, 172, 181, 241, 252 

OHMAN, ALISON 107, 169, 175 

OHMAN, VALERIE 130, 168, 169, 184, 186, 229 

OPICHKA, DANIEL 107 

ORBAUGH, CAMERON 91, 163, 247, 249, 253, 

274 
ORR, TEREASA 107 
OSBURN, JOHN 107, 247, 249, 274 
OSMER, RICHARD 91, 258 
OTT, NATHANIEL 91, 244, 266 
OUTLAW, AMY 107 
OUTLAW, RHETT 107 
OVERSTREET, LONNIE 107 
OVERTON, DELIA 130 
OWEN, AMANDA 91, 174 
OWENS, ANGELA 130 
OWENS, CHARLES 107, 172, 175, 184 
OWENS, GREGORY 130 
OWENS, JOHN 91 
OWENS, MARCUS 107, 246, 272 
OWENS, PAMELA 107, 175 
OWENS, SUSAN 107, 241, 252 



paramori 

paramori 
par amok i 
paramoki 



258 



PADCI i i Iohn mi 
P mil i i [ KATHERINI 91 
PAOCI m kiin i IB, -'44 
padu ii. Usui 91 229 
PADCI I I miiinda no 192 

PACE, ANl.ll A 118 

PAI MIR I I Ml III' 

PAL MIR, PA IRK K 107 

PAL MIR. SARA 107 195, 240 

PALMISANO Ils\ 107 Ml 241 252 .'74,275 

282, -t is 
PALMORI R A< Mil 107 
PANAC.I As DANIIIII Ml 
PANIIORsI IINN) 107, 172 
PANIOV lis .'4ii .'.ii 273 
PANTOS II SMI IK 107 118 
PANTOV MOMAS 107 246 251 

PARAMOKI HIIIDN) Mil 

BRADU) HO 

\I\KI is no |6S .'4 1 

Ml( II Ml 118 

IK \( I 175 
PAR HAM, Mil II Ml 130 
PARISH IOSIPH MO .'47. 272 
PARISH MAR) 211 
PARK, AM1A 91. 174 

pakkir mm 'ii 

PARKIR BRINDA Ml 

PARKIR DIANI 91 

PAR MR IAMES 91 

PARKIR II DY 131 

P-\RKIR. KAIHRIN 131 

PARKER, PATRICIA 131. 244. 264 

PARKMAN BRINDON 91 

PARNELl, SCOTT 91 

PARRIS, DOUGLAS 107 

PARRISH |l RIMY 107 

PARRISH KIMS Mil I9S ."J 

PARRISH su\ AN Ml .'47, 272 

PARSHALL, Willi AM Ml 

PASCHAL. TANQUILLA 107 

PATH RITA Ml, 184. 185 

PATTERSON. BARBER A 249 

PATTIRSON, BRITT 91, 229 

PMllRsos C ARRII lib 

PATTERSON, GERALDINE 107 

PATTIRSON I AMIS 'II 

PM1IRSOS WAIT I R Ml 

PAXTON, PENNI 131 

PAYNE, ALICIA 118 

PAYNE, JIMMY 131 

PAYNI MAIN 118, 228 

PAYNE, MICHELE 118, 186, 192 

PAYNE, PAUL 107 

PEACOCK, AMY 91, 242. 256 

PI MOCK, ANGELA 118, 131 

PEACOCK, CHARLES 119, 172, 186 

PEACOCK, MARY ASS 92 228 

PEACOl k sni'll ANIl 107 

PEACOCK, TAMMY 107, 119 

PEARSON, TERRIN 92 

PECCI, STACY 107. 245, 268 

PECCI TRACY 119, 268, 270, 271 

PELTON, DERRICK 107 

PINDIITON 11)11 .'44 264 

PISS MI1ISSA 92 

PENNINGTON ( H ARLls 92. 228 

PISSISC.IOS IRIK 92. 330 

PISSISl.ION. ROBERT 107 

I'INNINl.ION W AIM 107 

PEOPlls KISS! HI 119 

PIRM I 1 Ml( MULE 92 

PIRDL I , AICM 9.' 

PERRY, ANGELA 92. 218. 241, 252 

PIRRV MATTHEW 92 

PIRRY, ROB 107 

PIRR) Will KM 92 

PIRR)MAN, FRANCIS m 

PETERS RHONDA 1 II 181 

PI IIRsON PAIKK IA 92 

PETERSON, TODD 131 

PI IHII |OANNA 111 

PI Mis, DAVID 107, 245 

PI I IIS. KELLY 245, 268 

PI III s WARRICK 10", 330 

PI/ISI Mil IIMI 92 172 

PHI IPs MIKE 131 

PHILLIPS. CATHARINE 107, 183 

PHILLIPS. CRAIG 107 

PHILLIPS ions 92 

PIIIIIIPs SAME II 119 

PHILlll's si \ ( || 119 

PIIIIIIPs IAMM1 119 

PHILLIPS 1IMOIH) 92 247, 274 

PI III PO I HIAIRD 107. 240 

PI III PO I BRADIIY 92 

PIA//A \IR(.INIA 111 199.245.268 

Pl( HARD. REID 274 

I'll Ml I ARI 92 

I'll Mil HI SI 1 A 107 

I'll Rll III 1(1 A 119.189,218.242.256.258.259 

PIE Kl I IINN) .'4.' 25b 

PIIRll sASDRA 107,270,271,301 

PIIRC I VIRGINIA 92 

PIKI. PHILLIP 136 

PI1CHIR. TIRR) 92. 24J. 258 

PIMIENTA l.ARRK K Ml 

PIPER. PHIIIIP 92 

PIPPINS MAR) Ml 

PI1RI 111 lOSI '..' 

PITTMAN \sdriw Ml 

I'll I MAS (.RIGORY 107 
PITTMAS II III s 107. 294. 295 
PITTS. KARA I) 92 
Pills sadisi 92 174 

Pills 1HIRISA 107 

PI Ml) I I II Rll 92 

I'llss MIAIN 111 228 

PI I si R DOS Ml. 172 

POI 1IIOMAS |19 

POKE, Will II in" 229 

POIK ( HARIls 107 210 .'45 266 

POll AK DIASSI 107 

POLI ARI) Kill) Ml. 330 

POLLARD. A AlERI 119 

PONTHIER. ANDREA 92. 256 

POOLE. ASHH) 'i.' 

POPE. AMY 92, 224, 244. 264 

POP! ANSA 107 250 



POPI DIM 1,1 As Ml 

POPI MAR) 111 

POPI ROHIRI 111 

PORIIR W Al UK 10 .47, 272 

PORIIIIII) llll 92 

POSE) l)AR)l 92 

poi is ioi 92 .'4., 

POI S( I) KIIOSI' 
POI S( 1 [AMIS 107 
POWIII \S(,II I 
POWIII BRINIM 
POWIII DOSS) 119 

powiii PAI LA 1 
POWIII ROSAII) 132 

powiii iim 132 
powiii \is( l 13 

POWIII WISH) I 

powirs |OHI 

PRATER M ARk 107 

PRESTON i.i ) 22 132 

PKISIOS IIIIRI) 132 

PRI\ A I I HIM A 187 

I'KK I ( ARI \ l 12, 268 

PRK I ( AKODS 92 

PRIl I DAAII) 132 

PRK I DOSS \ 92 .'41 J52 

PRIM Kill) 119 .'4.' ,",b, 267 

PRK I KIMBIRI) 92 191 

PRK I SAIMA 92 

PRK I RAYMOND I 12 

PRIl I SHAWN 92 242 

PRK I USA I )2 

PRK I IRO) 92 .'4b, 270 

PRK I \K lORIA III 

PRIl )i .IS SHIRK I I ■ 250, 258, 259 

PR()\ ANl HA )l I MAS Mb J28 

PUCK I II MS 132, 186, 247 

PI I Kl I 1 s All II 107 

PUGH, Asi.il \ 119 212 

PUGH. (,RI(,OR) 107 243, 258 

PUGH. iamis 92 229 231 

PUGH, 1 1 s| |) 119 

PUGH, SABRIN A 92 174, 202, 211 

PI RIIO) I ANl.ll \ ! 12 

I'll I siiPHEN 92, 272 



QUARLES, SUSAN 119 
QUINN, ZAN 107, 240. 250 



R 



RABREN TON) 132 

RACH. 1IMOIH1 107 

RADIORD AIRI.INIA 132 

RAD/IK, KAROS 92 .'.'9, 250 

R MIMING, DIANNI 119 

RAINES AM) 119 240 

R \IS|s RISSII 92 

R MSI) DAVID 119, 195 

RAIN!) RON AID 92 

KAMM Mil HAH 92 

RAMSEY, ANGELA 132 

RAMSEY, ROBER1 4-1 107 247, 274 

RANSOM ( II ARIIs 247 

RAP! NORM \N 92 

RASH. KIM 132, 172, 191, 195 

R Al I IRSON D ANNA .'4 1 25.' 

RAWLS. JAMEs H9 

RAYSIN, LISA 92 

REAVES, DONALD 132, 202 

R! Wis. MART) 92 

REDDING. ERANK 107 

REDDOCH, DONNA 107 

REDDOCH. KIM 272. 273 

REDMON, MIC HAEI 

RIH) ANTHONY 119, 305, 307 

REED. BERNARD 132 

REED. KIMMIE 92, 308, 311 

Rll!) SHARON 132 

REESE, GREGORY 107 

KHAIs sTIPHANII 92, 244, 264 

RUMS SUZANNE 92, 244 

REGIS1IR IIKIsa 132 

REID, KATHIRINI 184 

RHH) I.IANNA 107 

REISCH. ANGELA 132, 168, 180 

REMUS, WI1IIAM 10 1!') 172 

RINIRO IAMII 92 2 

RENEROE, ROBERT 108. 247, 272 

RINT/ KIMBIRI) 92 

RISPRISS WANDA 119 

RtYNOlDs |A( Ql IIINI 132 

REYNOIDS IOHN 132 

RDNOIDS KAIR1N 92 .'44. 301 

RDNOIDs RII.INA .'4.' 256 

RDNOIDs SCOT1 92 .'.'8. 266 

RDNOIDS SHI I 111 132 244 

RDNOIDs TODD 92 

RHODES IAMIS 119 

RHODES MARI A 92 

RHODIS SC ARIITT 132 

RIMS USA 108 

RIB! IRO. ALMBITIT 132 

Rll I Hill 182 

Rll I Dl HUH 132 

RK I KIMBIRI) 108. 173 

RK I ROBIR1 108 217 247 

RK H ( HRIS 132 

RIC HARD IOHN 

RK HARDS DAMI) 92 

RIC HARDS IIK.HANN 92 .'41 

RICHARDSON ( HARIIS 119 

RK HARDSON Ill/AHI 111 92 

RK HARDSON (,INA 108 

RK HARDSON KIM 119 

RK HARDSON KRISTIN 132 .'45,268 

RICHARDSON I ANNII II.' 

RIC HARDSON DD ' 

RK HARDSON MARTHA 132 

RICHARDSON Mil HAH 92 

RK HARDSON STARLA 92 

RICHARDSON I Rill 92 



RK HBI Rl. IORI 132 
RK Hill Rl, Willi I 
RK HUP IOI IS lot! 
RIDDII IEFFRI 
RIDI.IW A) DAMI) 108 
RID(.WA) BRIAN 132 4. 
KIDl.W A) MARISA 119 
RIDOIPH WILLIAM 
RIGGS RIDI' 

RK.l.s ROBIN Hi, 
RUM IIRM-. 
RIID HOWAI 

OS) A 93 

Kill , IIRR) I32 

Rll IISHOI SI 

RIMRs NK ► 

ROAl II |lll Iim 268 

KOAC II Ml Kl lit' 

ROARK MARSHA 10 

ROHHISS K A I MY 132 

ROHHISS KIM I I. 

ROHIRIs ALLISON 

ROHIR1S Hi ,' \U 

ROHIRIS IOSIPH 132 

ROHIRIs k A I II) 119 274, 275 

ROHIRIs R ASIX . 

ROHIRIs M< IOR 132 '46, 270 

ROHISI lit IRAl I 119, 187 

ROBISSOS IMMA M<( 

ROBINSON USA 93 108, 165. 172. 2. ■ 

ROBINSON RII.INA 93 119 

Robinson Ion) 132 195, 228 

Kill HIsllK IRK 93 .45, 266 

RODINBAI 1,11 ION 132, 172 

RODI.IRS DAPIINI 108 

RODNI) l.RAl HIA 93 128 

ROI IAMIS 9J 

ROI RODNI) 132 

ROl.IRs I HARIIS 33, 108, 243. 258 

ROI. IRS Rl SMI | 

ROI I IN(, Rl B) 132, 229 

ROMANO si /ANNI 108, 172. 212 . 

RON!) WAI1IR 119 

RODS I |)MOl III 93 

ROOT KATHKAN 132 

ROS| MARK 119 .'-4. 324 

ROM Mil HAII MM 

ROSINOl isl IRAl ) 1-5, 242, 256 

ROstNlKAIIR Rl TH 119, 184, 211 

ROSHON, MICHAEL 132, 173, 184, 186 

ROSS. AMY 93 

ROSS SHANNON 93 

ROltN, LISA 244, 264 

ROUTZONG, ROBIR1 132 

ROWMR RODNI) 119 

ROISTIR SON) A 93 

RUCKER, PAIGE 242 

RUDDER, TAMMOTHY 93 

RUDOLPH, ERIC 108 

RUMPH. GARRY 132 

Rl si| MICHELLE 132, 244, 273 

Rl SHING GARY 108 

Rl SUING, JEFF 246, 270 

Rl SNAK BELINDA 119. 217. 244, 264. 330 

RUSSELL, DOUGLAS 119. 228 

RUSSELL, EVA 136 

RUSSELL. MANNING 93. 202. 207 

RUSSELL .sTIPHANII 22 108,242.256 

RUSSELL, shun 'M 

RUSSELL. THOMAS 132 

RUSSO, MARC 132, 317 

RUTHERIORD ANGELA 108,202,203 



Rl IIIDi.t RA( HI 
Rl II I DC I WHIM' 

■ 



SABAIi 
SAB* 

SAL Til 108 

SANE 

■ 

■ 
■ 
■ 

■ 
SANDIRs Mill 
SANOEI 
SANi II • 
• 
SANDIRS ROBIRI 101! I 

108 
SANIIM 
■ 

SASS1R 

SASSIR lOMMII 108 

• IDA IIIIRI ■ 
sAI is Hill ' 256 

SAI is IOSI 

■ EDDII 119 
SAI NDIRs PAIK K 136 
SAWYIR IOMNA • 

■ 
sc ARHROI GH . INI 
sc arhrc ii i.ti WILLIAM 
si ARI 

'.DRA 100 .• 
si HIRl W ADI 119 248 
s( IIMI Dl DAN • 

■ HUD Mil > I .'80 

s( HOIIIID 1 AMM) 132 181 
m HI )RN SHIRI 108 24' 
s( HROIDIR SHAN 2S6 

SCOGIN ( )NIHI* 
si OH AH( I 131 
SCOT1 ( HRISIOPHIR 119 
S( Oil |IMM) 111 
SCOTT MARTHA 108 
si oil SI v M l.MS 108 
si Oil UNA 108, 181 
sc OI 1 WIIUAM 108, 330 
- BR) AN 10« 244 
S| ARs lOHl 119 210 




The incoming mail is no challenge for Chip 
Vice; it's done in a flash. 



s| \Y UNII 108. 172 

M *,1 lOMMIE 93 

Mil NEVILLE 93 

SIIRY I DIN 93. 240. 250 

Mil P\ls> 119. 199, 202 

slllIRs C ARl 119 

SIM IRS IOMN 93 

smuts KATHARINE 108. 172, 175 

s|N\ ( *MIUI 9! .'40 

s|\s I HANNINC 93 

SINN PMRICIA 13b 

s|ss|()Ns s|l|N\NIK)NI \ 1 13, 181 

smill ANDREW 119. 166. 330 

SIMON. BARBARA 133 

SEXTON, MICHELLE 108, 242, 256 

sllADDIX, MICHAEL 93 

SHAHADY, IOSEPH 108, 182, 342, 343 

SHAMBURCER, STEVEN 108, 165. 246 

s|i\Nk |OI)l 119,168,212,214,215 

SHARP CHRISTOPHER 133 

SHARP, PATRKK 108 

SHARPE, ELLIE 119. 188. 241, 274, 275 

SHAW, GREG 93, 229 

SHAW, MICHAEL 93 

SHEALY, IOSEPH S3 

SHEPARD, MELANIE 119,244,264 

sHIPHIRD CHARLES 133, 207 

SHIPHERD, THOMAS 108, 166 

SHERA, RICHARD 133, 228, 266 

SHERIDAN, BRENDA 119 

s||IRV\OOD. CLARK 93 

SHETTER. MICHAEL 93, 246 

SHIELDS, |OEL 246, 270 

SHIPMAN, LIONEL 93, 195, 228 

SHIRAH, IONATHAN 133 

SHIVER, KANDICE 93, 165, 240, 250 

SHIVER, NANCY 108, 202 

SHOEMAKE, NICOLE 93, 229 

SHOEMAKER, MARK 108, 247, 272 

SHOEMAKER, MICHAEL 119 

SHONK, RHONDA 119 

SHORES, DEBBIE 133 

SHORES, LORI 133 

SHORT, WILLIAM 93 

SHORTER, DANIEL 108 

SHOTWELL, KELLEY 93, 322, 323, 331 

SHOWS, KERI 133 

SHOWS, MARY ASHLEY 108 

SHUMPERT, WILLIE 119, 312, 317, 318 

SHY, IACQUELYN 93 

SIGERS, JERRELL 108 

SIGMON, JEFFREY 93 

SIGURGEIRSSON, EINER 184, 324 

SIKES, DAVID 93, 224, 246 

SIKES, NANCY 133, 184, 194 

SILCOX, GREGORY 108 

SILER, DELOIS 133 

SILVA, GUS 266 

SIMMONS BRENDA 93, 174 

SIMMONS, CINDY 268 

SIMMONS, HERMIA 108, 172, 254 

SIMMONS, IACQUELYN 93 

SIMMONS, LEE 258, 259 

SIMPKINS, WAYNE 133 

SIMPSON, KELLEY 119, 195, 321, 323 

SIMPSON, LISA 93, 184, 202 

SIMPSON, PAMELA 119, 224 

SIMPSON, PETER 119, 184 

SIMPSON, WARREN 93 

SIMS, DAVID 108, 243 

SIMS, EDWARD 93, 229 

SIMS, FAITH 119 

SIMS, KIMBERLY 108 

SIMS, STEVEN 119 

SIMS, SUSAN 108 

SIMS, TERESA 108 

SIMS, TRACI 108 

SINGLETON, |ODY 119 

SINGLETON, RODNEY 93 

SINGTON, FRED 93 

SIRMON, LISA 108, 242, 256 

SITZ, MELANIE 93 

SKEEN, LISA 119, 224 

SKEEN, ROSALINDA 133, 175, 182 

SKEEN, STEVEN 133 

SKELTON, KEITH 119, 165, 172, 182, 199, 243, 

258 
SKIPPER, IEFFERY 133, 340, 342 
SKOWRON, SUSAN 119, 268, 330 
SLATON, PAULA 93 
SLATTERY, ERIN 93, 240, 250 
SLAUGHTER, ANTHONY 93, 247, 272 

SMALL, CHRISTOPHER 133 

SMALLWOOD, LAMAR 133 

SMART, DAVID 136 

SMARTT, MARK 137 

SMELSER, LYNNE 119, 204, 224, 245, 268 

SMELTZER, KARL 108, 253 

SMITH, AMY 93, 108, 195, 241, 252, 274, 275 

SMITH, ANGELYN 94 

SMITH, BARRY 108 

SMITH, BERKLEIGH 94, 168, 217 

SMITH, BURTON 108, 246, 270 

SMITH, CARL 94 

SMITH, CARLOTTA 119, 245, 268 

SMITH, CATHY 133 

SMITH, CHRISTOPHER 133, 137, 274 

SMITH, DAVID 108, 228 

SMITH. DEBRA 108, 219, 229 

SMITH, DEREK 120, 195 

SMITH, DONALD 120 

SMITH, EVA 108 

SMITH, GLEN 120 

SMITH, HEATHERLY 120 

SMITH, IEFFREY 120, 248 

SMITH, JELAYNE 133, 191, 195 

SMITH, KEITH 94, 243, 258 

SMITH, KIMBERLY 108, 242, 256 

SMITH, KITTIE 120 

SMITH, KYLE E. 94, 243, 258 

SMITH, KYLE R. 94, 195, 247, 274, 415 

SMITH, LAQUAN 137 

SMITH, LAURIE 133 

SMITH, LEE 120 

SMITH, LONNA 94, 240, 249, 250 

SMITH, MARGERET 133 

SMITH, MARK 133 

SMITH, MICHAEL 120, 133 

SMITH, MICHILE 20. 108 

SMITH, PAT 243, 249, 258 

SMITH, PATRICK 133, 243, 249, 258 

SMITH, PENELOPE 120 

SMITH, PHILLIP 94 

SMITH, RHINELIA 133 

SMITH, RHONDA 94, 229, 252 

SMITH, ROBERT 94, 245, 266 




Kim Heaton and Elecia Boutwell discuss their plans for the summer 
before their Kappa Delta sister's meeting. 



SMITH, SAMUEL 94, 229 

SMITH, SANDRA 94, 241, 252, 301 

SMITH, STANFORD 94, 194 

SMITH, THERESA 94 

SMITH, TIMOTHY 108, 120, 133 

SMITH, TOBEY 108, 258, 259, 301 

SMITH, XANDRA 94 

SMOTHERS, BESSIE 94 

SMOTHERS, STEPHEN 94 

SNEED, DELTRA 133 

SNELL, DEVON 133, 195 

SNIDER, CHRISTOPHER 120,210 

SNODGRASS, MARK 108 

SNOOK, CARMELLA 184 

SNOW, SUZANNE 94, 244, 264 

SNYDER, GLENN 94, 246, 270 

SNYDER, ROBIN 94 

SOBOTTKA, DIANA 120, 172, 195 

SOHN, JENNIFER 109, 194, 415 

SOTO, GINA 120, 245, 268 

SPANN, RICHARD 133 

SPEAR, TAWANA 109 

SPEARS, GREGORY 137 

SPENCE, RACQUEL 94, 242 

SPENCER, CYNTHIA 133, 254 

SPENCER, TRACY 243, 260 

SPIKES, TERESA 133 

SPIRES, QUINN 109, 202, 203, 224 

SPIVEY, ARTHUR 120 

SPIVEY, KEVIN 133 

SPIVEY, MICHAEL 109, 160 

SPIVEY, ROY 94 

SPIVEY, WILLIAM 137 

SPOONER, MARY 109, 228 

SPRAGUE, LISA 120, 240, 250 

SPRUELL, STEPHEN 94, 266 

SPUR1IN. SKIPPER 133 

SPURLIN, TINA 133 

STABLER, ERNEST 109 

STABLtR, KATHLEEN 133, 244 

STAFFORD, GREGORY 120, 248, 276 

STALLWORTH, AMANDA 94 

STALLWORTH, WILLIAM 109, 247, 272 

STANCIL, DAVID 94, 276 

STANDERFER, WILLIAMS 120 

STANLEY, JANEEN 133 

STANSBURY, VINCE 20, 94, 162, 172, 243, 251, 

258, 415 
STARCHER, RUSSELL 120, 229, 231 
STARKS, CYNTHIA 133 
STARKS, KEITH 94 
STARLING, ALTON 137 

STEARNS, STEPHANIE 109, 229, 244, 264, 267 
STEELE, SCOTT 164, 165, 253, 266 
STEELE, SUZANNE 120, 165, 242 
STEGALL, MELANIE 94 
STEINER, JEFF 247, 274 
STEINER, JEFFREY 120, 247, 274 
STFINHFIMER, DAVID 184 
STENGER, ROBIN SAPP 189 
STEPHENS, CYNTHIA 94 
STEPHENS, DEBORAH 109 
STEPHENS, JAMES 94 
STEPHENS, JENNIFER 94 
STEPHENS, LESLIE 94, 241, 252 
STEPHENS, LISA 120 
STEPHENS, NIKKI 109, 241, 252 
STEPHENS, PAUL 133 
STEPHENS, RANDY 276 
STEPHENS, SCOTT 133 
STEPHENSON, CINDY 109 
STEPHENSON, LAURA 170, 181 
STEPHENSON, SHEA 94, 240 
STEPTOE, BRUCE 109, 228 
STEVENS, ELEANOR 120, 252 
STEWART, ANISSA 109 
STEWART, CHRISTI 120 
STEWART, CINDY 133 
STEWART, MARY 133 
sriWART. RICHARD 94. 247, 272 



STEWART, ROBERT 109, 133 

STEWART, SHANNON 120, 241, 252 

STEWART, SUSAN 109 

STEWART, TERRI 120 

STEWART, TONIA 94 

STIVERS, CAROL 120 

STOKES, REBECCA 94 

STOKLEY, LINDA 133, 228 

STONE, JAMES 109, 243, 258 

STONE, JOANNE 133 

STONE, LISA 94, 242, 256 

STONE, PENNY 94 

STONE, TERESA 94, 172, 174 

STOREY, MARK 133 

STORY, SUSAN 133, 229 

STOUGH, ANNETTE 133 

STOUGH, MARTHA 133 

STRAHL, DAVID 94 

STRAUGHN, CHRISTINE 94, 242, 256 

STREET, HAROLD 120 

STREETS, SHERYL 120, 164, 169, 184, 244, 264 

STREIT, ANDREW 109 

STRICKLAND, JEFFREY 94 

STRICKLAND, MARK 120 

STRICKLAND, MICHAEL 94 

STRICKLAND, PAUL 94 

STRICKLIN, GRANT 94 

STRINGFELLOW, MARK 133,305 

STROTHER, MARK 109 

STROUSE, JEFFREY 94, 174, 228, 249 

STROUSE, TRACY 133, 268 

STUCKEY, DONNA 94 

STUMP, DEREK 94, 245, 266 

STUMP, JASON 120, 245 

STURDIVANT, JESSICA 109 

STYRON, ERIC 94 

SUCANSKY, SUSAN 94, 345, 346 

SUJAN, HARESH 109, 184 

SULLIVAN, DEBORAH 133 

SULLIVAN, JOHN 133, 214 

SULLIVAN, MONICA 94, 240 

SULLIVAN, PHILLIP 133, 191 

SULLIVAN, TED 217, 247, 272 

SULLIVAN, THERESA 109 

SULLIVANT, JULIE 109, 211 

SUMMERALL, DAVID 120, 295 

SUMMERLIN, LORI 109, 202 

SUMMERS, JOHANNA 109, 256 

SUMMERS, STEVEN 109 

SUMNER, ELIZABETH 120, 241, 252, 272, 273 

SUNDARAM, VIN 184 

SUTHERLAND, ROBERT 94 

SUTHERLAND, SUSAN 120, 219, 229 

sUTTER, BRADLEY 94, 274 

SUTTON, SHAWN 94, 342 

SVIGLIN, HELENA 120, 186 

SVOPA, STEVE 120 

SWANIGAN, ASKER 109 

SWEAT, LEWIS 120 

SWEAT, YVONNE 133, 169 



TABB, HAROLD 133 

TABLER, JEFFREY 133, 243, 258, 259 

TADLOCK, ROBERT 94 

TALBOT, BILL 94, 248, 276 

TANNER, ANGELA 109, 267 

TANNER, CHARLES 109, 266 

TARVER, DEBORA 133 

TARVIR, MELISA 120, 244 

TARVIN, CYNTHIA 94, 240 

TATUM, LANCE 274 

TAUNTON, RENA 120, 175, 181, 191, 202 

TAYLOR, CLAIRE 137 

TAYLOR, DALISIA 94, 165, 242, 249 



TAYLOR, DANIEL 94, 228 

TAYLOR, DAVID 133 

TAYLOR, DEANNA 120 

TAYLOR, DEDIE 94, 169, 241, 252, 272, 273, 301, 

323 
TAYLOR, DEIDRA 109, 245 
TAYLOR, FREDDIE 133 
TAYLOR, HAROLD 94 
TAYLOR, JAMES 120 
TAYLOR, JANET 94 
TAYLOR, JEANNIE 109 
TAYLOR, JENNIFER 94, 241, 252 
TAYLOR, LARRY 94 
TAYLOR, LISA 120, 133, 240, 250 
TAYLOR, MARCUS 94, 251 
TAYLOR, SAMANTHA 109, 242, 256 
TAYLOR, TERRY 109 
TAYLOR, WENDELL 95 
TAYLOR, WILLIAM 109 
TEMPLIN, BOBBY 204 
TERRELL, ANDREW 120 
TERRELL, KENNETH 94, 228 
TEW, TIMOTHY 120, 248 
THAMES, MIRIAM 120, 252, 267 
THIERFELDER, DANA 133 
THIGPEN, FRANK 109, 317 
THOMAS, BESSIE 109 
THOMAS, CATHERINE 133, 172 
THOMAS, DARRLY 305, 307 
THOMAS, FLORENCE 120 
THOMAS, KAREN 95, 241, 252 
THOMAS, KURT 133, 243, 330 
THOMAS, LAURENCE 133 
THOMAS, LESIA 120 
THOMAS, MELANIE 133 
THOMAS, RUSSELL 109 
THOMAS, SALLY 120 
THOMAS, STEPHEN 95 
THOMAS, WILLIE 109 
THOMAS, ZANETTA 134 
THOMASON, JENNIFER 95 
THOMPKINS, DEBBIE 95 
THOMPSON, CARRIE 134 
THOMPSON, CHERYL 134 
THOMPSON, FRANCIS 134 
THOMPSON, JULIE 120, 195 
THOMPSON, KENNETH 120 
THOMPSON, LANG 251, 274 
THOMPSON, MELONI 134 
THOMPSON, SALLY 134 
THOMPSON, SHARON 134 
THOMPSON, STACEY 134 
THOMPSON, STACY 95 
THOMPSON, TONYA 95, 240, 250 
THORNTON, ANGELA 95 
THORNTON, LISA 134, 180 
THORPE, ANTHONY 95 
THORPE, JULIE 120, 242, 256 
THRASH, SONYA 109 
THREADGILL, JAMES 137 
THREATT, DYPHELIA 95 
THURLOW, KELLY 134, 218 
TIBLIER, EMILE 95 
TICE, KENDRA 95, 244, 264 
TIDWELL, DONNA 109 
TIDWELL, RONDA 95 
TILLERY, CYNTHIA 109, 245 
TILLERY, MELISSA 95 
TILLERY, MICHAEL 95 
TILLIS, JOHN 134, 166, 208, 210 
TILLMAN, LORI 95, 242, 256 
TIMBERLAKE, RONALD 109 
TIMBS, TABATHA 120, 169 
TINER, CONSTANCE 137 
TIPPETT, DONNA 109, 211, 229 
TIPTON, CHARLES 120, 162, 167, 247 
TIRADO, DONNA 109 
TISDALE, CYNTHIA 95, 174, 214 
TISDALE, JEFFERY 109, 246 
TISDALE, SANDRA 109 



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TRIPPI. Ml( IIMI 120 

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II i KIR, |IU 120 

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H I YRIEllO. DANIEL 134, 167 III 

H RBIRMIII ( VIMS. 120 212, 252 

Tl'KBIRMII E. KKISIA 109, 228 

TURDO MIKI 114 

TURK. DAVID 95. 229 

TURK, MICMAtl 134. lbb 

TURN1K AMY 120 .'40 250 

TURNER. ASCII \ 120 192 

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TURNER, LOIS 109, 189 

II RNER, PAUL 95. 247, 272 

TURNER. TIM 95 

II TC MIONE, SHARON 95 

TYLER. CARLOS H4 

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VARNEY. SAMANIH V 121 
VASS, NANCY 109, 172, 175. 202, 203 
VAUGHAS VMI 95 .'41 252 
VAUGHAN, LUKE 114 
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VICKERY, TIMOTHY 95, 
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VISCO, LISA 95. 240 
VOGEI DONALD 95, 245 
VOIGT, BONNIE 95 
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WAGONIK BRIAN 95 251 240 274 

YY Mils ( HRIslOPHIR 95 P4 IHl. I 

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WAIDES KIHU ( V IS 268 

W MDIS sum 121 24K 274 

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W Msos DONNA 1 14 164 

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WATTS MM VSS no .'45, 268, 277 

Wl MMIRIORD UK VI II .'70 

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Wl VMK M VKI IS 110 

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Brett Kirkland and Dana Mock prepare foi 
the Homecoming festivities. 



Student Publications Board 



The University Student 
Publications Board (USPB) 
serves as a policy setting 
board whose chief responsi- 
bility is to exercise supervi- 
sion over the Tropolitan, Pal- 
ladium, and any other Uni- 
versity Publication the 



Chancellor of the University 
places under the boards ju- 
risdiction. 

The USPB assures the pub- 
lication's freedom from cen- 
sorship and the editor of 
those publications the right 
to develop their own editori- 



al policies and news cover- 
age. The USPB serves as a 
management board. The 
board selects, employs, and 
terminates the editors and 
business managers of the 
Tropolitan, Palladium and 
any other publication placed 



under its jurisdiction. Simi- 
larly, the Board supports 
those editors and managers 
against arbitray suspension 
and removal because of stu- 
dent, faculty, administrative 
or public disapproval of edi- 
torial policy or content. 




1988-89 Student Publications Board: 
Row One: Dr. Donald Gibson, Ad- 
ministrative Assistant to the Chan- 
cellor/Vice President of Student Af- 
fairs; Adam Byrd, ACUB Representa- 
tive; Darlene Hutcheinson, SGA 
Senate Representative; Garry Can- 



non, Palladium Editor; Jennifer 
Sohn, Palladium Business Manager; 
and Jacqueline Smith, Palladium Ad- 
visor. Row Two: David Johnson, 
SGA President; W.E. Hardin, Editor 
of Greenville Advocate; Bill Hopper, 
Vice President for Financial Affairs; 



Gordon McKerral, Tropolitan Advi- 
sor; Merrill Bankester, Dean of Jour- 
nalism; Neal Nash, IFC Representa- 
tive; and Sherri Pridgen, Panhellenic 
Representative. Not Shown: Fred 
Davis, Assistant to the Vice President 
of Academic Affairs; Dr. Doug Haw- 



kins, Member of TSU Board of Trust- 
ees; Beverly Aland, Tropolitan Edi- 
tor; and Vicki Hyatt, Tropolitan Busi- 
ness Manager. 



412 Student Publications Board 




TSU Photography 



Ready in a Flash 



Donald Norsworthy 

Director of 
Photographic Services 




TSU Photography Department: Derek Brown, Debbie Blair, Mike Moseley, Cara English, Bruce P.unsh. Tim lac obs and 
Ed Moseley; assistant chief photographer. 



TSU Photographs 413 




The Palladium 
Staff 



Garry Wayne Cannon 
Editor-in-Chief 



The idea of complete- 
ing 416 pages in 150 
working days is a con- 
cept many would consider 
impossible. However, for the 
Palladium Staff, it is just an- 
other year's work. Add to 
that little feat, the hours 
spent in classes, studying, 
and a active social life; you 
have the average Palladium 
Staff member. It is not an easy 
task to create a pictoral histo- 
ry of the Troy State Universi- 
ty System but for those that 
chose to work on the Palla- 
dium Staff it is a immense la- 
bor of love. 

The year started, as always, 
with complete strangers 
coming together with no 



concept of what was ahead of 
them. During the year, we 
meet the struggle of: good 
grades in accounting, bad 
tempers at deadline, com- 
puters from hell, and the 
never ending struggle to be- 
come more mature individ- 
uals. By the end of the year, 
it was as if we had been to- 
gether all our lives and the 
task of completing another 
issue of the Palladium was 
finished. 

It is hard to define the 
dedication it takes to be a 
member of the Palladium 
staff in one word, but if you 
had to, it would be "whole- 
hearted." 




Lori Featheringill 
Associate Editor 



Lisa Palmisano 
Associate Editor 



Jennifer Sohn 
Business Manager 



Jacqueline Smith 
Advisor 



414 Palladium Staff 




1988-89 Palladium Staff: Row One: Jennifer Sohn, Michelle Waddington, Garry Cannon, Lisa Palmisano and Amanda 
Merrill. Row Two: Kyle Smith, Lori Featheringill, Heath Deramus, Beth Weatherford, Lori Dean, Lisa Heard and \ inc enf 
Stansbury. Not Shown: Amy Evans, Bert Kelly and Dean Kervin. 



Palladium StaH 415 



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The end is here!! It is with sweet sorrow that I write this last page. I have worked on this 
publication for the last four years and as editor for the last two. It was also the forth year for my 
associate editor Lori Featheringill. Together we have meet the challenges of putting together 
this publication and we are both glad it is finally over. However, I know that we have had some 
good times and I will miss not seeing her as often as I do now. I wish she and her new husband 
Jonathan Scott the very best. I just hope he can put up with her. 

I have to say that the job of editor is not easy, but I had a good staff and each is a good friend. 
Jennifer Sohn, who served as my business manager and secretary was a pain in the *& . She 
also leaves this year to marry Doug Weeks and transfers to Florida State University. I hope that 
success will follow them. Lisa Palmisano, who is my fraternity little sis and the staffs newest 
associate editor, is crazy enough to stay for another year. I must thank "Cheese" for being a 
creative and wonderful friend. She has always had all her deadlines in on deadline, (what a 
concept!!!!) I also must thank Beth Weatherford for all the help she gave us in writing the 
campus life copy and Bert Kelly for his help with the Sports copy. Last but not least a special 
thank you goes to the staff: Mandy, Amy, Lori D., Kyle, Heath, Dean, Michelle, and Lisa H. 

My greatest impression of TSU will always be the faith that Jaqualine Smith and Dr. Donald 
Gibson placed in me when I first asked for this job. I simply hope that I came through on my 
part. 

It is not easy putting this book together and not many people would want the job, but for a 
few it is fun to meet the challanges of a new day. Next year, the Palladium will be the 
responsibility of Vince Stansbury. He is capable of doing a good job but he must remember 
that the staff is the arms and he is the mind. (What a Scarrrry thought!?) 

My lasting impressions of TSU are many. The years have flown by so fast and now it is time to 
start my life outside of these glass walls. I feel that the years at TSU have prepared me the best 
that anywhere else could have. Now the challage of tommorrow is mine and mine alone to 
meet. I have learned that I am a realist with the hope of becomeing a idealist, maybe that is the 
greatest lesson of all. 

Sincerely, 

Garry Wayne Cannon 
Editor-in-Chief 





416 Editor's Note 



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